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Jazz fusion & Jazz rock - Paru le 8 octobre 1976 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions Discothèque Idéale Qobuz - Hi-Res Audio
Avec trois albums au compteur, Stanley Clarke est déjà célébré comme LE grand bassiste électrique des seventies lorsque parait School Days en 1976. Mais c’est tout de même ce disque que ses aficionados chérissent le plus. Véritable traité de quatre-cordes, le virtuose originaire de Philadelphie offre ici tout l’éventail de sa technique. Le groove est évidemment au cœur des débats et même lorsqu’il déballe son impressionnante pyrotechnie, la musicalité et l’inspiration restent toujours de mise. John McLaughlin, David Sancious, George Duke, Steve Gadd et Billy Cobham notamment comptent parmi les monstres qui ont fait déplacement pour épauler Stanley Clarke dans ce trip de jazz fusion renversant et furibard. Un classique du genre. © CM/Qobuz
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Jazz - Paru le 1 avril 2012 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Paru le 22 mai 2012 | Epic - Legacy

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Jazz fusion & Jazz rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1993 | Slamm Dunk - Epic

More than any other genre, jazz seems best suited for the live environment. An artist can improvise in the studio, certainly, but in concert a musician can ignore time limits and stretch creative possibilities. This is especially true of all-star collaborations; they can seem contrived or forced, but when chemistry exists between the players, the result is jazz in its purest, most exciting form. Such is the case on this disc, which features five contemporary giants: Clarke, Larry Carlton, Najee, Deron Johnson, and Billy Cobham. Seventy minutes for seven songs allows the players to interact and solo at length, stretching originals and Miles and Mingus covers to their limit. While each member is a monster improvisor, all base their musings on a definite wave of melodic brilliance. Najee is the real surprise here, as Clarke says in his liner notes. While the others are respected as top fusion cats, the saxman has always faced criticism for the commercialism of his albums; here, Najee proves he can blow with the best of them, getting the energy flowing on tracks like his own "Buenos Aires." Other highlights include the light intro "Minute By Minute," which L.C. popularized as an instrumental; Cobham's explosive "Stratus"; Carlton's simmering "Her Favorite Song"; and the final piece, an increasingly frenetic, 22-minute explosion of Clarke's classic "School Days." © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
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Jazz fusion & Jazz rock - Paru le 22 octobre 1997 | Epic

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Jazz - Paru le 29 mai 2015 | Epic - Legacy

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Jazz fusion & Jazz rock - Paru le 15 avril 2003 | Epic

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Jazz fusion & Jazz rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1993 | Epic

More than any other genre, jazz seems best suited for the live environment. An artist can improvise in the studio, certainly, but in concert a musician can ignore time limits and stretch creative possibilities. This is especially true of all-star collaborations; they can seem contrived or forced, but when chemistry exists between the players, the result is jazz in its purest, most exciting form. Such is the case on this disc, which features five contemporary giants: Clarke, Larry Carlton, Najee, Deron Johnson, and Billy Cobham. Seventy minutes for seven songs allows the players to interact and solo at length, stretching originals and Miles and Mingus covers to their limit. While each member is a monster improvisor, all base their musings on a definite wave of melodic brilliance. Najee is the real surprise here, as Clarke says in his liner notes. While the others are respected as top fusion cats, the saxman has always faced criticism for the commercialism of his albums; here, Najee proves he can blow with the best of them, getting the energy flowing on tracks like his own "Buenos Aires." Other highlights include the light intro "Minute By Minute," which L.C. popularized as an instrumental; Cobham's explosive "Stratus"; Carlton's simmering "Her Favorite Song"; and the final piece, an increasingly frenetic, 22-minute explosion of Clarke's classic "School Days." © Jonathan Widran /TiVo
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Jazz - Paru le 1 janvier 1975 | Epic - Legacy

