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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 28. Mai 2012 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 13. März 2012 | Silva Screen Records

The first thing that potential consumers should know about The Complete Harry Potter Film Music Collection is that all of the pieces are performed by the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, and not collected from the official film soundtracks, which were recorded under the watchful eyes and ears of composers John Williams, Patrick Doyle, Nicholas Hooper, and Alexandre Desplat. That said, the collection hits on all of the most important beats from each of the eight films, including multiple iterations of Williams' iconic "Hedwig's Theme" and the ambitious Prisoner of Azkaban highlight "Double Trouble," resulting in a listening experience that may not be entirely authentic, but satisfies nonetheless. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Original Soundtrack - Erschienen am 22. Juli 2014 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 17. Oktober 2006 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 7. Februar 2011 | Silva Screen Records

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Original Soundtrack - Erschienen am 20. April 2015 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 27. Juni 2007 | Silva Screen Records

Silva Screen Records specializes in re-recordings of film music, and the label usually employs a presumably non-union Eastern European orchestra, the City of Prague Philharmonic, to make those new versions of movie soundtracks. Then, Silva Screen generally lists the credit for the Prague on the back covers of its albums in small print, leaving the impression to the casual shopper that the discs contain actual soundtrack recordings. So, it is striking that a very different approach has been taken with the two-CD set Film Music of Hans Zimmer. Here, the Prague, along with Crouch End Festival Chorus, gets front-cover billing in the same size print as the album title. The ironic aspect to this is that the Prague doesn't actually play on all the tracks. But then, Zimmer didn't compose all of them, either. Both of these curiosities require explanation. The German-born Zimmer was, as of 2007, along with perhaps Danny Elfman, at the top of Hollywood's A-list of film composers; this album's producer/conductor/annotator James Fitzpatrick notes that 2003's The Last Samurai represented Zimmer's 100th film score, which is remarkable for a man who was born in 1957 and thus would have been only in his mid-forties at the time. A part of Zimmer's success has been his ability to mix traditional orchestral scoring with electronic music written for and performed on synthesizers. Zimmer has that most basic of qualities in a film composer, he is versatile. When it comes to re-creating his work, however, that can make things tricky for Silva Screen, and the label has addressed the problem by commissioning purely orchestral arrangements for music originally written for synthesizers and orchestra (selections from Gladiator, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, Pearl Harbor, The Last Samurai, The Thin Red Line, Hannibal, The Da Vinci Code, and Batman Begins). In other cases, some synthesizers have been brought in to augment the Prague to one extent or another. And then there are cues from Days of Thunder, Rain Man, Regarding Henry, and True Romance that do not feature the orchestra at all. They were created on synthesizer either by Mark Ayres or Dan Head. (In true Silva Screen fashion, this information is buried in small print in the CD booklet.) As to the music not actually written by Zimmer, Fitzpatrick refers to a "musical 'think tank'" Zimmer maintains for younger composers, whom he sometimes hires to write parts of his assigned scores. This is not actually so remarkable in itself; Hollywood lore suggests that, with the stringent deadlines for film scoring, busy composers often have farmed out work to others. What is notable is that Zimmer appears to be vigilant about crediting his assistants. With 100 scores from which to choose, Silva Screen succeeds in suggesting the range of Zimmer's work in these 23 selections from 18 of his films. There's a reason why he's the go-to guy for summer blockbusters, and you can hear it in his stirring music for movies like Pearl Harbor and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (although the somewhat more impressive music from Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl was actually written by Klaus Badelt). But Zimmer also has a feel for more intimate pictures like Driving Miss Daisy. And his rock background (he was once a member of the Buggles) can be heard in those synthesizer-only cues from Rain Man and Days of Thunder. So, the album works as a Zimmer sampler, but it does not constitute a Zimmer best-of, if only because there's so much left out, starting with his only Academy Award winner, The Lion King. Then there's As Good as It Gets, The Preacher's Wife, and on and on. It may take a while for the dust to settle and for history to decide which among Zimmer's hundred-and-counting scores are his best. For now, this album gives a sense of what he can do. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Original Soundtrack - Erschienen am 14. April 2017 | Silva Classics

