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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 8 de julio de 2016 | XL Recordings

Premios Pitchfork: Best New Music
In the 15-plus years since they released their masterpiece of sample-based electronica, Since I Left You, the Avalanches have been legendary ghosts kept alive by hopes, rumors, and memories of greatness compounded by a lack of anyone coming along to fill their shoes. With the release of 2016's Wildflower, the group stages a comeback that sadly falls short of expectations, but still ends up being a pretty good album anyway. In fact, if it hadn't been made by the Avalanches, it may even be a great album. The record is filled with their trademarks: heavy doses of summer sun so bright they seem to glisten more than shine, beats that seem to be constructed from bubblegum and rubber bands, samples that are witty and fit together like puzzle pieces. Kicking off with a track that sounds like part two of "Since I Left You," "Because I'm Me" seems headed for the same patch of nirvana when it is suddenly derailed by some rapping from Camp Lo that grounds the heavenly sounds in some real-life grit. Not only is the rapping here a distraction, it's the first of many guest appearances that serve to spoil what made Since I Left You so special. It had a timeless, immaculately constructed sound that was insular in the best way, made by a band of like-minded record geeks merrily toiling away over samplers and vinyl to create something brilliant. All the guest appearances on Wildflower not only wreck that feeling, but they are unnecessary. The Avalanches are masters at creating new melodies out of old records, fresh feelings out of lost snippets of sound; now they are kind of cheating by bringing in a bunch of people to do the heavy lifting for them -- and it's kind of like cheating when they don't have to. Not only do the many rappers (Danny Brown, MF Doom, Biz Markie, and others) sound out of place, the plethora of indie rockers (like Toro y Moi, Father John Misty, and Jennifer Herrema) do too. They all seem slapped on after the songs were already done, adding very little to the sounds already there. Only the two tracks featuring Mercury Rev's Jonathan Donahue ("Colours," "Kaleidoscope Lovers") work well since they sound like true collaborations. Skipping the songs with guest appearances leaves behind an album that sounds like fragments of a worthy follow-up in many ways, with smile-inducing tracks like "Subways," which borrows huge chunks of Chandra's song of the same name, soundtracks for daydreams ("Sunshine"), and short sampledelic bits that end too quickly. It's a shame the group didn't expand on these self-contained songs more, leave off the pasted-in vocals that clutter things up and detract from the magic in the grooves, and build them into something more like Since I Left You. By focusing on outsiders instead of trusting their crate-digging genius, the Avalanches shortchanged themselves and ended up making the best psychedelic Chemical Brothers album ever instead of making another classic Avalanches album. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 11 de diciembre de 2020 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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After inducing the overstimulated feeling of rebounding in a carnival from heartbreak (Since I Left You) and soundtracking a summertime caravan across their native Australia (Wildflower), the Avalanches looked to space for their third album. More specifically, Robbie Chater and Toni Di Blasi became fascinated with the Golden Record, a kind of time capsule aboard NASA's Voyager spacecraft. Plans for a spoken contribution from the creative director of the Voyager Interstellar Message Project, Ann Druyan, fell through, but that's her on the album cover, her image from a television screen snapped by a camera and processed through a spectrograph. Druyan's brain waves, recorded as she thought about Carl Sagan -- with whom she worked and fell in love during the project -- are on the Golden Record. It's that "cosmic love story," as Chater put it, that guided the making of We Will Always Love You. Yet another emotional roller coaster, this is the Avalanches' longest one yet, accommodating around 20 riders -- a number of featured artists that exceeds that of Wildflower -- and samples numbering in the hundreds. There is a strong connection to the previous trip with the Rivers Cuomo-fronted kaleidoscopic pop nugget "Running Red Lights," a desperate romantic chase scene in which Pink Siifu also recites slightly remixed lyrics written by late Wildflower contributor David Berman: "I sleep three feet above the street/In a pink champagne Corvette/Fly out into space/Listen to the music the stars are making/Without a flicker of regret." Those lines are representative of an album where so much happens -- in painstakingly connected and sometimes overlapping fashion -- that dozens of listens are required to process all the information. Cola Boyy and Mick Jones transmit from the indie disco of an interplanetary craft to pay tribute to Karen Carpenter on "We Go On." Perry Farrell, backed by a spectral choir, does his musical healer thing, singing about love and light on another loping dancefloor groove. The biggest triumph is probably the graceful fusion of a looped line from the Alan Parsons Project's anti-surveillance soft-rock classic "Eye in the Sky" with a genuinely consoling original vocal from Leon Bridges, heard in the chugging "Interstellar Love." The album's stronger dancefloor emphasis in relation to Wildflower is also felt throughout "The Divine Chord," a collaboration with MGMT and Johnny Marr that evokes the same twirling, heart-aflutter daze as "Since I Left You." Another clever aspect of the album is that the Avalanches make room for artists whose solo debuts made splashes big enough to be measured against all subsequent output. In addition to Sananda Maitreya (formerly known as Terence Trent D'Arby) and Tricky, there's Neneh Cherry, provider of the most urgent vocal through "Wherever You Go," a call for togetherness with roots in early Chicago house. Overall, the guest artists are more attuned here with Chater and Di Blasi, who were seemingly burdened much more by sample licensing than by commercial expectations. Pocket some tissue and hold tight. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electrónica - Publicado el 4 de junio de 2021 | XL Recordings

