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R&B - Publicado el 17 de junio de 2011 | Blues Babe Records

Premios 4F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
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R&B - Publicado el 17 de junio de 2011 | Blues Babe Records

Premios 4F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
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R&B - Publicado el 24 de julio de 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic

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R&B - Publicado el 28 de septiembre de 2018 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

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R&B - Publicado el 31 de agosto de 2004 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Four long years after the issue of Who Is Jill Scott?: Words and Sounds, Vol. 1, the woman returns. Scott has retained a good portion of her team from her debut, like Steve McKeever and co-executive producer Jazzy Jeff Townes. Larry Gold is still in charge of the elegant string arrangements, Andre Harris and Vidal Davis are still here in the rhythm section, and there are others. But there are some top-flight guests here as well, including the great jazz trumpeter Nicholas Payton, Raphael Saadiq, and songwriter and pianist Peter Kuzma, just to name a few. Musically, Scott strolls and swaggers joyously in the no man's land between soul, funk, jazz, and, of course, those swinging hip-hop beats. The spoken word interludes that were so prescient on her debut are all but absent here; Beautifully Human is a singer's record. And what a singer! Scott cites Minnie Riperton once more in her thank-yous. One can feel the presence of that influence here, gracing the shimmering grooves in "My Petition" and "Spring Summer Feeling." But lest the listener think this is all sweetness and light, one must remember the artist's considerable lyrical flair that goes for the grain of the matter, whether that be in the heart, the heavens, or the pit of love's belly. The latter track -- with all of its beautiful strings and acoustic guitars floating, hovering, and gently rolling under the singer's voice -- is punctured by crooned lines like "...it takes more than diamonds/To get me wet." On the laid-back hip-hop manifesto of "I'm Not Afraid," Scott poetically (what else?) lays out not only her sexuality but her spirit, one informing the other, speaking of herself as a free individual who is a willing partner in union in eros, spirit, and everyday life. When it gets to the handclapped silvery funk of "Golden," Scott offers another manifesto, one of accepting life on its own terms and making it hers. She once again evokes the paradoxes in relationships, where -- despite her autonomy -- she needs her partner, not for anything but love. The slippery-slope 4/4 backbeat and winding acoustic guitars flow around the singer as she lets her sweet honeyed voice seep into her lyric. Likewise, the jazz piano and loop of "Cross My Mind" show another side of that same equation as the singer alternately speaks and sings her desire. "Bedda at Home" is the steamy midnight queen funk-soul cut. It's not only in the pocket; its groove is infectious. The sound-effected Motown-kissed soul/hip-hop weave of "Family Reunion" is bittersweet, full of wisdom and rough tenderness. Ultimately, Beautifully Human is an even stronger recording than its predecessor. It's seamless in its construction, unlittered in its production, honestly and elegantly articulated in its poetic soul, and utterly intoxicating in its groove consciousness. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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R&B - Publicado el 18 de julio de 2000 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Though start-up label Hidden Beach and its manufacturer/distributor Sony may have been hoping for another Lauryn Hill in this eloquent young African-American from a Middle Atlantic state, Jill Scott turns out to be something of a hip-hop Patti Smith, a street poet who, on her first album, hasn't quite made the transition from spoken word performances to music, despite an excellent singing voice. With any luck, she will retain her sense of the power of words, since the best parts of this album are the ones when she lets fly, drunk on her verbal virtuosity. Producer Jeff Townes (of DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince fame) and his team of associates from the A Touch of Jazz production company set up sympathetic musical backgrounds for Scott that support her without requiring her to fit her spoken and sung excursions into strict meter. That gives her range to pursue her interests, which include a strong sense of her north Philadelphia neighborhood and such idiosyncratic concerns as food, with many meals listed in detail. But the album has a story to tell, and for the most part it is a love story. Scott describes a relationship from many different angles, including an encounter with her boyfriend's ex in a super market ("Exclusively") and her warnings to that girl (or some other) to stay away ("Gettin' in the Way"). She also breaks painfully from an old boyfriend in favor of the new one ("I Think It's Better"), but mostly she celebrates the relationship ("A Long Walk," "He Loves Me (Lyzel in E Flat)," "It's Love," "The Way"). But with "Honey Molasses," things turn sour, and on "Love Rain" and "Slowly Surely," she frees herself, concluding that "One Is the Magic #" and toward the end of the album moving on to social concerns with "Watching Me" and "Brotha." This narrative structure gives Scott ample room to express a variety of emotions and to display her "verbal elation." Like many poets, she sometimes delights in a torrent of words for their own sake, but it's hard to fault her when the result is such a fully articulated world view. There is no existing slot in R&B/hip-hop into which this album fits, which only means a new one will have to be created. (The CD marks a new complexity in the use of bonus and hidden tracks. After the 17th track, "Show Me," there are 26 four-second blank tracks, followed by a 44th track, the bonus song, "Try." One minute after this song ends, there is a hidden selection, an alternate version of "Love Rain" that features Mos Def.) © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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R&B - Publicado el 24 de julio de 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic

