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CD19,99 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 23. September 2011 | Columbia - Legacy

Ab
CD14,49 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 1. Mai 1992 | Columbia

Soul Asylum's breakthrough, million-selling Grave Dancers Union yielded the mega-hit "Runaway Train" and put the band in a whole new league; longtime fans were predictably disappointed with the slick results. This is a solid alternative rock record with singer/songwriter/vocalist Dave Pirner upfront, a role he was built for but always seemed to resist until this clear do-or-die moment for the band. Soul Asylum did; however, they never matched the success or consistency of this album. Tracks like "Home Sick" and "New World" bear the roots of the country-rock revival later forged by Son Volt and Wilco, while the angst-ridden "Somebody to Shove" is pure joy Soul Asylum-style. © Denise Sullivan /TiVo
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CD6,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. August 2002 | Ryko - Rhino

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CD14,49 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 6. Juni 1995 | Columbia

The guys in Soul Asylum are the everymen of flannel-shirt twang, jangle and crunch. They're a little bit country-rock and a little bit heavy-metal roll, a little bit Springsteen factory and a little bit Westerberg High, a little bit barking dog and a little bit hurt puppy. They started out as near-hardcore Minneapolis punksters, and, following the typical route of Midwestern flannel, will probably end up as a rockin' country band. But on LET YOUR DIM LIGHT SHINE, Soul Asylum are at their own dead center, where they're capable of making everything sound like a classic pop song, and making any classic pop song sound like it was born in a flannel shirt. That is, they sound pretty much like they did on GRAVE DANCERS UNION, the 1992 album that served as their commercial breakthrough. Echoes of fellow Minnesota rockers of all stripes ring throughout LET YOUR DIM LIGHT SHINE. "Bittersweetheart" opens with the big guitar of mid-'80s Replacements, while "Crawl" starts out sounding like a burnt-out downer from the 'Mats' later years. But like all the songs on LET YOUR DIM LIGHT SHINE, they invariably reach for their pop centers. "Bittersweetheart," therefore, breaks into a candy-coated chorus, while "Crawl" opts to speed up and go metallic. "To My Own Devices" and "Promises Broken" are brooding, country-influenced acoustic tunes meant for singing in harmony, around a fireplace, while drinking your sorrows away--in other words, Jayhawks songs. Soul Asylum manage to knit a singular pop-rock sound out of all that yarn--a warm and sad guitar texture that is, despite its roots, specifically Soul Asylum's. The opening track, "Misery," is a satiric attack on an industry that makes fortunes off other people's misfortunes: "They say misery loves company/We could start a company and make misery/Frustrated Incorporated." But it's also a de facto tribute to what Soul Asylum do best: turning the indie-rock angst of the heartland into pop-rock songs for everybody. © TiVo
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CD11,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 17. April 2020 | Blue Elan Records

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HI-RES12,59 €
CD9,99 €

Pop/Rock - Erschienen am 18. März 2016 | eOne Music

Hi-Res Booklet
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CD14,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1988 | A&M

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HI-RES18,99 €
CD15,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 4. Mai 2018 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res
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CD13,99 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2012 | Savoy

