Su carrito está vacío

Categorías :

Artistas similares

Los álbumes

A partir de:
CD8,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 13 de junio de 2011 | naïve

Libreto Premios 3F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
A partir de:
CD12,49 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 7 de abril de 2003 | Parlophone (France)

Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz
A partir de:
HI-RES1,94 €
CD1,29 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 10 de junio de 2013 | naïve

Hi-Res Premios Hi-Res Audio
A partir de:
HI-RES21,49 €
CD14,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 3 de julio de 2020 | Polydor

Hi-Res
Después de su díptico argentino (Palermo Hollywood en 2016 y Volver en 2017), se esperaba a Benjamin Biolay en el punto de inflexión. En la encrucijada entre el rock impetuoso y el pop orquestal sofisticado, la pista Idéogrammes ilustra con precisión el estado de ánimo del cantante. Como a un piloto de Fórmula 1, a Biolay le gusta ponerse en peligro, tanto a través de letras íntimas como de música atrevida, mezclando brillantemente varias influencias. “En un Gran Premio, pasas por todas las emociones a una velocidad fenomenal”, dice el cantante. Con sus letras que evocan la muerte y su radiante música (tanto en la melodía como en los arreglos), la canción Grand Prix es el símbolo de este enfoque en suscitar emociones. Escrita mucho antes de que se concibiera el álbum (en 2014, poco después del fatal accidente de Jules Bianchi en el Gran Premio de Suzuka en Japón), también hace una sutil alusión a Françoise Hardy, que actuó en la película Grand Prix (1966) de John Frankenheimer.Además, encontramos todas las obsesiones de Biolay: la ruptura en Vendredi 12 y su suave ironía, la nostalgia en Interlagos (Saudade) (tema llamado así por el circuito brasileño de Fórmula 1), el paso del tiempo en la melancólica La roue tourne, el deseo de ternura y euforia en Où est passé la tendresse?... El álbum hace esta otra pregunta: Comment est ta peine? Esta referencia a How Deep is Your Love de The Rapture describe perfectamente la persona de Biolay - el romántico autodestructivo rozando el fondo, sin llegar a tocarlo realmente (“Comment est ta peine? / La mienne est comme ça / La mienne est comme ça / Faut pas qu’on s’entraîne / À toucher le bas”). Finalmente, mencionemos las discretas intervenciones de tres actores muy queridos por él: Anaïs Demoustier en Papillon noir y Comment est ta peine?, Chiara Mastroiani en La roue tourne y Visage pâle y Melvil Poupaud en Interlagos. En cuanto a la imprescindible Keren Ann, aparece en Souviens-toi l’été dernier. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
A partir de:
CD8,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 21 de junio de 2010 | naïve

A partir de:
HI-RES19,49 €
CD13,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 16 de noviembre de 2018 | Universal Music Division Polydor

Hi-Res
A partir de:
HI-RES17,49 €
CD12,49 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 22 de abril de 2016 | Universal Music Division Polydor

