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Jazz - Erschienen am 9. September 2013 | Verve

Hi-Res Auszeichnungen Sélection FIP - Hi-Res Audio
Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews' third Verve album, Say That to Say This, might be the one he should have cut first. Backatown and For True -- both produced by Galactic's Ben Ellman -- were as steeped in rock and hip-hop as they were jazz and funk; they were actually very experimental records yet both charted and were well-received internationally. This date, co-produced with Raphael Saadiq, is a much more R&B-oriented recording -- and proves a definite plus in a number of ways. Shorty's become much more disciplined, as revealed by this collection of groove-conscious soul and modern NOLA funk (and though it's more polished -- having been recorded almost wholly in Hollywood -- it is closer to what he does live). Things kick off with the title track, one of four instrumentals, led by Michael Ballard's whomping bassline. Though Shorty's horns were cut in NOLA, it feels like the band is playing live, with a Meters-esque groove. The call and response between his horns and Peter Murano's guitar is nasty. The Meters' trademark funk is at the heart of "Get the Picture," with Saadiq on backing vocals. The track is built on Murano's snaky guitar, Ballard's bubbling bassline, and Saadiq's vicious clavinet, with the vocal punch declaring its intention above Joey Peebles' knotty breaks. Speaking of the Meters, the original band appears here on record for the first time since 1978 with their ballad "Be My Lady." It's almost a carbon of the original that appeared on their New Directions album, with only modern production and the trombone solo adding new dimensions -- George Porter's bumping bassline and the gorgeous interplay of Shorty's and Cyril Neville's voices make it a highlight. The brief "Vieux Carre" weds a jazz chart to a Caribbean, Latin-tinged groove with Andrews playing not only horns but also drums with Saadiq on bass. The streetwise "Fire and Brimstone," introduced by Ballard and Murano, is a triumphant, militant anthem to survival and success amid the struggle of life in the Treme. Andrews' vocals and horns underscore the groove (his trombone solo highlights the transcendence in his lyrics), and Saadiq's wonky clavinet flavors it all. It's followed by the breezy jazz of "Sunrise," with Shorty's trumpet solo atop his trombone, his congas complementing Peebles' drums as Saadiq's bass and Murano's guitar sweeten the tune's vamp. "Dream On" is the brighter side of the rise-above-it-all sentiment expressed on "Fire and Brimstone" (though its lyrics are just as gritty) with beautifully arranged vocal harmonies. Say That to Say This closes with the punchy, harder-edged "Shortyville," an instrumental duet. Andrews plays all instruments save for a roiling, pocket-stretching bass played by Saadiq. Shorty's improvising is right out of the NOLA jazz heritage even though it occurs inside a modern funk number. Ultimately, with all of its confidence, production polish, and sophistication, this is the album that should break Trombone Shorty to a much wider, more diverse audience. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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HI-RES17,49 €
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Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2011 | Verve Forecast

Hi-Res Auszeichnungen Découverte JAZZ NEWS - Hi-Res Audio
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CD14,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 9. September 2013 | Verve

Auszeichnungen Sélection FIP
Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews' third Verve album, Say That to Say This, might be the one he should have cut first. Backatown and For True -- both produced by Galactic's Ben Ellman -- were as steeped in rock and hip-hop as they were jazz and funk; they were actually very experimental records yet both charted and were well-received internationally. This date, co-produced with Raphael Saadiq, is a much more R&B-oriented recording -- and proves a definite plus in a number of ways. Shorty's become much more disciplined, as revealed by this collection of groove-conscious soul and modern NOLA funk (and though it's more polished -- having been recorded almost wholly in Hollywood -- it is closer to what he does live). Things kick off with the title track, one of four instrumentals, led by Michael Ballard's whomping bassline. Though Shorty's horns were cut in NOLA, it feels like the band is playing live, with a Meters-esque groove. The call and response between his horns and Peter Murano's guitar is nasty. The Meters' trademark funk is at the heart of "Get the Picture," with Saadiq on backing vocals. The track is built on Murano's snaky guitar, Ballard's bubbling bassline, and Saadiq's vicious clavinet, with the vocal punch declaring its intention above Joey Peebles' knotty breaks. Speaking of the Meters, the original band appears here on record for the first time since 1978 with their ballad "Be My Lady." It's almost a carbon of the original that appeared on their New Directions album, with only modern production and the trombone solo adding new dimensions -- George Porter's bumping bassline and the gorgeous interplay of Shorty's and Cyril Neville's voices make it a highlight. The brief "Vieux Carre" weds a jazz chart to a Caribbean, Latin-tinged groove with Andrews playing not only horns but also drums with Saadiq on bass. The streetwise "Fire and Brimstone," introduced by Ballard and Murano, is a triumphant, militant anthem to survival and success amid the struggle of life in the Treme. Andrews' vocals and horns underscore the groove (his trombone solo highlights the transcendence in his lyrics), and Saadiq's wonky clavinet flavors it all. It's followed by the breezy jazz of "Sunrise," with Shorty's trumpet solo atop his trombone, his congas complementing Peebles' drums as Saadiq's bass and Murano's guitar sweeten the tune's vamp. "Dream On" is the brighter side of the rise-above-it-all sentiment expressed on "Fire and Brimstone" (though its lyrics are just as gritty) with beautifully arranged vocal harmonies. Say That to Say This closes with the punchy, harder-edged "Shortyville," an instrumental duet. Andrews plays all instruments save for a roiling, pocket-stretching bass played by Saadiq. Shorty's improvising is right out of the NOLA jazz heritage even though it occurs inside a modern funk number. Ultimately, with all of its confidence, production polish, and sophistication, this is the album that should break Trombone Shorty to a much wider, more diverse audience. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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HI-RES19,49 €
CD13,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 28. April 2017 | Blue Note (US1A)

