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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 6 de febrero de 2012 | Wichita Recordings

Premios 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 1 de abril de 2014 | Wichita Recordings

Premios Pitchfork: Best New Music
Considering that Cloud Nothings sprang from Dylan Baldi's gloriously unruly teenage angst, it could be damning with faint praise to say that Here and Nowhere Else is his most considered set of songs yet. However, the album's maturity reveals itself in the attitude behind the music more than in the music itself. Baldi and company temper the tantrums of Attack on Memory just enough to tell a tale of personal and musical growth. Where that album was full of showy ambition and peaks and valleys, Here and Nowhere Else is a heads-down set of songs. From its rolling beat to Baldi's more relaxed vocals, "Now Hear In" sets the easier, more natural tone for the rest of the album. A few bravado moments remain, most notably "Pattern Walks," which could be a kissing cousin to Attack on Memory with its seven-minute length, tangled guitars, and ecstatic keyboards. Still, the band spends more time crafting the kind of hooky yet angry insights that have made their best songs special since the beginning; the sweet harmonies carry just as much weight as the heavy guitar, drums, and bass on songs like "Quieter Today," which could be the album's manifesto. John Congleton's hissy production borders on lo-fi, which is used too often as a signifier for deeply felt emotions. It actually works here, forcing listeners to crank up the volume and lean in to Baldi's screams. Here and Nowhere Else offers ample proof that Cloud Nothings aren't too mature and considered to really let it rip on "Just See Fear" and "Giving Into Seeing," both of which build to truly chaotic fury topped by Baldi's raw-throated howling (however, drummer Jayson Gerycz is the band's true MVP, driving the album's dramatic dynamic shifts with ease). Throughout these songs, the band examines the gulfs between people with the kind of furious apathy and emphatic ambivalence that makes them the heirs to '80s and '90s masters like the Replacements, Green Day, and Nirvana without seeming overly derivative. Here and Nowhere Else closes with "I'm Not Part of Me," which sings the praises of bridging those gulfs instead of burning bridges. It's a hopeful, if not exactly happy, ending to an album about being in it for the long haul. Call it sustainable punk -- the kind that doesn't need to burn out or fade away. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 26 de febrero de 2021 | Carpark Records

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 29 de enero de 2021 | Carpark Records

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 19 de octubre de 2018 | Wichita Recordings

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Over the years, Cloud Nothings have collaborated with different producers to dive into different sides of their music. Respectively, Steve Albini and John Congleton emphasized the band's rough edges on Attack on Memory and Here and Nowhere Else, while John Goodmanson cleaned them up slightly on Life Without Sound. For their fifth album, Cloud Nothings recruited Randall Dunn, known for his work with Sunn O))) among other righteously heavy acts. While Last Burning Building isn't their transformation into a metal band, Dunn's expertise at making loud bands sound great helps Cloud Nothings bring the rawness of their concerts into the studio. At times, Last Burning Building resembles an especially well-recorded live album in how well it captures the band's dynamics. After a decade of screaming his lungs out, Dylan Baldi's voice is a well-earned, well-worn rasp that Dunn doesn't shy away from on pop-inclined songs like "Leave Him Now" and "Another Way of Life" or moodier tracks such as "In Shame" and "Offer an End." It's a sound that's just as vital to Cloud Nothings' music as in-the-red guitars and frantic drumming, both of which are on full display starting with the blazing opener "On an Edge," which is the closest they've come to matching the intensity of their hardcore influences. The heft Dunn brings to the band's sound is perfect for "The Echo of the World," where climactic riffs elevate the song to towering proportions, while their mix of distortion and soul-searching has rarely sounded as effortless as it does on "So Right So Clean." Likewise, Last Burning Building's extra muscle helps the ten-minute centerpiece "Dissolution" keep listeners riveted from start to finish. Five albums in, Cloud Nothings version of maturing is to go harder and louder than ever -- and they sound all the better for it. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 27 de enero de 2017 | Wichita Recordings