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Original Soundtrack - Erschienen am 30. September 2013 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 29. Juli 1997 | Silva Screen Records

This 57-track, four-CD set running nearly four-and-three-quarters hours and containing re-recordings of music composed by Jerry Goldsmith (1929-2004) for film and television scores over a period of more than 40 years was compiled from previously released Silva Screen collections, notably the 1989 album Goldsmith Conducts Goldsmith by the Philharmonia Orchestra (originally on Decca but reissued by Silva Screen in 2002) and the 1998 two-CD set The Omen: The Essential Jerry Goldsmith Film Music Collection by the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra. As such, it is not the ideal Goldsmith album, despite its length, because there are odd repetitions and omissions. For example, Goldsmith's music for the TV series The Waltons is part of a medley of "Television Themes" performed by the Philharmonia Orchestra, but it also gets its own separate track performed by the Daniel Caine Orchestra. Similarly, musical excerpts from the Oscar-nominated films The Wind and the Lion, Poltergeist, and Papillon are part of a medley of "Motion Pictures" performed by the Philharmonia Orchestra, but there are also separate tracks for each score performed by the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra. Goldsmith was nominated for 18 Academy Awards (he won only for The Omen), and it's a shame his nominated scores are not better represented: The Boys from Brazil, Star Trek®: The Motion Picture, Under Fire, Basic Instinct, and L.A. Confidential all get tracks of their own; but A Patch of Blue, The Sand Pebbles, Patton, and Chinatown are represented only in medleys; and Freud, Planet of the Apes, Hoosiers, and Mulan are not heard at all. (For those keeping count, his 18th nomination was for the song "Ave Satani" from The Omen.) But even if there is too much of some scores and none of others, this album does give a good sense of Goldsmith as a composer. Running in roughly chronological order, it shows his versatility (sometimes derided as facelessness), which allowed him to adapt to changing musical trends from the early 1960s to the early 2001s. Goldsmith could hold his own against the classically influenced writers who preceded him, but he also kept pace with the pop-influenced, synthesizer-savvy young composers coming up behind him, and that is made clear in this sprawling compilation. © TiVo
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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 20. Oktober 2008 | Silva Screen Records

Few film series have captured the world’s imagination as much as the James Bond adventures with their exotic locations and explosive situations. The various composers responsible for the film series’ music dexterously place the listener in the middle of the action. The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra takes James Bond fans around the world and back again with this special two-CD collection. The set features 30 tracks spanning the 22 Bond films, and an exclusive essay booklet entitled JAMES BOND: A MUSICAL HISTORY, written by acclaimed Bond historians Geoff Leonard and Pete Walker. © TiVo
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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 7. Oktober 2003 | Silva Screen Records

Reynold da Silva's Silva Screen Records (of which Prime Time is an imprint) has devoted itself to new recordings of film music (usually, as here, performed by the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra), and its box set The Music of John Williams: 40 Years of Film Music, filling four CDs and running over three hours and 45 minutes, is one of its most ambitious efforts. That's appropriate for Williams, both because he is the most successful film composer of the 40-year period beginning in the early '60s and because his music is produced on such a large scale. Since the '70s, Williams has been associated with directors Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, and he has matched their blockbuster films with his large-scale scores, producing some of the most memorable themes of the era, including instantly recognizable music from Jaws, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and the Star Wars and Indiana Jones series. Spielberg and Lucas have often attempted to evoke the styles of the old serials of the '40s, such as Flash Gordon, but on an epic scale, and Williams has done much the same thing with his music, which owes little or nothing to the more jazz- and rock-influenced film composers of the '50s and '60s, and everything to the film composers of an earlier generation, such as Franz Waxman and Victor Young, with its sweeping orchestral statements, martial rhythms, and grandly ornamented melodies. Yet, like the directors, Williams does it all with a slight wink to the audience. This collection doesn't restrict itself to Williams' best-known work, but it does demonstrate that even in his lesser-known pieces, his style is often much the same. The overture from The Cowboys, for example, while employing some standard Western elements familiar from Hollywood movies of decades before, also has a hint of Star Wars. Even when he is scoring a more downbeat film like Born on the Fourth of July, Williams can't seem to help writing his usual uplifting music. Despite its length, this collection can't do more than offer excerpts of Williams' extensive work, but the sampling is representative, and the best of the composer's familiar themes is included. © TiVo
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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 20. März 2006 | Silva Screen Records