Hi-Res Libreto
There is no question that Benjamin Biolay is heir to Serge Gainsbourg's nouvelle chanson throne. Five of his previous six albums have re-created it in his own image, using everything from canny angular pop, punk, and skittering Euro funk to electro, Saravah soul, cafe jazz, and ye-ye while remaining devoted to the sophisticated gospel of Gainsbourg. Palermo Hollywood is a trademark Biolay album, chock-full of his irony, wicked wit, offbeat sensuality, and irresistible, catchy melodies and arrangements. But it is also something other. Most of it was cut in the Buenos Aires district the album was titled after, a haunt for many ex-pat Europeans amid glorious old world architecture and subterranean street life. Biolay has a small apartment there. Using Argentine musicians as well as his usual stable in France, he delivers many of these songs with a new array of rhythms that include cumbia and tango. He co-wrote several songs with Uruguayan/Argentinian actress/vocalist Sofia Wilhelmi. She duets on the single "Palermo Queens" and on the accordion-fueled cumbia-cum-tarantella-cum-rock tune "Palermo Soho." On the former, his protagonist is a romantically rejected flaneur who drinks and smokes too much in an effort to hide his heartbreak. In the latter, he is drunk too, but he takes in the decadent street scene and celebrates it matter of factly. Passion and pleasure may seem journalistic here, but they are overflowing; an excess of desire is all in the lyric puns. "La Noche Ya No Existe" is an electro-dancehall cumbia with mariachi horns performed in duet with Alika, the Uruguayan reggae star. It juxtaposes romance under a big sky in a world destroyed by multinational corporations. "Tendresse Année Zéro" is a gorgeous spoken word poem about loving and losing, with drum loops, strings, hand percussion, and analog synths creating a sonic panorama for pre-dawn romantic anguish. The brief "Borges Futbol Club" is a hazy, jazz waltz with lush strings, whistling, and a killer bassline, offset by the sampled sound of a soccer announcer raving about a goal. "Pas Sommeil" is a long, groovy, modern chanson that serves as an anthem for Biolay's eternal ne'er do well who calmly -- and unrepentantly -- narrates his many losses in life. The music fuses luxuriant cinematic strings to a spaghetti western melodic theme infused with a Bach organ fugue and squalling electric rock guitars and drums. Already heady with tones and textures, Jorge Luis Borges is sampled reading one of his poems. "Pas Di'ci" combines new wave and stadium rock tropes in a grand chanson frame. Palermo Hollywood is an expansion of Biolay's musical palette. Like Gainsbourg, he relentlessly explores new sounds in which to frame his lyrics and melodies. His consummate skill in assembling the familiar with the exotic goes beyond anything he's done before. He poetically renders his non-committal, willing societal rejects and anti-heros as three-dimensional characters who speak effortlessly, as the listener hums along, often nodding in assent. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
A partir de:
CD17,49 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 7 de mayo de 2001 | Parlophone (France)

A partir de:
HI-RES17,49 €
CD12,49 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 20 de abril de 2017 | Universal Music Division Polydor

Hi-Res Libreto
Once the enfant terrible of French chanson, Benjamin Biolay is now in his mid-forties. In addition to being one of his country's most acclaimed singer songwriters, he is also a celebrated film actor and and fashion icon. He has spent a decade living in the funky Argentinian artist's neighborhood, Palermo Hollywood, which he paid tribute to on his last album. Volver (Spanish for "come back") is, appropriately, a formal sequel and a further homage to Argentina. It is marked by an even more ambitious array of styles -- from cumbia and hip-hop to rock, funk, nouveau (or, perhaps post-modern) chanson and more, but this assemblage is less carefully constructed, and thank goodness, though it will likely be more controversial for French listeners. Biolay's sonic restlessness is tempered only by his punk rock attitude. He commences the set with a cinematic ballad in the title track, lamenting his bitter, aging gigolo's status: "I want to do just as the rich do/Cursing those at the bottom...Life does not like it when/We look her right in her eyes...." He counters it with the irony in "Encore Encore!" -- a campy, Blondie -esque, love-stricken rock & roll duet with his ex-wife Chiara Mastroianni. She is not the only guest on this 15-song set, either. Rapper Sofia Wilhelmi reprises her role from Palermo Hollywood on the steamy tropical cumbia "Ça Ole Bas," while the grand dame of French cinema, Catherine Deneuve, appears on the breezy disco of "Happy Hour" that denigrates France for living on the reputation of its excesses rather than on the excesses themselves. Speaking of disco, Biolay gets backing from the ever funky Illya Kuryaki & the Valderramas on "Roma (Amor)" that nods at Federico Fellini's 8½ had it been scored by Cerrone. Cumbia meets cafe rap on the half-spoken/half-sung "Pardonnez-Mo" featuring Miss Bolivia. Despite the many guest spots, though, Biolay manages just fine on his own. Check the sweet, exotic flavor of Cuban son, reggae, chanson, and funk in "Mala Siempre" -- its production aesthetic includes layered organs, strings, Auto-Tuned backing vocals, and loops. Likewise the bumping Morricone-esque guitars, disco bassline, rumbling low-end drums, and Biolay's cool, raspy singing make "L'alcool, L'absence" one of the album's many delights -- the honking baritone sax solo is a nice touch to boot. On the ballad "Arrivederci," Biolay sounds like Iggy Pop from Preliminaires -- or is the other way around? On "La Memorie," orchestral strings in waltz time meet a nylon-string guitar as Biolay tortures himself with a tender recollection: "...the few evenings when memory recreates your little black dress and your mole...." The musical narratives on Volver reflect in humorous -- and, of course, gauche -- detail that Biolay's protagonists remain unrepentant and will take any chance at all to repeat their long history of decadent behavior. (Check the dissolute soul-boy sleaze in "Hypertranquille.") They see that the Faustian bargain with the devil is about to come due, but there remains (a little) more playtime. Volver is a wonderful sequel to Palermo Hollywood to be sure, but it's so much more: it stands on its own as more evidence of Biolay's mature (and trademark) post-everything pop aesthetic. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
A partir de:
CD14,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 21 de mayo de 2001 | Parlophone (France)