After the ragged angst of their last two albums, it's not surprising that Cloud Nothings opt for a lighter approach on Life Without Sound -- if only to give Dylan Baldi's vocal cords a much-needed break. On their fifth album, Baldi and company sand off some of the rough edges that defined Attack on Memory and Here and Nowhere Else, and more often than not, it adds nuance to the tug of war between defiance and acceptance that drives their music. However, smoother sounds don't always mean a smoother outlook, and Life Without Sound finds Baldi soundtracking his quarter-life crisis with songs that try to reconcile past with present, youth with growth, and grit with polish. "Up to the Surface" begins the album with piano, an instrument that is often overused by rock bands to convey thoughtful maturity, but coupled with the track's heavy drums and Baldi's gravelly baritone when he sings "I knew peace in the terror of the mind," Cloud Nothings actually do sound thoughtful and mature as they contemplate the moment when abandonment turns into letting go. Helping the band achieve this perspective is producer John Goodmanson, whose work with Death Cab for Cutie feels like a major influence. If Attack on Memory and Here and Nowhere Else built on '90s grunge, then Life Without Sound could be seen as carrying on the tradition of neatened-up early-2000s indie, when acts like Death Cab and Modest Mouse made it big. Though the resemblance is closest on "Modern Act," the album's glossiest moment, the chiming melodies that steered Baldi through his crises since Turning On also take the lead on "Internal World" and "Things Are Right with You," where the chorus "Feel right/feel lighter" feels like a mantra. Cloud Nothings don't forsake fiery outbursts entirely; "Darkened Rings" could have appeared on Here and Nowhere Else. Still, songs like the darkly cathartic finale "Realize My Fate" and "Strange Year," a tangle of recrimination and regret that boasts the album's most throat-shredding vocals, aren't quite as raw as they could have been, emphasizing how the band's focus has shifted. By letting go of a little of their rage, Cloud Nothings let more light and shadow into Life Without Sound with promising results. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 17 de noviembre de 2020 | Carpark Records

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 24 de enero de 2012 | Cloud Nothings Records

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 1 de abril de 2014 | Cloud Nothings Records

Considering that Cloud Nothings sprang from Dylan Baldi's gloriously unruly teenage angst, it could be damning with faint praise to say that Here and Nowhere Else is his most considered set of songs yet. However, the album's maturity reveals itself in the attitude behind the music more than in the music itself. Baldi and company temper the tantrums of Attack on Memory just enough to tell a tale of personal and musical growth. Where that album was full of showy ambition and peaks and valleys, Here and Nowhere Else is a heads-down set of songs. From its rolling beat to Baldi's more relaxed vocals, "Now Hear In" sets the easier, more natural tone for the rest of the album. A few bravado moments remain, most notably "Pattern Walks," which could be a kissing cousin to Attack on Memory with its seven-minute length, tangled guitars, and ecstatic keyboards. Still, the band spends more time crafting the kind of hooky yet angry insights that have made their best songs special since the beginning; the sweet harmonies carry just as much weight as the heavy guitar, drums, and bass on songs like "Quieter Today," which could be the album's manifesto. John Congleton's hissy production borders on lo-fi, which is used too often as a signifier for deeply felt emotions. It actually works here, forcing listeners to crank up the volume and lean in to Baldi's screams. Here and Nowhere Else offers ample proof that Cloud Nothings aren't too mature and considered to really let it rip on "Just See Fear" and "Giving Into Seeing," both of which build to truly chaotic fury topped by Baldi's raw-throated howling (however, drummer Jayson Gerycz is the band's true MVP, driving the album's dramatic dynamic shifts with ease). Throughout these songs, the band examines the gulfs between people with the kind of furious apathy and emphatic ambivalence that makes them the heirs to '80s and '90s masters like the Replacements, Green Day, and Nirvana without seeming overly derivative. Here and Nowhere Else closes with "I'm Not Part of Me," which sings the praises of bridging those gulfs instead of burning bridges. It's a hopeful, if not exactly happy, ending to an album about being in it for the long haul. Call it sustainable punk -- the kind that doesn't need to burn out or fade away. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 25 de enero de 2011 | Wichita Recordings

