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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 3. Oktober 1983 | Virgin Catalogue

Auszeichnungen Qobuz' Schallplattensammlung
Moments of Genesis are as spooky and arty as those on Abacab -- in particular, there's the tortured howl of "Mama," uncannily reminiscent of Phil Collins' Face Value, and the two-part "Second Home by the Sea" -- but this eponymous 1983 album is indeed a rebirth, as so many self-titled albums delivered in the thick of a band's career often are. Here the art rock functions as coloring to the pop songs, unlike on Abacab and Duke, where the reverse is true. Some of this may be covering their bets -- to ensure that the longtime fans didn't jump ship, they gave them a bit of art -- some of it may be that the band just couldn't leave prog behind, but the end result is the same: as of this record, Genesis was now primarily a pop band. Anybody who paid attention to "Misunderstanding" and "No Reply at All" could tell that this was a good pop band, primarily thanks to the rapidly escalating confidence of Phil Collins, but Genesis illustrates just how good they could be, by balancing such sleek, pulsating pop tunes as "That's All" with a newfound touch for aching ballads, as on "Taking It All Too Hard." They still rocked -- "Just a Job to Do" has an almost nasty edge to its propulsion -- and they could still get too silly as on "Illegal Alien," where Phil's Speedy Gonzalez accident is an outright embarrassment (although in some ways it's not all that far removed from his Artful Dodger accent on the previous album's "Who Dunnit?"), and that's why the album doesn't quite gel. It has a little bit too much of everything -- too much pop, too much art, too much silliness -- so it doesn't pull together, but if taken individually, most of these moments are very strong, testaments to the increasing confidence and pop power of the trio, even if it's not quite what longtime fans might care to hear. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD13,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2004 | Virgin Catalogue

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CD21,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 18. November 1974 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Das einzige Doppel-Studioalbum der Gruppe kennzeichnete den Höhepunkt ihrer frühen Schaffensperiode. Erzählt wird in diesem Musical-Drama die Geschichte des Rael, eines New Yorker Straßengauners, dessen Charakter perfekt von Peter Gabriel umgesetzt wird. Gesang und Musik sind stark, und die neu bearbeitete Version des Jahres 1995 ist die erste CD-Edition, die so gut (oder sogar noch besser) klingt wie die hervorragende Atco-Originalpressung aus dem Jahr 1975. Die Länge des Stücks ist zwar etwas gewöhnungsbedürftig, die meisten wirklichen Fans sind jedoch der Ansicht, dass dieses Album die beste Aufnahme ist, die die Band jemals hervorgebracht hat. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. November 1973 | Virgin Catalogue

Genesis proved that they could rock on Foxtrot but on its follow-up Selling England by the Pound they didn't follow this route, they returned to the English eccentricity of their first records, which wasn't so much a retreat as a consolidation of powers. For even if this eight-track album has no one song that hits as hard as "Watcher of the Skies," Genesis hasn't sacrificed the newfound immediacy of Foxtrot: they've married it to their eccentricity, finding ways to infuse it into the delicate whimsy that's been their calling card since the beginning. This, combined with many overt literary allusions -- the Tolkeinisms of the title of "The Battle of Epping Forest" only being the most apparent -- gives this album a storybook quality. It plays as a collection of short stories, fables, and fairy tales, and it is also a rock record, which naturally makes it quite extraordinary as a collection, but also as a set of individual songs. Genesis has never been as direct as they've been on the fanciful yet hook-driven "I Know What I Like (In Your Wardrobe)" -- apart from the fluttering flutes in the fade-out, it could easily be mistaken for a glam single -- or as achingly fragile as on "More Fool Me," sung by Phil Collins. It's this delicate balance and how the album showcases the band's narrative force on a small scale as well as large that makes this their arguable high-water mark. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 2. Februar 1976 | Virgin Catalogue

After Peter Gabriel departed for a solo career, Genesis embarked on a long journey to find a replacement, only to wind back around to their drummer, Phil Collins, as a replacement. With Collins as their new frontman, the band decided not to pursue the stylish, jagged postmodernism of The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway -- a move that Gabriel would do in his solo career -- and instead returned to the English eccentricity of Selling England by the Pound for its next effort, A Trick of the Tail. In almost every respect, this feels like a truer sequel to Selling England by the Pound than Lamb; after all, that double album was obsessed with modernity and nightmare, whereas this album returns the group to the fanciful fairy tale nature of its earlier records. Also, Genesis were moving away from the barbed pop of the first LP and returning to elastic numbers that showcased their instrumental prowess, and they sounded more forceful and unified as a band than they had since Foxtrot. Not that this album is quite as memorable as Foxtrot or Selling England, largely because its songs aren't as immediate or memorable: apart from "Dance on a Volcano," this is about the sound of the band playing, not individual songs, and it succeeds on that level quite wildly -- to the extent that it proved to longtime fans that Genesis could possibly thrive without its former leader in tow. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 28. Oktober 1991 | Virgin Catalogue