Hi-Res
On his fourth studio effort and first for Blue Note Records, 2017's Parking Lot Symphony, New Orleans singer, songwriter, and brass wizard Troy Andrews (aka Trombone Shorty) fully embraces the organic '70s-style R&B he’s heretofore only touched on. Ever since officially debuting in 2010 with Backatown, Andrews has moved ever closer to that '70s soul aesthetic with each subsequent album. Backatown even featured contributions from both Lenny Kravitz and legendary New Orleans pianist Allen Toussaint. In fact, his previous effort, 2013's Say That to Say This, had a similarly old-school bent courtesy of neo-soul master and co-producer Raphael Saadiq. But for Parking Lot Symphony, Andrews dives into the sound full-force, paired with producer Chris Seefried (Fitz & the Tantrums, Haley Reinhart, Andra Day) on a set of songs that bring to mind the earthy, vinyl-laden vibe of '70s artists like New Orleans own the Meters. Heralding this vintage approach are several well-chosen covers, like the Meters' 1974 Santana-style groover "It Ain't No Use," and Toussaint's New Orleans funk jammer "Here Come the Girls" (originally recorded in 1970 by Ernie K. Doe). Andrews channels new life into both tunes with his vibrant jazz- and brass-infused arrangements -- ones that don't so much reimagine the originals as re-energize them with a live-in-the-studio vibe and a youthful zeal. Even his originals here, like the joyous, choir-backed title track and the yearning, organ-steeped ballad "No Good Time," find him working in the nuanced harmonic colors and hip-swaying lyricism of band's like Earth, Wind & Fire and Stevie Wonder. And yet it would be reductive to simply describe the album as "retro." Longtime fans will appreciate that Andrews hasn't abandoned his crossover, hip-hop-inflected sound, just integrated it deftly into songs like the buzz-bass heavy "Familiar" and minor key-tinged "Where It At?," tracks that nobody would think twice about hearing churn out of the car stereo in 1977. Also, as with past Trombone Shorty albums, he leaves plenty of room for enthusiastic, mid-song trombone and trumpet improvisations. Andrews even ambitiously bookends the album with two New Orleans funeral parade marches, showcasing his bluesy phrasing and clarion brass tone. Ultimately, Parking Lot Symphony is one of Trombone Shorty's most balanced productions, equal parts New Orleans R&B sophistication and loose, block party fun. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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CD14,99 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2010 | Verve Forecast

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CD1,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2013 | Verve

Ab
CD14,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 28. April 2017 | Blue Note (US1A)

On his fourth studio effort and first for Blue Note Records, 2017's Parking Lot Symphony, New Orleans singer, songwriter, and brass wizard Troy Andrews (aka Trombone Shorty) fully embraces the organic '70s-style R&B he’s heretofore only touched on. Ever since officially debuting in 2010 with Backatown, Andrews has moved ever closer to that '70s soul aesthetic with each subsequent album. Backatown even featured contributions from both Lenny Kravitz and legendary New Orleans pianist Allen Toussaint. In fact, his previous effort, 2013's Say That to Say This, had a similarly old-school bent courtesy of neo-soul master and co-producer Raphael Saadiq. But for Parking Lot Symphony, Andrews dives into the sound full-force, paired with producer Chris Seefried (Fitz & the Tantrums, Haley Reinhart, Andra Day) on a set of songs that bring to mind the earthy, vinyl-laden vibe of '70s artists like New Orleans own the Meters. Heralding this vintage approach are several well-chosen covers, like the Meters' 1974 Santana-style groover "It Ain't No Use," and Toussaint's New Orleans funk jammer "Here Come the Girls" (originally recorded in 1970 by Ernie K. Doe). Andrews channels new life into both tunes with his vibrant jazz- and brass-infused arrangements -- ones that don't so much reimagine the originals as re-energize them with a live-in-the-studio vibe and a youthful zeal. Even his originals here, like the joyous, choir-backed title track and the yearning, organ-steeped ballad "No Good Time," find him working in the nuanced harmonic colors and hip-swaying lyricism of band's like Earth, Wind & Fire and Stevie Wonder. And yet it would be reductive to simply describe the album as "retro." Longtime fans will appreciate that Andrews hasn't abandoned his crossover, hip-hop-inflected sound, just integrated it deftly into songs like the buzz-bass heavy "Familiar" and minor key-tinged "Where It At?," tracks that nobody would think twice about hearing churn out of the car stereo in 1977. Also, as with past Trombone Shorty albums, he leaves plenty of room for enthusiastic, mid-song trombone and trumpet improvisations. Andrews even ambitiously bookends the album with two New Orleans funeral parade marches, showcasing his bluesy phrasing and clarion brass tone. Ultimately, Parking Lot Symphony is one of Trombone Shorty's most balanced productions, equal parts New Orleans R&B sophistication and loose, block party fun. © Matt Collar /TiVo