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R&B - Publicado el 20 de noviembre de 2001 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

What you think of Jill Scott's second album, Experience: Jill Scott 826+, is going to depend on how you define the two-hour, double-disc set. Is it, as its title suggests, a live album (recorded mostly on August 26, 2001, in Washington, D.C., hence the "826") plus a bonus disc containing some new studio tracks? Or is it a new studio album with a live disc tacked on? There aren't many artists who can justify the release of a live album after releasing only one studio album, especially when the live album consists almost entirely of material from that one album. The draw here, however, is Scott herself. A performing poet-turned-singer, she clearly knows how to please an audience, and the Washingtonians seem primed, frequently singing along to her songs without prompting and cheering many aspects of the show that can't be appreciated on a mere audio recording of it. If Scott's debut disc found her still in transition from the spoken word to the sung song, she has long since made that shift, and the album is full of vocal pyrotechnics, though, as she herself acknowledges, she talks a lot, even coming off like a standup comic in her defense of her song "Gettin' in the Way." The conceptual unity that tied these songs together on Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1 is missing here, but there's no denying Scott's effectiveness as a performer. The "+" disc, however, sounds like a collection of demos for her next album rather than a stand-alone document, even before the extended hidden tracks at the end present alternate versions. (Don't believe the one-minute-and-48-second time listed for the last track; it really runs over 16 minutes.) So, let's call this a satisfying live album with some bonus tracks, a good seasonal stocking-stuffer. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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R&B - Publicado el 26 de abril de 2011 | Blues Babe Records

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R&B - Publicado el 25 de septiembre de 2007 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

The photos on the cover and within the booklet of The Real Thing: Words and Sounds, Vol. 3 do not match the music. Does Jill Scott really have to hail a cab? Is she really awakened in the middle of the night by the need to write songs with an anguished look on her face? Really? Because these songs sound like they were written as she was fed chocolate-dipped strawberries while sprawled out on a bed cloaked with rose petals. Well, that's not entirely true -- there are some exceptions, like the furious "Hate on Me," and a couple songs involving deep heartache and sharp admonishments. For the most part (and considerably more so than Scott's first two studio albums), however, The Real Thing is for romancing couples. While some of the collaborators -- Andre Harris, Vidal Davis, Adam Blackstone -- are all over the singer's past releases, there's a handful of relatively new and significant associates, most notably JR Hutson. (Presumably the son of '70s soul great Leroy Hutson, he is listed as "L. Hutson, Jr." in the songwriting credits.) Hutson and Scott co-wrote four of the album's sweetest and steamiest songs, most of which have a few things in common with mid-'70s albums involving any combination of Minnie Riperton, Leon Ware, and Marvin Gaye. 4hero's "Les Fleurs" cover aside, "Come See Me" is the closest anyone has come to channeling Minnie, updating the slowest, most sensual sides of Perfect Angel and Adventures in Paradise. On the other hand, "Crown Royal" maintains that gooey, slightly sleazed-out sound of Marvin's I Want You while dispensing with the double entendres of that touchstone; Scott gets as erotic as ever, even raunchy at points, while making it all sound like poetry instead of straight smut. It's almost like she heard Janet Jackson's Damita Jo and figured, "Yeah, that's nice, but I can do it about ten times better." © Andy Kellman /TiVo

R&B - Publicado el 16 de junio de 2015 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

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R&B - Publicado el 20 de noviembre de 2001 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

What you think of Jill Scott's second album, Experience: Jill Scott 826+, is going to depend on how you define the two-hour, double-disc set. Is it, as its title suggests, a live album (recorded mostly on August 26, 2001, in Washington, D.C., hence the "826") plus a bonus disc containing some new studio tracks? Or is it a new studio album with a live disc tacked on? There aren't many artists who can justify the release of a live album after releasing only one studio album, especially when the live album consists almost entirely of material from that one album. The draw here, however, is Scott herself. A performing poet-turned-singer, she clearly knows how to please an audience, and the Washingtonians seem primed, frequently singing along to her songs without prompting and cheering many aspects of the show that can't be appreciated on a mere audio recording of it. If Scott's debut disc found her still in transition from the spoken word to the sung song, she has long since made that shift, and the album is full of vocal pyrotechnics, though, as she herself acknowledges, she talks a lot, even coming off like a standup comic in her defense of her song "Gettin' in the Way." The conceptual unity that tied these songs together on Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1 is missing here, but there's no denying Scott's effectiveness as a performer. The "+" disc, however, sounds like a collection of demos for her next album rather than a stand-alone document, even before the extended hidden tracks at the end present alternate versions. (Don't believe the one-minute-and-48-second time listed for the last track; it really runs over 16 minutes.) So, let's call this a satisfying live album with some bonus tracks, a good seasonal stocking-stuffer. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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House - Publicado el 8 de agosto de 2016 | T's Box