Soul Asylum may have been the little Minneapolis band that could, the snotty underdogs who ended up topping the charts while their hipper peers did not, but in true underdog fashion, success didn't seem to suit them. Sure, 1992's Grave Dancer's Union was a massive hit, but the follow-up, 1995's Let Your Dim Light Shine, was perceived as a flop even though it went platinum as the band's snarky energy began to fade, and both 1998's Candy from a Stranger and the 2006 "comeback" The Silver Lining barely made a ripple among anyone but their most committed fans, both sounding half-hearted as Dave Pirner's songwriting turned unexpectedly silly. In 2012, Soul Asylum are pretty much off everyone's radar and they're back to recording for a small indie label, so it makes a certain sense that Delayed Reaction is their best album in ages. Anyone hoping this will recall the band's creative zenith of Hang Time or Grave Dancer's Union may be a bit let down, but the band has some semblance of their scrappy energy back, and songs like "Gravity," "The Streets," "Let's All Kill Each Other," and "Take Manhattan" sound energetic, focused, and fun, full of the qualities that made Soul Asylum good, rowdy fun before they hit the charts and had to figure out what to do next. The band isn't quite as good when they slow things down and try to convince us of their range, but "Cruel Intentions" is a surprisingly successful bit of cocktail lounge blues, "Into the Light" is solid pop songcraft, and strip the pretentious string charts from "I Should've Stayed in Bed" and you'd have a better-than-average moody grunge ballad. And while Dave Pirner's lyrics are still goofier than they were in his heyday, he sounds noticeably more grounded on The Silver Lining, and the band -- Pirner and Dan Murphy on guitars, Tommy Stinson on bass, and Michael Bland on drums -- rocks with solid assurance and a genuine sense of fun. Calling Delayed Reaction the best Soul Asylum album since Let Your Dim Light Shine might sound like damning with faint praise, given how spotty much of their post-Grave Dancer's Union catalog has been, but the truth is, this band hasn't sounded this enjoyable since the mid-'90s, and if it isn't a full-scale return to form, it shows they aren't a spent force, which is certainly how they sounded on The Silver Lining. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD14,49 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 1. Februar 1993 | Columbia

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CD14,49 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 10. Januar 2004 | Columbia - Legacy

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CD14,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1990 | A&M

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CD5,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1994 | Columbia - Legacy

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CD14,49 €

Pop/Rock - Erschienen am 26. Oktober 2012 | Legacy - CBS - Sony

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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 25. November 1986 | Ryko - Rhino

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CD2,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 16. Oktober 2020 | Blue Elan Records

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CD16,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 18. Januar 1986 | Ryko - Rhino

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CD5,99 €

Rock - Erschienen am 9. Juli 2021 | Legacy Recordings

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CD14,49 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 1. Mai 1992 | Columbia

Soul Asylum's breakthrough, million-selling Grave Dancers Union yielded the mega-hit "Runaway Train" and put the band in a whole new league; longtime fans were predictably disappointed with the slick results. This is a solid alternative rock record with singer/songwriter/vocalist Dave Pirner upfront, a role he was built for but always seemed to resist until this clear do-or-die moment for the band. Soul Asylum did; however, they never matched the success or consistency of this album. Tracks like "Home Sick" and "New World" bear the roots of the country-rock revival later forged by Son Volt and Wilco, while the angst-ridden "Somebody to Shove" is pure joy Soul Asylum-style. © Denise Sullivan /TiVo
Ab
CD14,49 €

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 12. Mai 1998 | Columbia

With Let Your Dim Light Shine, Soul Asylum hit the skids, unintentionally spinning into middle-of-the-road territory. It was an uninspired and careerist record, one that dropped off the charts as quickly as it entered, tarnishing the group's image, both as alternative heroes and hitmakers. For their follow-up, Candy From a Stranger, Soul Asylum stubbornly continued in the post-Tom Petty mainstream rock tradition that marked their first two albums for Columbia. It only made sense -- a return to the sloppy rave-ups of Twin/Tone, or even their hard-rocking A&M records, would have seemed forced. And Candy From a Stranger is better than the near-disastrous Let Your Dim Light Shine, which was dogged by such embarrassments as "Misery." Nothing on Candy is as bad as "Misery," but there's another problem -- not many songs make an impression, either. This is pure, workmanlike rock & roll, which means it has to be well-crafted in order to succeed. Dave Pirner does have a couple of good songs -- "I Will Still Be Laughing" is a catchy, if restrained rocker, and "Blood Into Wine" is a fine slice of country-rock -- but too often his songwriting is simply colorless. As a result, Candy From a Stranger is a journeyman record -- an album that delivers the goods competently, but with no real flair or passion. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo