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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2014 | EMI Catalogue

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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2014 | EMI Catalogue

Publicada originalmente en 1999 en ocasión del reestreno de la película Yellow Submarine (realizada en 1968), esta colección reúne las canciones de los Beatles utilizadas en el film, todas ellas remezcladas a partir de las cintas originales. Dichas remezclas vuelven a editarse ahora en 2012, con motivo del lanzamiento del film en Blu-ray, sin cambio alguno en la lista u orden de los temas. © TiVo
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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 19 de febrero de 2013 | EMI Catalogue

Just as the film pays homage to the 1939 classic The Wizard of Oz, Danny Elfman delivers a love letter to the classic scores of old Hollywood on the soundtrack to Oz the Great and Powerful. Filled with whimsy, melodrama, and grandeur, the score wears its emotions on its sleeve, taking listeners on the kind of fantastical voyage that Elfman has become a master of. Just like the magical land of Oz, the score of Oz the Great and Powerful feels like an avenue of escape for dreamers looking for something to break up the monotony of their humdrum days, and while this score might lack the catchy musical numbers of its predecessor, it's nevertheless a solid outing from Elfman. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Infantil - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2013 | EMI Catalogue

Libreto
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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 11 de septiembre de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

The debut album from singer/actor Ross Lynch is also the soundtrack to his Disney TV show, Austin & Ally. On the show, Lynch, who looks a lot like former teen pop idol Aaron Carter, plays a mischievous vocalist who posts an online video of a song written by his strait-laced, stage fright-stricken friend Ally. The vid goes viral and hijinks ensue. Musically, the album flows from the One Direction style dance-pop of "Heard It On the Radio," to Justin Timberlake-sounding cuts like "Illusion," to even more contemporary sounding songs like the very Maroon 5-ish "Double Take." In that sense, Austin & Ally will definitely appeal to its pre-teen demographic and might even charm a few more grown-up fans of catchy, radio-ready dance pop. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Infantil - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

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Pop - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

La banda de sonido de Shake It Up, el programa de Disney Channel sobre dos amigas que finalmente tienen la oportunidad de realizar su sueño de convertirse en bailarinas profesionales, es tan animada como su subtítulo -Vivir para bailar- sugiere. Esta colección de pop bailable incluye "TTYLXOX", el exitoso mensaje de texto de Bella Thorne, la enérgica "Up Up and Away" de Blush, y la onda Ke$ha de "Turn It On", de Amber Lily, además de temas de Zendaya, Coco Jones y Adam Trent. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 3 de diciembre de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

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The team behind Disney's Wreck-It Ralph, the tale of a video game villain who wants to go good, committed to authenticity at every level of the movie, from including Q-Bert and and Clyde (aka the orange ghost from Pac-Man) as minor characters to making sure the film's music conveyed the golden age of arcade games and the feel of the games that followed. Wreck-It-Ralph shows that composer Henry Jackman and the other artists featured here did an impressive job of capturing that spirit without getting geeky enough to alienate anyone not steeped in gamer culture. That said, this soundtrack relishes that culture, most notably on "Wreck-It, Wreck-It-Ralph" by Buckner & Garcia, the duo who had their fingers on the pulse of the early '80s with "Pac-Man Fever." While "Wreck-It, Wreck-It Ralph" isn't quite as charmingly wacky as its predecessor, it still harks back to a time when a hit song could be written about a video game, instead of a game including a hit song on its soundtrack. Elsewhere, the J-pop group AKB48 embodies the kawaii feel of many Japanese games with the theme song for the candy-based racing game "Sugar Rush," while Skrillex's "Bug Hunt (Noisia Remix)" delivers a more-than-reasonable facsimile of the tense, aggressive music that soundtracks the first-person shooters of the 21st century. Jackman's score mostly follows suit, especially when it incorporates electronic elements as on "Royal Raceway"'s bleepy synth-pop paradise, the brilliantly rudimentary 8-bit doodles of "Life in the Arcade," or the relentless beat of "Rocket Fiasco." However, Jackman's music also relies heavily on orchestral arrangements that, while perfectly effective and even inspired in some cases ("Vanellope von Schweetz"'s playful pauses and dynamics recall the way Looney Tunes used these kind of cues) aren't quite as distinctive as an all- or mostly electronic score would have been. While Wreck-It-Ralph misses out on being a Tron for the preteen set, the soundtrack still scores high when it comes to playfulness and devotion to its subject matter. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Publicado el 15 de octubre de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 15 de octubre de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