It has often been said that Stanley Clarke did for the fretted electric bass in the 1970s what fellow virtuoso Jaco Pastorius did for the fretless. For any aspiring jazz-rock bassist coming up in the time between Bitches Brew and Feels So Good, Stanley's innovative playing, which combined a distinctive slap-pop style with fluid finger-style work informed by his acoustic playing, was a required assignment. Although School Days, with its catchy signature song, is perhaps the most listened to of his albums, it is on Journey to Love, Clarke's second solo offering for Columbia, that his muse is most confidently and persuasively displayed. He is assisted in this worthy endeavor by a whole carload of world-class talent. Jeff Beck shows up for two songs, the title track and the appropriately-titled "Hello Jeff." His lead guitar is as expressive and unpredictable as ever, capable of bringing a smile to the face of the most jaded listener. Return to Forever bandmates Chick Corea and Lenny White also turn up, as well as fellow traveler Mahavishnu John McLaughlin. Not to be overlooked are the tremendous talents of keyboardist George Duke, drummer Steve Gadd, and guitarist David Sancious. The caliber of the musicians aside, Journey of Love is full of great tunes, great grooves, and absolutely amazing bass playing. Clarke moves from percussive slapping to almost guitaristic chording to full-speed improvising with bewildering ease. Make no mistake about it, this is one of the finest fusion albums to come out of the 1970s, and it is the single best demonstration of the skills and the sound that make Clarke one of the most important figures to ever pick up the instrument. © Daniel Gioffre /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Paru le 24 août 1993 | Epic

Albums came less frequently from Stanley Clarke in the 1990s as film scores took up more and more of his time. Not only that, the ideas and functions of film music play a large role in East River Drive, where selections come as often as not in the form of cue-like vamps, as well as two actual themes from Clarke's scores for the films Poetic Justice and Boyz N the Hood. Oddly enough, Clarke's music benefits from his film immersion, for his compositional ideas are sharper and more sophisticated here, and he applies them to a range of electric music idioms. "Zabadoobeebe," "Illegal," and "I'm Home Africa" bear mild African influences, the elegant "Christmas in Rio" has a slight whiff of Brazil, and "Lords of the Low Frequencies" is an extraordinary slap-happy duel between Clarke and fellow virtuoso Armand Sabal-Lecco. As before, Clarke gets help from some of his famous friends -- among them are Gerald Albright, George Howard, Hubert Laws, Jean-Luc Ponty, Poncho Sanchez, and the inevitable George Duke -- and he most ably splits the string arranging tasks with George DelBarrio. This is a mature statement from a most accomplished musician, who was still young at 42. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Bandes originales de films - Paru le 7 juin 2019 | Node Records

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Bandes originales de films - Paru le 8 août 1995 | Epic Soundtrax

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Jazz - Paru le 16 octobre 2007 | Heads Up

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Jazz fusion & Jazz rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1988 | Columbia

This was bassist Stanley Clarke's twelfth solo set, and one of his very few that would be recommended to jazz (as opposed to funk and R&B) listeners. On the instrumental set, Clarke's bass is featured in a wide variety of settings, including duets with tap dancer Gregory Hines and drummer John Robinson, a quartet with Wayne Shorter ("Goodbye Pork Pie Hat"), in a power trio with guitarist Allan Holdsworth and drummer Stewart Copeland, a piece with George Duke (on acoustic piano for a change) and soprano saxophonist George Howard, a quartet with the synthesizers of Steve Hunt, and "Funny How Time Flies," which has a colorful Freddie Hubbard trumpet solo. Throughout, Clarke's bass has plenty of solo space, and he shows how strong a player he can be when given decent material. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Paru le 15 janvier 2014 | Kind of Blue Records

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Bandes originales de films - Paru le 8 août 1995 | Epic Soundtrax

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Jazz - Paru le 12 novembre 1985 | Epic

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Bandes originales de films - Paru le 22 avril 2016 | Sony Classical

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Jazz fusion & Jazz rock - Paru le 31 août 1991 | Epic

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Jazz - Paru le 22 mai 2012 | Epic - Legacy

L'interprète

Stanley Clarke dans le magazine
  • SMV, bêtes de basses
    SMV, bêtes de basses La dream team de la basse électrique fusion, Stanley Clarke, Marcus Miller et Victor Wooten, embrasera l’Olympia le 3 juillet. Feu !