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Weihnachtsmusik - Erschienen am 30. Oktober 2015 | Silva Classics

Presented on two CDs, The Greatest Christmas Choral Classics is a collection of the most popular carols, hymns, and songs, performed in lavish arrangements by the Crouch End Festival Chorus and the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra. The first disc's program offers the best-known traditional carols, such as "We Wish You a Merry Christmas," "Carol of the Bells," "Hark, the Herald Angels Sing," "The First Nowell," "God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen," and "O Come, All Ye Faithful," while the second disc is a survey of popular Christmas standards, including "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," "White Christmas," "Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer," "I'll Be Home for Christmas," and several other favorites. This package is suitable as background music for holiday parties and other occasions that need a boost of Christmas cheer. © Blair Sanderson /TiVo
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Klassik - Erschienen am 20. November 2006 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 8. Februar 2005 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 3. Oktober 2006 | Silva Screen Records

Reynold da Silva's Silva Screen Records specializes in re-recordings of the scores of films, usually using the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra and, when choral parts are called for, Britain's Crouch End Festival Chorus. Silva Screen then packages and repackages the results in a variety of forms, including collections organized by composer or by some theme. Da Silva's concept for this particular compilation is simple: he has singled out a group of choral pieces, drawn from music written for or used in a wide range of films from Alfred Newman and Ken Darby's "Prelude" to How the West Was Won (1962) to Richard Harvey's "Kyrie for the Magdelene" from The Da Vinci Code (2006). At least from the selections here, it seems that when film composers write for choruses, for the most part they have one of two ideas in mind. Adapting their music from traditional choral styles, they are usually going for something inspiring, if not downright quasi-religious, in tone, or they are trying to scare the bejesus out of moviegoers. In the former category, a good example is Ennio Morricone's "On Earth as It Is in Heaven" from The Mission (1986), a film that, after all, concerns Jesuit missionaries. Perhaps the best example here of the latter is Jerry Goldsmith's "Suite" from The Omen (1976), for which annotator James Fitzpatrick thoughtfully prints a few lyrics, such as "Hail the anti-Christ, Hail Satan." (Why haven't those Christian fundamentalists who harried Ozzy Osbourne and Judas Priest ever gone after Goldsmith?) There are, however, exceptions to these generalizations. John Williams' setting for the poem "Dry Your Tears Afrika" from Amistad (1997) sounds influenced by Ladysmith Black Mambazo, and is warmer and more intimate than most of what is found on the album. And Danny Elfman does some characteristically off-beat and imaginative things with "Main Title & Ice Dance" from Edward Scissorhands (1990). But for the most part, the movie view of choirs, as represented here, seems to be that they exist to ooh and ahh or intone something that sounds like Latin to call down the wrath or the glory of God (or his counterpart) on the poor movie characters. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Original Soundtrack - Erschienen am 27. Mai 2013 | Silva Screen Records

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Original Soundtrack - Erschienen am 24. Juni 2016 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Erschienen am 3. August 1998 | Silva Screen Records

A beautifully performed and recorded collection of some of James Horner's best motion picture underscore work spread over two discs. While he is certainly derivative at times and has a severe tendency to recycle his own material as often as possible, there is no doubt that he can turn in a moving film score -- and easily adapt to romance, action, or grand ideas. The Enya-esque Titanic score aside (only two sections are included here), this well-chosen double set includes selections from Braveheart, Apollo 13, Star Trek II, Battle Beyond the Stars (its essential thematic predecessor), and even Red Heat and Commando. Also sampled is another favorite Horner score, The Rocketeer. © Steven McDonald /TiVo