Qobuz Store wallpaper
Catégories :
Panier 0

Votre panier est vide

Christian Scott - Yesterday You Said Tomorrow

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Yesterday You Said Tomorrow

Christian Scott

Livret numérique

Disponible en
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Musique illimitée

Écoutez cet album en haute-qualité dès maintenant dans nos applications

Démarrer ma période d'essai et lancer l'écoute de cet album

Profitez de cet album sur les apps Qobuz grâce à votre abonnement

Souscrire

Profitez de cet album sur les apps Qobuz grâce à votre abonnement

Téléchargement digital

Choisissez la qualité audio : 

Pour bénéficier de ce tarif, abonnez-vous à Sublime+

Langue disponible : anglais

Like Anthem, Christian Scott's 2007 post-Katrina meditation, Yesterday You Said Tomorrow is more than a collection of tunes; it's a statement. Scott, who was 26 at the time of this album's release, spells out his intention in the liner notes, where he explains that -- and he cites the 1960s work of Coltrane, Miles, Hendrix, Dylan, and Mingus as reference points -- he wanted to "create a record that has all the qualities of the documents of that era as they relate to our time by creating a palette that referenced the depth and conviction of the '60s in the context of subject matter and sound, but done in a way that illuminates the fact that my generation has had the opportunity to study the contributions of our predecessors, thus making our decision making process musically different." That's a pretty lofty goal (and a very long sentence), and a challenge to achieve, particularly with instrumental music. Scott pulls it off with aplomb though -- recorded by Rudy Van Gelder and produced by Chris Dunn and Scott, Yesterday You Said Tomorrow is very much a contemporary jazz album, yet it frequently touches down in that earlier, headier era, both sonically and in a more visceral, emotional sense. It's impossible, for example, not to notice the tonal similarities to Miles' work of the late '60s in Scott's trumpet playing, and the pacing and feisty overall attitude of several tracks is reminiscent of the more contemplative music of that time. Yet the rhythms and the setting belong to the present, with subtle and not-so-subtle influences from hip-hop, funk, and electronica finding their way into the mix. "K.K.P.D." (which Scott says stands for Ku Klux Police Department) launches it with a minute-plus of Matthew Stevens' swampy guitar run and Jamire Williams' manic drumming before Scott steps in to blow his first coolly muted solo. The piece becomes more aggressive as it unfolds, Milton Fletcher, Jr.'s piano and Kristopher Keith Funn's bass sending sparks in directions that often lead away from those Scott has chosen. "The Eraser," a song adapted from Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke's solo album of the same name, is smoother than the source material yet it's pervaded by a deliberate, somewhat unsettling scratchiness that signals the listener not to get too comfortable. The titles of some of the other tracks alone -- "Angola, LA & the 13th Amendment," "Jenacide (The Inevitable Rise and Fall of the Bloodless Revolution)," "American't" -- serve notice that this is a record that means business. On the latter, aimed at the negativity presently pervasive in the nation, Scott takes his time developing the melodic theme and musing introspectively as the other musicians build a solid foundation under him, while "Angola…" is a brooding, if occasionally angry exposition that doubles as a showcase for Stevens' tasteful licks. Stevens is also prominent throughout the record's closer, which he co-wrote with Scott, "The Roe Effect (Refrain in F# Minor)," a relatively stately, albeit at times unnerving commentary on the abortion issue. The track utilizes a backward recording technique in its latter half, ostensibly to juxtapose the opposing viewpoints on the charged issue, but also, one supposes, to remind the listener that the open-mindedness that goes into creating music as moving and commanding as this is also something we need to keep in the forefront as we find our way through these troubled times.
© Jeff Tamarkin /TiVo

Plus d'informations

Yesterday You Said Tomorrow

Christian Scott

launch qobuz app J'ai déjà téléchargé Qobuz pour Mac OS Ouvrir

download qobuz app Je n'ai pas encore téléchargé Qobuz pour Mac OS Télécharger l'app

Copier le lien pour partager la page

Vous êtes actuellement en train d’écouter des extraits.

Écoutez plus de 50 millions de titres avec votre abonnement illimité.

Écoutez cet album et plus de 50 millions de titres avec votre abonnement illimité.

