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Taj Mahal - Taj Mahal

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Taj Mahal

Taj Mahal

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Langue disponible : anglais

Taj Mahal's debut album was a startling statement in its time and has held up remarkably well. Recorded in August of 1967, it was as hard and exciting a mix of old and new blues sounds as surfaced on record in a year when even a lot of veteran blues artists (mostly at the insistence of their record labels) started turning toward psychedelia. The guitar virtuosity, embodied in Taj Mahal's slide work (which had the subtlety of a classical performance), Jesse Ed Davis's lead playing, and rhythm work by Ry Cooder and Bill Boatman, is of the neatly stripped-down variety that was alien to most records aiming for popular appeal, and the singer himself approached the music with a startling mix of authenticity and youthful enthusiasm. The whole record is a strange and compelling amalgam of stylistic and technical achievements -- filled with blues influences of the 1930s and 1940s, but also making use of stereo sound separation and the best recording technology. The result was numbers like Sleepy John Estes' "Diving Duck Blues," with textures resembling the mix on the early Cream albums, while "The Celebrated Walkin' Blues" (even with Cooder's animated mandolin weaving its spell on one side of the stereo mix) has the sound of a late '40s Chess release by Muddy Waters. Blind Willie McTell ("Statesboro Blues") and Robert Johnson ("Dust My Broom") are also represented, in what had to be one of the most quietly, defiantly iconoclastic records of 1968.
© Bruce Eder /TiVo

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Taj Mahal

Taj Mahal

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1
Leaving Trunk (Album Version)
00:04:52

James Thomas, Bass - Ryland P. Cooder, Mandolin - Jessie Edwin Davis, Guitar - Jessie Edwin Davis, Piano - Taj Mahal, Performer - Taj Mahal, Harp - Taj Mahal, Slide Guitar - Taj Mahal, Vocal - David Rubinson, Producer - Sanford Konikoff, Drums - Charles Blackwell, Drums - Gary Gilmore, Bass - Sleepy John Estes, Composer - Sleepy John Estes, Lyricist

Originally released 1968. All rights reserved by Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

2
Statesboro Blues (Album Version)
00:02:59

Sanford Konikoff, Drums - Taj Mahal, Vocal - Taj Mahal, Performer - Taj Mahal, Harmonica - James Thomas, Bass - Jesse Ed Davis, Guitar - Willie McTell, Composer - Willie McTell, Lyricist - David Rubinson, Producer

Originally released 1968. All rights reserved by Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

3
Checkin' Up On My Baby (Album Version)
00:04:55

James Thomas, Bass - Ryland P. Cooder, Mandolin - Jessie Edwin Davis, Guitar - Jessie Edwin Davis, Piano - Taj Mahal, Performer - Taj Mahal, Harp - Taj Mahal, Slide Guitar - Taj Mahal, Vocal - David Rubinson, Producer - Sonny Boy Williamson, Composer - Sonny Boy Williamson, Lyricist - Sanford Konikoff, Drums - Charles Blackwell, Drums - Gary Gilmore, Bass - Vic Anesini, Mastering Engineer

Originally released 1968. All rights reserved by Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

4
Everybody's Got to Change Sometime (Album Version)
00:02:58

James Thomas, Bass - Ryland P. Cooder, Mandolin - Jessie Edwin Davis, Guitar - Jessie Edwin Davis, Piano - Taj Mahal, Performer - Taj Mahal, Harp - Taj Mahal, Slide Guitar - Taj Mahal, Vocal - David Rubinson, Producer - Sanford Konikoff, Drums - Charles Blackwell, Drums - Gary Gilmore, Bass - Vic Anesini, Mastering Engineer - Sleepy John Estes, Composer - Sleepy John Estes, Lyricist

Originally released 1968. All rights reserved by Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

5
E Z Rider (Album Version)
00:03:04

James Thomas, Bass - Ryland P. Cooder, Mandolin - Jessie Edwin Davis, Guitar - Jessie Edwin Davis, Piano - Taj Mahal, Composer - Taj Mahal, Lyricist - Taj Mahal, Performer - Taj Mahal, Harp - Taj Mahal, Slide Guitar - Taj Mahal, Vocal - David Rubinson, Producer - Sanford Konikoff, Drums - Charles Blackwell, Drums - Gary Gilmore, Bass - Vic Anesini, Mastering Engineer

Originally released 1968. All rights reserved by Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

6
Dust My Broom (Album Version)
00:02:39

James Thomas, Bass - Ryland P. Cooder, Mandolin - Jessie Edwin Davis, Guitar - Jessie Edwin Davis, Piano - Taj Mahal, Performer - Taj Mahal, Harp - Taj Mahal, Slide Guitar - Taj Mahal, Vocal - David Rubinson, Producer - Sanford Konikoff, Drums - Robert Johnson, Composer - Robert Johnson, Lyricist - Charles Blackwell, Drums - Gary Gilmore, Bass - Vic Anesini, Mastering Engineer

Originally released 1968. All rights reserved by Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

7
Diving Duck Blues (Album Version)
00:02:43

James Thomas, Bass - Ryland P. Cooder, Mandolin - Jessie Edwin Davis, Guitar - Jessie Edwin Davis, Piano - Taj Mahal, Arranger - Taj Mahal, Performer - Taj Mahal, Harp - Taj Mahal, Slide Guitar - Taj Mahal, Vocal - David Rubinson, Producer - Sanford Konikoff, Drums - Charles Blackwell, Drums - Gary Gilmore, Bass - Vic Anesini, Mastering Engineer - Sleepy John Estes, Composer - Sleepy John Estes, Lyricist

Originally released 1968. All rights reserved by Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

8
Celebrated Walkin' Blues (Album Version)
00:08:53

James Thomas, Bass - Ryland P. Cooder, Mandolin - Jessie Edwin Davis, Guitar - Jessie Edwin Davis, Piano - Taj Mahal, Arranger - Taj Mahal, Performer - Taj Mahal, Harp - Taj Mahal, Slide Guitar - Taj Mahal, Vocal - David Rubinson, Producer - Sanford Konikoff, Drums - Traditional, Composer - Traditional, Lyricist - Charles Blackwell, Drums - Gary Gilmore, Bass

Originally released 1968. All rights reserved by Columbia Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

Descriptif de l'album

Taj Mahal's debut album was a startling statement in its time and has held up remarkably well. Recorded in August of 1967, it was as hard and exciting a mix of old and new blues sounds as surfaced on record in a year when even a lot of veteran blues artists (mostly at the insistence of their record labels) started turning toward psychedelia. The guitar virtuosity, embodied in Taj Mahal's slide work (which had the subtlety of a classical performance), Jesse Ed Davis's lead playing, and rhythm work by Ry Cooder and Bill Boatman, is of the neatly stripped-down variety that was alien to most records aiming for popular appeal, and the singer himself approached the music with a startling mix of authenticity and youthful enthusiasm. The whole record is a strange and compelling amalgam of stylistic and technical achievements -- filled with blues influences of the 1930s and 1940s, but also making use of stereo sound separation and the best recording technology. The result was numbers like Sleepy John Estes' "Diving Duck Blues," with textures resembling the mix on the early Cream albums, while "The Celebrated Walkin' Blues" (even with Cooder's animated mandolin weaving its spell on one side of the stereo mix) has the sound of a late '40s Chess release by Muddy Waters. Blind Willie McTell ("Statesboro Blues") and Robert Johnson ("Dust My Broom") are also represented, in what had to be one of the most quietly, defiantly iconoclastic records of 1968.
© Bruce Eder /TiVo

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