A partir de:
HI-RES17,49 €
CD12,49 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 15 de junio de 2015 | Universal Music Division Polydor

Hi-Res Libreto
Benjamin Biolay reveals that he is no longer the enfant terrible of modern indie chanson as he pays affectionate, wry, classy tribute to Charles Trenet, the iconic singer- songwriter often credited as the creator of nouvelle chanson. Singing and playing piano, Biolay offers up 12 songs by Trenet, most well-known, but not overly familiar -- he obviously avoids "La Mer," since it has already been covered some 400 times. He is accompanied by ace Belgian guitarist/bassist Nicolas Fiszman (Philip Catherine, Jacques Higelin, Alain Bashung, Charles Aznavour) and drummer Denis Benarrosh (Véronique Sanson, Claude Nougaro, Francis Cabrel, as well as occasional strings, winds, and hand percussion when warranted-- check the lithe, "Le Piano de la Plage." One of the most ubiquitous songs here is "Que reste-t-il de nos amours?," where the guitar is answered by the piano's high register, setting forth the sparse, forlorn melody, before giving way to languid, lush pop, illustrated by the hovering full string section around Biolay's sultry voice. His reading of "Le Grande Cafe" juxtaposes a jaunty cut-time swing--complete with flügelhorn--and a serious lyric tone. "Revoir Paris" is unadulterated luxury in its sad, intimate homage to the City of Lights; his dusky, melancholy vocal is underscored by the piano slicing through the lush, romantic strings like butter. Vanessa Paradis appears on "Ja'ia Ta Main," orchestrated by warm strings, celeste, and a trumpet playing its best Chet Baker. Biolay does without granting himself too many liberties; he respects the organic beauty in these songs--the bluesy "Verlaine" is a fine example. His grainy yet airy baritone remains faithful to both the singer and songwriter. Biolay contributes one of own numbers to the end of the album as a further tribute. "Chanson du Faussaire" emulates Trenet's signature melodic and rhythmic style with an exclamation point, but the vocal styling remains the composer's. Fans of Biolay's earlier recordings --particularly Rose Kennedy --will find this just as enchanting, if not as bracing as Vengeance. Fans of Trenet can expect not only a worthy tribute, but an excellent extension of the chanson lineage. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
A partir de:
CD8,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 5 de noviembre de 2012 | naïve

A partir de:
CD9,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 25 de marzo de 2005 | Parlophone (France)

A partir de:
CD17,49 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 7 de abril de 2003 | Parlophone (France)

A partir de:
CD14,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 3 de julio de 2020 | Universal Music Division Polydor

Después de su díptico argentino (Palermo Hollywood en 2016 y Volver en 2017), se esperaba a Benjamin Biolay en el punto de inflexión. En la encrucijada entre el rock impetuoso y el pop orquestal sofisticado, la pista Idéogrammes ilustra con precisión el estado de ánimo del cantante. Como a un piloto de Fórmula 1, a Biolay le gusta ponerse en peligro, tanto a través de letras íntimas como de música atrevida, mezclando brillantemente varias influencias. “En un Gran Premio, pasas por todas las emociones a una velocidad fenomenal”, dice el cantante. Con sus letras que evocan la muerte y su radiante música (tanto en la melodía como en los arreglos), la canción Grand Prix es el símbolo de este enfoque en suscitar emociones. Escrita mucho antes de que se concibiera el álbum (en 2014, poco después del fatal accidente de Jules Bianchi en el Gran Premio de Suzuka en Japón), también hace una sutil alusión a Françoise Hardy, que actuó en la película Grand Prix (1966) de John Frankenheimer.Además, encontramos todas las obsesiones de Biolay: la ruptura en Vendredi 12 y su suave ironía, la nostalgia en Interlagos (Saudade) (tema llamado así por el circuito brasileño de Fórmula 1), el paso del tiempo en la melancólica La roue tourne, el deseo de ternura y euforia en Où est passé la tendresse?... El álbum hace esta otra pregunta: Comment est ta peine? Esta referencia a How Deep is Your Love de The Rapture describe perfectamente la persona de Biolay - el romántico autodestructivo rozando el fondo, sin llegar a tocarlo realmente (“Comment est ta peine? / La mienne est comme ça / La mienne est comme ça / Faut pas qu’on s’entraîne / À toucher le bas”). Finalmente, mencionemos las discretas intervenciones de tres actores muy queridos por él: Anaïs Demoustier en Papillon noir y Comment est ta peine?, Chiara Mastroiani en La roue tourne y Visage pâle y Melvil Poupaud en Interlagos. En cuanto a la imprescindible Keren Ann, aparece en Souviens-toi l’été dernier. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
A partir de:
HI-RES19,49 €
CD13,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 16 de noviembre de 2018 | Universal Music Division Polydor