1
K.K.P.D.
00:07:06

Rudy Van Gelder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Chris Dunn, Producer - Christian Scott, Producer, Trumpet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Jamire Williams, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Kristopher Keith Funn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Matthew Stevens, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Milton Fletcher, Jr., Piano, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2009 Concord Music Group Inc.

2
The Eraser
00:05:27

Thom Yorke, ComposerLyricist - Rudy Van Gelder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Chris Dunn, Producer - Christian Scott, Producer, Trumpet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Jamire Williams, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Kristopher Keith Funn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Matthew Stevens, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Milton Fletcher, Jr., Piano, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2009 Concord Music Group Inc.

3
After All
00:07:55

Rudy Van Gelder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Chris Dunn, Producer - Christian Scott, Producer, Trumpet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Jamire Williams, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Kristopher Keith Funn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Matthew Stevens, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Milton Fletcher, Jr., Piano, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2009 Concord Music Group Inc.

4
Isadora
00:06:13

Rudy Van Gelder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Chris Dunn, Producer - Christian Scott, Producer, Trumpet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Jamire Williams, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Kristopher Keith Funn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Matthew Stevens, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Milton Fletcher, Jr., Piano, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2009 Concord Music Group Inc.

5
Angola, LA & The 13th Amendment
00:08:40

Rudy Van Gelder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Chris Dunn, Producer - Christian Scott, Producer, Trumpet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Jamire Williams, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Kristopher Keith Funn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Matthew Stevens, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Milton Fletcher, Jr., Piano, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2009 Concord Music Group Inc.

6
The Last Broken Heart (Prop 8)
00:05:46

Rudy Van Gelder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Chris Dunn, Producer - Christian Scott, Producer, Trumpet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Jamire Williams, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Kristopher Keith Funn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Matthew Stevens, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Milton Fletcher, Jr., Piano, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2009 Concord Music Group Inc.

7
Jenacide (The Inevitable Rise and Fall Of The Bloodless Revolution)
00:06:50

Rudy Van Gelder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Chris Dunn, Producer - Christian Scott, Producer, Trumpet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Jamire Williams, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Kristopher Keith Funn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Matthew Stevens, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Milton Fletcher, Jr., Piano, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2009 Concord Music Group Inc.

8
American't
00:07:06

Rudy Van Gelder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Chris Dunn, Producer - Christian Scott, Producer, Trumpet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Jamire Williams, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Kristopher Keith Funn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Matthew Stevens, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Milton Fletcher, Jr., Piano, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2009 Concord Music Group Inc.

9
An Unending Repentance
00:09:40

Rudy Van Gelder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Chris Dunn, Producer - Christian Scott, Producer, Trumpet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Jamire Williams, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Kristopher Keith Funn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Matthew Stevens, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Milton Fletcher, Jr., Piano, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2009 Concord Music Group Inc.

10
The Roe Effect (Refrain In F# Minor)
00:03:23

Rudy Van Gelder, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Chris Dunn, Producer - Christian Scott, Producer, Trumpet, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - Jamire Williams, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Kristopher Keith Funn, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Matthew Stevens, Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Milton Fletcher, Jr., Piano, AssociatedPerformer

℗ 2009 Concord Music Group Inc.

