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Klassik - Erschienen am 4. Februar 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Auszeichnungen 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
The great Portuguese pianist Maria João Pires has issued some career-defining albums in the first years of the 21st century, and this 2013 album, covering perhaps Franz Schubert's two most ambitious sonatas, is certainly among them. It's a challenging yet sensuous performance with enough in it to reward many multiple hearings. The two sonatas are treated somewhat differently, but both readings find a midpoint between the big old-fashioned concert-hall Schubert and newer readings, often on historical instruments, that emphasize the intimate, somewhat intellectual nature of the circle for which Schubert composed a lot of his music. Pires delivers plenty of power, but these are at heart performances that delve deeply into the music. The Piano Sonata in B flat major, D. 960, is the more restrained of the two here, and that is in a sense its point: Pires gives shape to this gigantic work without ever raising her voice or resorting to grand gestures, and in so doing she creates music with a preternatural breathing quality and some really eerie effects as the harmony enters previously uncharted areas. In the Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845, there is greater dynamic range, but the emphasis is once again on long-range structure. The beginning is toned down and treated primarily as a kernel of motivic development as the opening movement proceeds. The purely lyric aspect is not absent from Pires' readings, but it is confined to discrete passages, which only makes it more effective. Listen to the absolutely magical trio of the scherzo of the A minor sonata, one of the most arresting treatments of this passage on recordings. Strongly recommended, and proof that there's life yet in the old model of major label and star pianist. © TiVo
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Klassik - Erschienen am 17. September 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Auszeichnungen 5 de Diapason
It's a recording that just a few years ago would have been mainstream: a "name" pianist (albeit one much less well known in the U.S. than elsehwere), who has been playing Mozart's piano concertos since childhood, joins forces with a name conductor with whom she has frequently collaborated, leading a modern-instrument orchestra of some 70 players, with the results released on a major international-conglomerate label. Now it's distinctly unusual. But lo, there's value in the old ways. Portuguese-Brazilian pianist Maria-João Pires is a lifelong Mozart specialist, but she still has new things to say in two of Mozart's most popular piano concertos. You can chalk it up to her Buddhist outlook if you like: her readings of the Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat major, K. 595, and Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K. 466, might be described as detached without being lifeless. Her approach is most startling in the Piano Concerto No. 20, where her no-drama shaping of the material runs sharply counter to type. Sample the piano's entrance in the first movement, where it offers a twisting, tense elaboration of the main theme that is far removed from its source material. Generally pianists use this to raise the tension level, but Pires lets the unusually shaped, chromatic line speak for itself with fine effect. In the Piano Concerto No. 27, Mozart's last, Pires emphasizes the music's evanescent quality in a really lovely, gentle performance. As for Abbado, he apparently failed to get the memo about how proper balance in Mozart's concertos is impossible with a large modern orchestra, for the interplay between Pires and his Orchestra Mozart Bologna is subtle and detailed. The only problem comes with Deutsche Grammophon's engineers, who give Pires' left hand too much prominence, perhaps more so in one of the recording's two locales (we don't learn which concerto was recorded in Bologna and which in Bolzano) than in the other. In general, an absolutely distinctive release of the old school. © TiVo
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Klassik - Erschienen am 23. Juni 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1996 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2006 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1995 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Oktober 1990 | Warner Classics International

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. April 1991 | Warner Classics International

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1994 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1994 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1990 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1989 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1996 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2001 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)