Hi-Res
A partir de:
HI-RES17,49 €
CD12,49 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 22 de abril de 2016 | Universal Music Division Polydor

Hi-Res Libreto
There is no question that Benjamin Biolay is heir to Serge Gainsbourg's nouvelle chanson throne. Five of his previous six albums have re-created it in his own image, using everything from canny angular pop, punk, and skittering Euro funk to electro, Saravah soul, cafe jazz, and ye-ye while remaining devoted to the sophisticated gospel of Gainsbourg. Palermo Hollywood is a trademark Biolay album, chock-full of his irony, wicked wit, offbeat sensuality, and irresistible, catchy melodies and arrangements. But it is also something other. Most of it was cut in the Buenos Aires district the album was titled after, a haunt for many ex-pat Europeans amid glorious old world architecture and subterranean street life. Biolay has a small apartment there. Using Argentine musicians as well as his usual stable in France, he delivers many of these songs with a new array of rhythms that include cumbia and tango. He co-wrote several songs with Uruguayan/Argentinian actress/vocalist Sofia Wilhelmi. She duets on the single "Palermo Queens" and on the accordion-fueled cumbia-cum-tarantella-cum-rock tune "Palermo Soho." On the former, his protagonist is a romantically rejected flaneur who drinks and smokes too much in an effort to hide his heartbreak. In the latter, he is drunk too, but he takes in the decadent street scene and celebrates it matter of factly. Passion and pleasure may seem journalistic here, but they are overflowing; an excess of desire is all in the lyric puns. "La Noche Ya No Existe" is an electro-dancehall cumbia with mariachi horns performed in duet with Alika, the Uruguayan reggae star. It juxtaposes romance under a big sky in a world destroyed by multinational corporations. "Tendresse Année Zéro" is a gorgeous spoken word poem about loving and losing, with drum loops, strings, hand percussion, and analog synths creating a sonic panorama for pre-dawn romantic anguish. The brief "Borges Futbol Club" is a hazy, jazz waltz with lush strings, whistling, and a killer bassline, offset by the sampled sound of a soccer announcer raving about a goal. "Pas Sommeil" is a long, groovy, modern chanson that serves as an anthem for Biolay's eternal ne'er do well who calmly -- and unrepentantly -- narrates his many losses in life. The music fuses luxuriant cinematic strings to a spaghetti western melodic theme infused with a Bach organ fugue and squalling electric rock guitars and drums. Already heady with tones and textures, Jorge Luis Borges is sampled reading one of his poems. "Pas Di'ci" combines new wave and stadium rock tropes in a grand chanson frame. Palermo Hollywood is an expansion of Biolay's musical palette. Like Gainsbourg, he relentlessly explores new sounds in which to frame his lyrics and melodies. His consummate skill in assembling the familiar with the exotic goes beyond anything he's done before. He poetically renders his non-committal, willing societal rejects and anti-heros as three-dimensional characters who speak effortlessly, as the listener hums along, often nodding in assent. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
A partir de:
CD20,49 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 23 de noviembre de 2011 | Parlophone (France)

A partir de:
CD13,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 16 de noviembre de 2018 | Universal Music Division Polydor

A partir de:
CD9,99 €

Chanson francesa - Publicado el 8 de junio de 2004 | Bambi Rose