Descriptif de l'album

Like Anthem, Christian Scott's 2007 post-Katrina meditation, Yesterday You Said Tomorrow is more than a collection of tunes; it's a statement. Scott, who was 26 at the time of this album's release, spells out his intention in the liner notes, where he explains that -- and he cites the 1960s work of Coltrane, Miles, Hendrix, Dylan, and Mingus as reference points -- he wanted to "create a record that has all the qualities of the documents of that era as they relate to our time by creating a palette that referenced the depth and conviction of the '60s in the context of subject matter and sound, but done in a way that illuminates the fact that my generation has had the opportunity to study the contributions of our predecessors, thus making our decision making process musically different." That's a pretty lofty goal (and a very long sentence), and a challenge to achieve, particularly with instrumental music. Scott pulls it off with aplomb though -- recorded by Rudy Van Gelder and produced by Chris Dunn and Scott, Yesterday You Said Tomorrow is very much a contemporary jazz album, yet it frequently touches down in that earlier, headier era, both sonically and in a more visceral, emotional sense. It's impossible, for example, not to notice the tonal similarities to Miles' work of the late '60s in Scott's trumpet playing, and the pacing and feisty overall attitude of several tracks is reminiscent of the more contemplative music of that time. Yet the rhythms and the setting belong to the present, with subtle and not-so-subtle influences from hip-hop, funk, and electronica finding their way into the mix. "K.K.P.D." (which Scott says stands for Ku Klux Police Department) launches it with a minute-plus of Matthew Stevens' swampy guitar run and Jamire Williams' manic drumming before Scott steps in to blow his first coolly muted solo. The piece becomes more aggressive as it unfolds, Milton Fletcher, Jr.'s piano and Kristopher Keith Funn's bass sending sparks in directions that often lead away from those Scott has chosen. "The Eraser," a song adapted from Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke's solo album of the same name, is smoother than the source material yet it's pervaded by a deliberate, somewhat unsettling scratchiness that signals the listener not to get too comfortable. The titles of some of the other tracks alone -- "Angola, LA & the 13th Amendment," "Jenacide (The Inevitable Rise and Fall of the Bloodless Revolution)," "American't" -- serve notice that this is a record that means business. On the latter, aimed at the negativity presently pervasive in the nation, Scott takes his time developing the melodic theme and musing introspectively as the other musicians build a solid foundation under him, while "Angola…" is a brooding, if occasionally angry exposition that doubles as a showcase for Stevens' tasteful licks. Stevens is also prominent throughout the record's closer, which he co-wrote with Scott, "The Roe Effect (Refrain in F# Minor)," a relatively stately, albeit at times unnerving commentary on the abortion issue. The track utilizes a backward recording technique in its latter half, ostensibly to juxtapose the opposing viewpoints on the charged issue, but also, one supposes, to remind the listener that the open-mindedness that goes into creating music as moving and commanding as this is also something we need to keep in the forefront as we find our way through these troubled times.
© Jeff Tamarkin /TiVo

À propos

Améliorer cette page album

Qobuz logo Pourquoi acheter sur Qobuz ?

Les promotions du moment...
A Love Supreme John Coltrane
80/81 Pat Metheny
À découvrir également
Par Christian Scott
The Enchanter-Hi! Christian Scott
Christian aTunde Adjuah Christian Scott
Anthem Christian Scott
Rewind That Christian Scott
Structure Christian Scott

Playlists

Dans la même thématique...
Just Coolin' Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers
Trapeze Noel Mcghie
Beautiful Vinyl Hunter Ashley Henry
Les Grands Angles...
Betty Davis, la panthère funk

Sans elle, point de Macy Gray, Erykah Badu, Amy Winehouse ou Janelle Monáe ! Disparue des radars depuis des années, Betty Davis reste la pionnière des soul sisters félines. La déesse funk par excellence. Egalement celle qui offrit l’électricité à un certain Miles Davis, dont elle sera l’éphémère épouse. Mais qui es-tu Betty ?

ECM en 10 albums

Le plus beau son après le silence. C’est la formule qui colle à la peau d’ECM depuis cinquante ans et la sortie du séminal « Free at Last » du Mal Waldron Trio, en novembre 1969. Manfred Eicher, le charismatique fondateur du label munichois, ne vit pas « hors du temps » mais plus précisément dans « un temps parallèle » à celui de la société, faisant d’ECM une planète de toute beauté où le jazz résonne autrement. Et c’est souvent pour ECM que Keith Jarrett, Charles Lloyd, Jan Garbarek, Chick Corea et tant d’autres ont enregistré leurs disques les plus intenses. Plus encore que pour Blue Note ou Impulse!, se limiter à 10 albums pour raconter toute l’histoire de ce label hors-norme est mission impossible. Aussi, les 10 sélectionnés raconteront « une » histoire d’ECM.

Frank Zappa, pour le meilleur et pour le rire

Plus les années passent depuis la disparition de Frank Zappa le 4 décembre 1993, plus son absence se fait cruellement sentir dans le panorama musical actuel. Non pas qu'on l'ait oublié, mais on cherchera en vain ceux qui peuvent prétendre l’égaler. Le génie aussi cosmique que comique de Frank Zappa n'a aucun équivalent aujourd'hui, car personne, depuis près de trois décennies, n’a été capable comme lui de conjuguer la plus grande exigence musicale avec un humour totalement décomplexé.

Dans l'actualité...