Ihr Warenkorb ist leer!

Genre :

Ähnliche Künstler

Die Alben

Ab
CD11,49 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 22. Juli 2014 | Transgressive

Canadian quintet Alvvays (pronounced "Always") burst out of the gates with their self-titled 2014 debut, a brief but bright collection of nine songs of nearly perfect, sugar-coated indie pop. The band call on inspiration from the jangly C-86 movement and bands like the Wedding Present or Talulah Gosh, but also lean on the fuzzy, homespun spirit of early American independent bedroom pop and twee while steeping their tunes in a languid dreaminess borrowed from Teenage Fanclub at their most wistful. The album opens with the one-two punch of "Adult Diversion" and "Archie, Marry Me," two single-worthy songs of noisy guitars, gloriously deadpan vocal harmonies, and sticky melodies cemented in the listener's skull by the interplay between guitar and singer Molly Rankin's cascading vocals. The album is full of highlights, from the synthy melancholia of "Party Police" to the Orange Juice-esque interweaving guitar lines of "Atop a Cake." While Alvvays relies on the same reverb-heavy production that an entire generation of beach-obsessed indie pop bands has tended toward, they surpass many of their peers by delivering more inspired songs, often with unexpected shifts or breakthrough moments. This debut surpasses simply being "promising" by delivering pop as beautifully composed as that of contemporaries like Pains of Being Pure at Heart or Veronica Falls, while also tying in sentiments of punk gusto, twee wonderment, and dream pop thoughtfulness without relying strictly on the musical blueprints of any of those genres. Instead, Alvvays find a way to articulate their heart-struck, dream-like songs with deft intention and control. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
Ab
HI-RES17,49 Fr.
CD12,49 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 8. September 2017 | Transgressive

Hi-Res
After releasing a debut album of noisy pop that was perfectly formed and felt like the work of a band already at the summit of their career, it seemed like the only place Alvvays could have gone was down. Maybe sideways, at the very best. Instead, after taking their time both writing and recording the follow-up, they made a giant leap forward instead. Antisocialites has all the sticky hooks of the debut, all the boisterous noise, and the open-hearted honesty, too. What the band adds this time is confidence and skill, gained from the reception their debut got and also all the time they spent playing bigger and bigger shows. The sound of the album is bigger and the arrangements fuller and more spacious, giving the instruments room to breathe. It's a bit of a change, but it works in their favor, especially since Molly Rankin's vocals are a little more to the front of the mix and she sounds strong and fully in command of her voice, while retaining all the vulnerability she displayed before. The album is heavy with break-up songs and she captures the varying moods of a break-up with surgical precision. The pain seeps out of songs like "In Undertow" and "Not My Baby" like a fresh wound, while resigned anger flows through "Your Type" and a little bit of hope creeps into "Forget About Life." The songs too, aim for and hit their targets dead on, whether its melancholy nostalgia on the lovely new wave ballad "Dreams Tonite," the zippy dance-rock floor filler "Hey," or the bouncing pop-punker "Lollipop (Ode to Jim)." The instantly catchy "Plimsoll Punks" is the equal, hook-wise, of "Archie, Marry Me," and there's not a weak link anywhere. The production (courtesy of John Congleton) is layered and clean, with reverb and noise used as a spice instead of a main course. Unlike the first album, where things tended to blend together into a whirring blur of noise, things are both more restrained and more exciting here. It's down to dynamics and arrangements, both of which they pay close attention to at all times. The guitars aren't just a Wall of Sound, there are great riffs, lines, and sounds that pop in and out of the mix. The backing vocal harmonies are more a part of the sound this time too, and Kerri MacLellan's keyboards are even audible sometimes. Thanks to the care and feeding the band put into their sound, Antisocialites manages the rare feat of a band following their brilliant debut with a sophomore effort that's just as special. Alvvays make it looks easy, and by the time the album is done spinning, it's hard not to start thinking about how great their next record could be. © Tim Sendra /TiVo