Composer Danny Elfman's score for director Tim Burton's black-and-white stop-motion tale of a boy and his newly reanimated dog is steeped in the kind of rich, choir-driven, harmlessly macabre innocence that supplied 1990's Edward Scissorhands with the heart it needed to break free of its overly quirky trappings. With nods to the frantic, pinball-like precision of Pee Wee's Big Adventure ("Electricity") and the good-natured malevolence of The Nightmare Before Christmas ("Invisible Fish/Search for Sparky"), Frankenweenie is fun, breathlessly atmospheric, and surprisingly affecting. Employing an effortless mix of menace, heartache, and joy, Elfman has crafted his most sentimental and nuanced score since 2003's Big Fish, and while it may borrow liberally from some of his previous works, it's still a joy to listen to from start to finish. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

La banda de sonido de Shake It Up, el programa de Disney Channel sobre dos amigas que finalmente tienen la oportunidad de realizar su sueño de convertirse en bailarinas profesionales, es tan animada como su subtítulo -Vivir para bailar- sugiere. Esta colección de pop bailable incluye "TTYLXOX", el exitoso mensaje de texto de Bella Thorne, la enérgica "Up Up and Away" de Blush, y la onda Ke$ha de "Turn It On", de Amber Lily, además de temas de Zendaya, Coco Jones y Adam Trent. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 23 de julio de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

Brave es la primera película de Pixar cuyo protagonista principal es de sexo femenino: Merida, la obstinada princesa escocesa de cabellos al rojo vivo. Es también una de las películas más musicales del estudio, sacándole el máximo partido posible al sentimiento feminista juvenil de la película y a su ambientación celta, a través de una animada partitura de Patrick Doyle y canciones interpretadas por el elenco, la cantautora de folk escocés Julie Fowlis y la cantante y compositora inglesa Birdy. Fowlis a menudo canta en lengua gaélica escocesa, aunque su voz suena igualmente pletórica y tierna en inglés, mientras que Birdy encarna los sueños de libertad y espacios abiertos de Merida La partitura de Doyle embellece los números orquestales con abundantes gaitas, violines y melodías cantarinas, aunque también incluye algunos maravillosos momentos cómicos y otros de gran tensión. Brave mantiene en alto la reputación de Pixar haciendo gala de la reconocida capacidad del estudio para incorporar detalles creativos y apropiados en cada aspecto de sus producciones. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 13 de agosto de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

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Pop - Publicado el 24 de junio de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

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Infantil - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 3 de diciembre de 2012 | EMI Catalogue

The team behind Disney's Wreck-It Ralph, the tale of a video game villain who wants to go good, committed to authenticity at every level of the movie, from including Q-Bert and and Clyde (aka the orange ghost from Pac-Man) as minor characters to making sure the film's music conveyed the golden age of arcade games and the feel of the games that followed. Wreck-It-Ralph shows that composer Henry Jackman and the other artists featured here did an impressive job of capturing that spirit without getting geeky enough to alienate anyone not steeped in gamer culture. That said, this soundtrack relishes that culture, most notably on "Wreck-It, Wreck-It-Ralph" by Buckner & Garcia, the duo who had their fingers on the pulse of the early '80s with "Pac-Man Fever." While "Wreck-It, Wreck-It Ralph" isn't quite as charmingly wacky as its predecessor, it still harks back to a time when a hit song could be written about a video game, instead of a game including a hit song on its soundtrack. Elsewhere, the J-pop group AKB48 embodies the kawaii feel of many Japanese games with the theme song for the candy-based racing game "Sugar Rush," while Skrillex's "Bug Hunt (Noisia Remix)" delivers a more-than-reasonable facsimile of the tense, aggressive music that soundtracks the first-person shooters of the 21st century. Jackman's score mostly follows suit, especially when it incorporates electronic elements as on "Royal Raceway"'s bleepy synth-pop paradise, the brilliantly rudimentary 8-bit doodles of "Life in the Arcade," or the relentless beat of "Rocket Fiasco." However, Jackman's music also relies heavily on orchestral arrangements that, while perfectly effective and even inspired in some cases ("Vanellope von Schweetz"'s playful pauses and dynamics recall the way Looney Tunes used these kind of cues) aren't quite as distinctive as an all- or mostly electronic score would have been. While Wreck-It-Ralph misses out on being a Tron for the preteen set, the soundtrack still scores high when it comes to playfulness and devotion to its subject matter. © Heather Phares /TiVo