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 16 de abril de 2001 | XL Recordings

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 11 de diciembre de 2020 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

After inducing the overstimulated feeling of rebounding in a carnival from heartbreak (Since I Left You) and soundtracking a summertime caravan across their native Australia (Wildflower), the Avalanches looked to space for their third album. More specifically, Robbie Chater and Toni Di Blasi became fascinated with the Golden Record, a kind of time capsule aboard NASA's Voyager spacecraft. Plans for a spoken contribution from the creative director of the Voyager Interstellar Message Project, Ann Druyan, fell through, but that's her on the album cover, her image from a television screen snapped by a camera and processed through a spectrograph. Druyan's brain waves, recorded as she thought about Carl Sagan -- with whom she worked and fell in love during the project -- are on the Golden Record. It's that "cosmic love story," as Chater put it, that guided the making of We Will Always Love You. Yet another emotional roller coaster, this is the Avalanches' longest one yet, accommodating around 20 riders -- a number of featured artists that exceeds that of Wildflower -- and samples numbering in the hundreds. There is a strong connection to the previous trip with the Rivers Cuomo-fronted kaleidoscopic pop nugget "Running Red Lights," a desperate romantic chase scene in which Pink Siifu also recites slightly remixed lyrics written by late Wildflower contributor David Berman: "I sleep three feet above the street/In a pink champagne Corvette/Fly out into space/Listen to the music the stars are making/Without a flicker of regret." Those lines are representative of an album where so much happens -- in painstakingly connected and sometimes overlapping fashion -- that dozens of listens are required to process all the information. Cola Boyy and Mick Jones transmit from the indie disco of an interplanetary craft to pay tribute to Karen Carpenter on "We Go On." Perry Farrell, backed by a spectral choir, does his musical healer thing, singing about love and light on another loping dancefloor groove. The biggest triumph is probably the graceful fusion of a looped line from the Alan Parsons Project's anti-surveillance soft-rock classic "Eye in the Sky" with a genuinely consoling original vocal from Leon Bridges, heard in the chugging "Interstellar Love." The album's stronger dancefloor emphasis in relation to Wildflower is also felt throughout "The Divine Chord," a collaboration with MGMT and Johnny Marr that evokes the same twirling, heart-aflutter daze as "Since I Left You." Another clever aspect of the album is that the Avalanches make room for artists whose solo debuts made splashes big enough to be measured against all subsequent output. In addition to Sananda Maitreya (formerly known as Terence Trent D'Arby) and Tricky, there's Neneh Cherry, provider of the most urgent vocal through "Wherever You Go," a call for togetherness with roots in early Chicago house. Overall, the guest artists are more attuned here with Chater and Di Blasi, who were seemingly burdened much more by sample licensing than by commercial expectations. Pocket some tissue and hold tight. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 22 de julio de 2020 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 14 de septiembre de 2020 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 20 de febrero de 2020 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Electrónica - Publicado el 1 de julio de 2001 | XL Recordings

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 18 de marzo de 2020 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 29 de octubre de 2020 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Electrónica - Publicado el 8 de abril de 2021 | XL Recordings

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Electrónica - Publicado el 2 de mayo de 2021 | XL Recordings

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Electrónica - Publicado el 6 de febrero de 2001 | XL Recordings

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Rock - Publicado el 27 de octubre de 2009 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1963 | Star Records

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 14 de septiembre de 2020 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Electrónica - Publicado el 3 de diciembre de 2001 | XL Recordings

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 22 de julio de 2020 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 20 de febrero de 2020 | Universal Music Australia Pty. Ltd.