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R&B - Publicado el 17 de marzo de 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic

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R&B - Publicado el 22 de abril de 2011 | Blues Babe Records

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Soul - Publicado el 30 de agosto de 2011 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

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R&B - Publicado el 25 de septiembre de 2007 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

The photos on the cover and within the booklet of The Real Thing: Words and Sounds, Vol. 3 do not match the music. Does Jill Scott really have to hail a cab? Is she really awakened in the middle of the night by the need to write songs with an anguished look on her face? Really? Because these songs sound like they were written as she was fed chocolate-dipped strawberries while sprawled out on a bed cloaked with rose petals. Well, that's not entirely true -- there are some exceptions, like the furious "Hate on Me," and a couple songs involving deep heartache and sharp admonishments. For the most part (and considerably more so than Scott's first two studio albums), however, The Real Thing is for romancing couples. While some of the collaborators -- Andre Harris, Vidal Davis, Adam Blackstone -- are all over the singer's past releases, there's a handful of relatively new and significant associates, most notably JR Hutson. (Presumably the son of '70s soul great Leroy Hutson, he is listed as "L. Hutson, Jr." in the songwriting credits.) Hutson and Scott co-wrote four of the album's sweetest and steamiest songs, most of which have a few things in common with mid-'70s albums involving any combination of Minnie Riperton, Leon Ware, and Marvin Gaye. 4hero's "Les Fleurs" cover aside, "Come See Me" is the closest anyone has come to channeling Minnie, updating the slowest, most sensual sides of Perfect Angel and Adventures in Paradise. On the other hand, "Crown Royal" maintains that gooey, slightly sleazed-out sound of Marvin's I Want You while dispensing with the double entendres of that touchstone; Scott gets as erotic as ever, even raunchy at points, while making it all sound like poetry instead of straight smut. It's almost like she heard Janet Jackson's Damita Jo and figured, "Yeah, that's nice, but I can do it about ten times better." © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Soul - Publicado el 25 de septiembre de 2007 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

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CD11,99 €

R&B - Publicado el 18 de julio de 2000 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Though start-up label Hidden Beach and its manufacturer/distributor Sony may have been hoping for another Lauryn Hill in this eloquent young African-American from a Middle Atlantic state, Jill Scott turns out to be something of a hip-hop Patti Smith, a street poet who, on her first album, hasn't quite made the transition from spoken word performances to music, despite an excellent singing voice. With any luck, she will retain her sense of the power of words, since the best parts of this album are the ones when she lets fly, drunk on her verbal virtuosity. Producer Jeff Townes (of DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince fame) and his team of associates from the A Touch of Jazz production company set up sympathetic musical backgrounds for Scott that support her without requiring her to fit her spoken and sung excursions into strict meter. That gives her range to pursue her interests, which include a strong sense of her north Philadelphia neighborhood and such idiosyncratic concerns as food, with many meals listed in detail. But the album has a story to tell, and for the most part it is a love story. Scott describes a relationship from many different angles, including an encounter with her boyfriend's ex in a super market ("Exclusively") and her warnings to that girl (or some other) to stay away ("Gettin' in the Way"). She also breaks painfully from an old boyfriend in favor of the new one ("I Think It's Better"), but mostly she celebrates the relationship ("A Long Walk," "He Loves Me (Lyzel in E Flat)," "It's Love," "The Way"). But with "Honey Molasses," things turn sour, and on "Love Rain" and "Slowly Surely," she frees herself, concluding that "One Is the Magic #" and toward the end of the album moving on to social concerns with "Watching Me" and "Brotha." This narrative structure gives Scott ample room to express a variety of emotions and to display her "verbal elation." Like many poets, she sometimes delights in a torrent of words for their own sake, but it's hard to fault her when the result is such a fully articulated world view. There is no existing slot in R&B/hip-hop into which this album fits, which only means a new one will have to be created. (The CD marks a new complexity in the use of bonus and hidden tracks. After the 17th track, "Show Me," there are 26 four-second blank tracks, followed by a 44th track, the bonus song, "Try." One minute after this song ends, there is a hidden selection, an alternate version of "Love Rain" that features Mos Def.) © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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R&B - Publicado el 29 de abril de 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic