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Wood Fire

Cocoon

Pop - Publicado el 27 de septiembre de 2019 | Barclay

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In 2016, Welcome Home marked a turning point in Mark Daumail’s career as it was the first Cocoon album to not feature his other half Morgane Imbeaud, who left to pursue other horizons. The French singer-songwriter seemed anything but jaded by success and some of his songs ended up in commercials (Chupee). With that amazing third record, part-created in Richmond in Virginia at Matthew E. White’s house, Cocoon’s pop folk was enriched with soul flavours, violins and even gospel. Three years later, Mark Daumail prolonged his trip in the sun by going back to Cocoon’s basics. He speaks about love for the first time, viewing couples as fires that must be maintained. And he infuses his record with travel (Israel, California, Tuscany…) and people he has met along the way (Clou, Lola Marsh, Owlle…). The pop folk found in Wood Fire does not revolutionise Cocoon’s sound yet it has never felt so sincere and warm. As a big fan of Paul McCartney, Mark Daumail is above all a gifted composer who never forgets the basic ingredients of a good song. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
A partir de:
CD13,99 €

Wood Fire

Cocoon

Pop - Publicado el 27 de septiembre de 2019 | Barclay

In 2016, Welcome Home marked a turning point in Mark Daumail’s career as it was the first Cocoon album to not feature his other half Morgane Imbeaud, who left to pursue other horizons. The French singer-songwriter seemed anything but jaded by success and some of his songs ended up in commercials (Chupee). With that amazing third record, part-created in Richmond in Virginia at Matthew E. White’s house, Cocoon’s pop folk was enriched with soul flavours, violins and even gospel. Three years later, Mark Daumail prolonged his trip in the sun by going back to Cocoon’s basics. He speaks about love for the first time, viewing couples as fires that must be maintained. And he infuses his record with travel (Israel, California, Tuscany…) and people he has met along the way (Clou, Lola Marsh, Owlle…). The pop folk found in Wood Fire does not revolutionise Cocoon’s sound yet it has never felt so sincere and warm. As a big fan of Paul McCartney, Mark Daumail is above all a gifted composer who never forgets the basic ingredients of a good song. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
A partir de:
HI-RES19,49 €
CD13,99 €

L'An 40

Jeanne Cherhal

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 20 de septiembre de 2019 | Barclay

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L'An 40

Jeanne Cherhal

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 20 de septiembre de 2019 | Barclay

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Renan Luce

Renan Luce

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 24 de mayo de 2019 | Barclay

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Renan Luce

Renan Luce

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 24 de mayo de 2019 | Barclay

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Soliloquy

Lou Doillon

Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 1 de febrero de 2019 | Barclay

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Soliloquy

Lou Doillon

Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 1 de febrero de 2019 | Barclay

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Enfin !

Michel Polnareff

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 30 de noviembre de 2018 | Barclay

Hi-Res Libreto
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En amont

Alain Bashung

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 23 de noviembre de 2018 | Barclay

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Petite Amie

Juliette Armanet

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 7 de abril de 2017 | Barclay

Hi-Res Libreto
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Je reviens à toi (Deluxe Edition)

Marc Lavoine

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 26 de enero de 2018 | Barclay

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Trafic

Gaëtan Roussel

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 28 de septiembre de 2018 | Barclay

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Trafic

Gaëtan Roussel

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 28 de septiembre de 2018 | Barclay

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Trafic

Gaëtan Roussel

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 28 de septiembre de 2018 | Barclay

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Petite Amie

Juliette Armanet

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 7 de abril de 2017 | Barclay

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Qobuzissime
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Chant de bataille

Matt

Hip-Hop/Rap - Publicado el 16 de diciembre de 2016 | Barclay

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Lay Low

Lou Doillon

Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 9 de octubre de 2015 | Barclay