“I get old so fast,” Dylan Baldi sings at one point on Cloud Nothings. It makes sense that he’s feeling the change from adolescence to adulthood particularly strongly: Baldi has been so prolific in such a short time, cranking out several EPs and an album’s worth of music within a couple of years, that it’s easy to forget that this is his official debut album. These tracks are more polished than what came before, but only to a point; unlike some lo-fi bands who graduated to unrecognizably slick full-fledged albums, Baldi cleans up Cloud Nothings' act only enough to get his songs across more clearly. But even if this album was produced, mixed, and mastered by professionals, there’s still an old-school, lo-fi vibe to Baldi's music. Like Male Bonding and Best Coast, Cloud Nothings excel at noisy rock that cloaks deceptively innocent, heartfelt melodies. Baldi is young enough to get away with lyrics as simple as “I don’t understand love/And I don’t understand at all,” while punk putdowns like “Not Important” still cast him as an outsider, even if he’s no longer in high school. Though the half-baked experiments that filled out Baldi's EPs are missing this time around, quickies such as “Heartbeat” and “Rock” show that he still has room for off-the-cuff outbursts. Though Cloud Nothings is more focused than his previous releases, Baldi still goes in lots of different directions, from the pure power pop of “All the Time” to “You’re Not That Good at Anything”'s snarling garage punk to the surprisingly sweet and optimistic “Should Have.” Meanwhile, songs like “On the Radio” and “Nothing’s Wrong” serve up bouncy punk-pop without the machismo that style developed in the ‘90s and 2000s. However, Baldi's best songs have a thoughtful undercurrent that separate him from the noise pop pack, whether it’s “Forget You All the Time”'s heartbreak detritus, or “Been Through”'s empathy. The way he blazes through so many songs in such a short space is a little overwhelming, but Cloud Nothings is a solid step forward for Baldi as he gets ready for what comes after teenage wasteland. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 18 de agosto de 2014 | Wichita Recordings

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 2 de febrero de 2021 | Carpark Records

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 13 de octubre de 2020 | Carpark Records

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 1 de septiembre de 2013 | Old Flame Records

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 25 de enero de 2011 | Cloud Nothings Records

“I get old so fast,” Dylan Baldi sings at one point on Cloud Nothings. It makes sense that he’s feeling the change from adolescence to adulthood particularly strongly: Baldi has been so prolific in such a short time, cranking out several EPs and an album’s worth of music within a couple of years, that it’s easy to forget that this is his official debut album. These tracks are more polished than what came before, but only to a point; unlike some lo-fi bands who graduated to unrecognizably slick full-fledged albums, Baldi cleans up Cloud Nothings' act only enough to get his songs across more clearly. But even if this album was produced, mixed, and mastered by professionals, there’s still an old-school, lo-fi vibe to Baldi's music. Like Male Bonding and Best Coast, Cloud Nothings excel at noisy rock that cloaks deceptively innocent, heartfelt melodies. Baldi is young enough to get away with lyrics as simple as “I don’t understand love/And I don’t understand at all,” while punk putdowns like “Not Important” still cast him as an outsider, even if he’s no longer in high school. Though the half-baked experiments that filled out Baldi's EPs are missing this time around, quickies such as “Heartbeat” and “Rock” show that he still has room for off-the-cuff outbursts. Though Cloud Nothings is more focused than his previous releases, Baldi still goes in lots of different directions, from the pure power pop of “All the Time” to “You’re Not That Good at Anything”'s snarling garage punk to the surprisingly sweet and optimistic “Should Have.” Meanwhile, songs like “On the Radio” and “Nothing’s Wrong” serve up bouncy punk-pop without the machismo that style developed in the ‘90s and 2000s. However, Baldi's best songs have a thoughtful undercurrent that separate him from the noise pop pack, whether it’s “Forget You All the Time”'s heartbreak detritus, or “Been Through”'s empathy. The way he blazes through so many songs in such a short space is a little overwhelming, but Cloud Nothings is a solid step forward for Baldi as he gets ready for what comes after teenage wasteland. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 28 de marzo de 2011 | Carpark

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 13 de agosto de 2018 | Wichita Recordings

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 18 de septiembre de 2018 | Wichita Recordings

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 9 de octubre de 2018 | Wichita Recordings

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 1 de octubre de 2014 | Polyvinyl Records