After spending the 1980s moving in an increasingly pop-friendly direction, 1991's We Can't Dance marked a return to earlier aesthetics for Genesis. Edgier with more prominent guitars and live drums than on Invisible Touch, the record was the band's strongest musical statement in over a decade. With "Driving the Last Spike" and the dark "Dreaming While You Sleep" the group revisited one of their forgotten strengths, telling extended stories. That's not to say the album is a return to The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway or Trick of the Tail. Indeed, while there are several extended pieces on the record, there is none of the eccentricities, odd meters, or extended virtuoso solos of the band's progressive heyday. The album's closer, "Fading Lights," comes the closest, featuring an outstanding instrumental mid-section. Unfortunately, the record also contains some gutless ballads and paeans for world understanding that sound miles away from any immediacy. However, the surprisingly gritty singles "No Son of Mine," "Jesus He Knows Me," and "I Can't Dance" help make up for the album's weaker moments. © Geoff Orens /TiVo
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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 23. März 1978 | Virgin Catalogue

And Then There Were Three, more than either of its immediate predecessors, feels like the beginning of the second phase of Genesis -- in large part because the lineup had indeed dwindled down to Tony Banks, Mike Rutherford, and Phil Collins, a situation alluded to in the title. But it wasn't just a whittling of the lineup; the group's aesthetic was also shifting, moving away from the fantastical, literary landscapes that marked both the early Genesis LPs and the two transitional post-Gabriel outings, as the bandmembers turned their lyrical references to contemporary concerns and slowly worked pop into the mix, as heard on the closing "Follow You Follow Me," the band's first genuine pop hit. Its calm, insistent melody, layered with harmonies, is a perfect soft rock hook, although there's a glassy, almost eerie quality to the production that is also heard throughout the rest of the record. These chilly surfaces are an indication that Genesis don't quite want to abandon prog at this point, but the increasing emphasis on melody and tight song structures points the way toward the group's '80s work. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2007 | Virgin Catalogue

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CD14,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 31. März 1980 | Virgin Catalogue

If And Then There Were Three suggested that Genesis were moving toward pop, Duke is where they leaped into the fray. Not that it was exactly a head-first leap: the band may have peppered the album with pop songs, but there was still a heavy dose of prog, as the concluding "Duke" suite made clear. This is modernist art rock, quite dissimilar to the fragile, delicate Selling England by the Pound, and sometimes the precision of the attack can be a little bombastic. Nevertheless, this is a major leap forward in distinguishing the sound of Genesis, the band, and along with a new signature sound come pop songs, particularly in the guise of "Misunderstanding" and "Turn It on Again." The first is a light, nearly soulful, heartache song, the latter is a thunderous arena rocker, and both showcase the new version of Genesis at its absolute best. The rest of the record comes close to matching them. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. November 1971 | Virgin Catalogue

If Genesis truly established themselves as progressive rockers on Trespass, Nursery Cryme is where their signature persona was unveiled: true English eccentrics, one part Lewis Carroll and one part Syd Barrett, creating a fanciful world that emphasized the band's instrumental prowess as much as Peter Gabriel's theatricality. Which isn't to say that all of Nursery Cryme works. There are times when the whimsy is overwhelming, just as there are periods when there's too much instrumental indulgence, yet there's a charm to this indulgence, since the group is letting itself run wild. Even if they've yet to find the furthest reaches of their imagination, part of the charm is hearing them test out its limits, something that does result in genuine masterpieces, as on "The Musical Box" and "The Return of the Giant Hogweed," two epics that dominate the first side of the album and give it its foundation. If the second side isn't quite as compelling or quite as structured, it doesn't quite matter because these are the songs that showed what Genesis could do, and they still stand as pinnacles of what the band could achieve. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD8,49 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Oktober 1972 | Virgin Catalogue