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The critical and commercial success of Lou Doillon's haunting debut Places -- which included the album's double platinum status in France and Doillon winning the French Grammy for Best Female Artist -- may have taken some by surprise. Lay Low proves that the acclaim for Doillon is no fluke, although her approach to her second album may also come as a surprise. Instead of making a bigger-sounding album, she pares back: a svelte 35 minutes, Lay Low's artfully spare songs let Doillon's voice dominate these songs even more than it did on Places. There's an ageless, almost androgynous depth and richness to her singing that evokes legends such as Odetta and Leonard Cohen, as well as more recent artists like Tindersticks' Stuart Staples and Timber Timbre's Taylor Kirk, who just happens to be Lay Low's co-producer. Together, they take Doillon's music in eclectic yet organic directions, whether it's the dusky, jazzy "Robin Miller," the sultry swagger of the title track, or the ever-so-slightly eerie warmth of "Above My Head," one of the tracks that bears a close kinship with Kirk's Timber Timbre work. Like Kirk, Doillon loves the classics but not too faithfully, and she puts her own stamp on "Let Me Go," a slow-building yet insistent ballad that would do Roy Orbison proud, and "Where to Start," a bit of Patsy Cline-esque heartache that peaks with Doillon crooning "I've got to stop this obsession." More often, though, Lay Low finds her with plenty of distance between her and the objects of her affection. On "Weekender Baby," she measures the time apart from her lover in cups of coffee, shots of whiskey, and telephone rings; on "Worth Saying," she muses, "Should I speak my truth and get you running?" As she explores the difference between being alone and being lonely on Lay Low, she sounds more confident and alluring than ever. © Heather Phares /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES19,49 €
CD13,99 €

Lay Low

Lou Doillon

Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 9 de octubre de 2015 | Barclay

Hi-Res Libreto
The critical and commercial success of Lou Doillon's haunting debut Places -- which included the album's double platinum status in France and Doillon winning the French Grammy for Best Female Artist -- may have taken some by surprise. Lay Low proves that the acclaim for Doillon is no fluke, although her approach to her second album may also come as a surprise. Instead of making a bigger-sounding album, she pares back: a svelte 35 minutes, Lay Low's artfully spare songs let Doillon's voice dominate these songs even more than it did on Places. There's an ageless, almost androgynous depth and richness to her singing that evokes legends such as Odetta and Leonard Cohen, as well as more recent artists like Tindersticks' Stuart Staples and Timber Timbre's Taylor Kirk, who just happens to be Lay Low's co-producer. Together, they take Doillon's music in eclectic yet organic directions, whether it's the dusky, jazzy "Robin Miller," the sultry swagger of the title track, or the ever-so-slightly eerie warmth of "Above My Head," one of the tracks that bears a close kinship with Kirk's Timber Timbre work. Like Kirk, Doillon loves the classics but not too faithfully, and she puts her own stamp on "Let Me Go," a slow-building yet insistent ballad that would do Roy Orbison proud, and "Where to Start," a bit of Patsy Cline-esque heartache that peaks with Doillon crooning "I've got to stop this obsession." More often, though, Lay Low finds her with plenty of distance between her and the objects of her affection. On "Weekender Baby," she measures the time apart from her lover in cups of coffee, shots of whiskey, and telephone rings; on "Worth Saying," she muses, "Should I speak my truth and get you running?" As she explores the difference between being alone and being lonely on Lay Low, she sounds more confident and alluring than ever. © Heather Phares /TiVo
A partir de:
CD12,49 €

Lay Low

Lou Doillon

Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 9 de octubre de 2015 | Barclay

Libreto
The critical and commercial success of Lou Doillon's haunting debut Places -- which included the album's double platinum status in France and Doillon winning the French Grammy for Best Female Artist -- may have taken some by surprise. Lay Low proves that the acclaim for Doillon is no fluke, although her approach to her second album may also come as a surprise. Instead of making a bigger-sounding album, she pares back: a svelte 35 minutes, Lay Low's artfully spare songs let Doillon's voice dominate these songs even more than it did on Places. There's an ageless, almost androgynous depth and richness to her singing that evokes legends such as Odetta and Leonard Cohen, as well as more recent artists like Tindersticks' Stuart Staples and Timber Timbre's Taylor Kirk, who just happens to be Lay Low's co-producer. Together, they take Doillon's music in eclectic yet organic directions, whether it's the dusky, jazzy "Robin Miller," the sultry swagger of the title track, or the ever-so-slightly eerie warmth of "Above My Head," one of the tracks that bears a close kinship with Kirk's Timber Timbre work. Like Kirk, Doillon loves the classics but not too faithfully, and she puts her own stamp on "Let Me Go," a slow-building yet insistent ballad that would do Roy Orbison proud, and "Where to Start," a bit of Patsy Cline-esque heartache that peaks with Doillon crooning "I've got to stop this obsession." More often, though, Lay Low finds her with plenty of distance between her and the objects of her affection. On "Weekender Baby," she measures the time apart from her lover in cups of coffee, shots of whiskey, and telephone rings; on "Worth Saying," she muses, "Should I speak my truth and get you running?" As she explores the difference between being alone and being lonely on Lay Low, she sounds more confident and alluring than ever. © Heather Phares /TiVo

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