Foxtrot is where Genesis began to pull all of its varied inspirations into a cohesive sound -- which doesn't necessarily mean that the album is streamlined, for this is a group that always was grandiose even when they were cohesive, or even when they rocked, which they truly do for the first time here. Indeed, the startling thing about the opening "Watcher of the Skies" is that it's the first time that Genesis attacked like a rock band, playing with a visceral power. There's might and majesty here, and it, along with "Get 'Em Out by Friday," is the truest sign that Genesis has grown muscle without abandoning the whimsy. Certainly, they've rarely sounded as fantastical or odd as they do on the epic 22-minute closer "Supper's Ready," a nearly side-long suite that remains one of the group's signature moments. It ebbs, flows, teases, and taunts, see-sawing between coiled instrumental attacks and delicate pastoral fairy tales. If Peter Gabriel remained a rather inscrutable lyricist, his gift for imagery is abundant, as there are passages throughout the album that are hauntingly evocative in their precious prose. But what impresses most about Foxtrot is how that precociousness is delivered with pure musical force. This is the rare art-rock album that excels at both the art and the rock, and it's a pinnacle of the genre (and decade) because of it. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2007 | Virgin Catalogue

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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 25. November 2007 | Virgin Catalogue

„Live Over Europe 2007” wurde gleich ein paar Monate nach der Wiedervereinigungstour von Genesis im Sommer 2007 auf den Markt gebracht. Das Album ist eine aus 21 Tracks bestehende Sammlung, auf der Phil Collins, Mike Rutherford und Tony Banks Stücke aus jeder Ära der Bandkarriere zum Besten geben, wobei gleichermaßen viel Wert auf Pophits und lange Progressive-Stücke gelegt wird. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD12,49 €

Rock - Erschienen am 18. September 1981 | Virgin Catalogue

Duke showcased a new Genesis -- a sleek, hard, stylish trio that truly sounded like a different band from its first incarnation -- but Abacab was where this new incarnation of the band came into its own. Working with producer Hugh Padgham, the group escalated the innovations of Duke, increasing the pop hooks, working them seamlessly into the artiest rock here. And even if the brash, glorious pop of "No Reply at All" -- powered by the percolating horns of Earth, Wind & Fire, yet polished into a precise piece of nearly new wave pop by Padgham -- suggests otherwise, this is still art rock at its core, or at least album-oriented rock, as the band works serious syncopations and instrumental forays into a sound that's as bright, bold, and jagged as the modernist artwork on the cover. They dabble in other genres, lacing "Me and Sarah Jane" with a reggae beat, for instance, which often adds dimension to their sound, as when "Dodo" rides a hard funk beat and greasy organ synths yet doesn't become obvious; it turns inward, requiring active listening. Truly, only "No Reply at All," the rampaging title track (possibly their hardest-rocking song to date), and the sleek and spooky "Man on the Corner" (which hides a real melancholy heart underneath its glistening surface) are immediate and accessible -- although the Mockney jokes of "Who Dunnit?" could count, it's too much of a geeky novelty to be pop. The rest of Abacab is truly modern art rock, their last album that could bear that tag comfortably. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1994 | Charisma Catalogue

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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2008 | Virgin Catalogue

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CD27,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1998 | Virgin Catalogue

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CD10,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1999 | Virgin Catalogue

Die Tage sind schon wieder deutlich kürzer, draussen ist es kalt und ungemütlich, Wollpullover werden hervorgekramt. Bald werden die ersten Lichterketten aufgehängt, Plätzchen gebacken, es gibt Glühwein und heiße Maroni. Weihnachten rückt näher und damit auch der jährliche Ansturm von "Best Of"-Alben... Zum Ende des Jahrtausends haben sich nun auch Genesis entschlossen, ihre größten Hits auf einem Album unterzubringen. Und damit man auch den Fan, der sonst schon alles hat, vielleicht noch zum Kauf überreden kann, hat man ein kleines Schmankerl mit auf die CD gesetzt: "Carpet Crawlers" vom 74er Klassiker "The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway" wurde mit Peter Gabriel und Phil Collins neu aufgenommen. Allerdings befanden sich alle Genesis-Mitglieder nie zur gleichen Zeit im Studio... Einerseits riecht das alles nach ziemlicher Abzocke, vor allem nachdem das letzte Genesis-Album "Calling All Stations" mit neuem Sänger Ray Wilson doch ziemlich hinter den Erwartungen zurückblieb und erstmals seit Jahrzehnten eine Tour nicht ausverkauft war. Andererseits ist es aber durchaus zu verstehen, wenn Genesis nach 30 Jahren ihres Bestehens eine "Best Of" veröffentlichen. Wirklich brauchen wird sie wohl niemand, gut verkaufen wird sie sich aber trotzdem. Viel interessanter dürfte das neue Soloalbum "Up" von Peter Gabriel werden, das im nächsten Jahr erscheint. © Laut
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CD24,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 17. September 2021 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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CD8,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 17. März 1969 | Cherry Red Records