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Jazz - Released January 1, 2015 | Concord Jazz

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Sélection JAZZ NEWS - Grammy Awards
Throughout her career, Eliane Elias has delivered a steady stream of sophisticated, smartly conceived albums showcasing her adroit piano skills and delicate vocal style. Her 2015 effort, Made in Brasil, is no exception and finds her celebrating her Brazilian heritage with a handful of adeptly produced Bossa Nova and jazz songs. Once again working with longtime collaborators, producer Steve Rodby and husband/producer/bassist Marc Johnson, Elias continues to forge her own niche on Made in Brasil, combining jazz, both contemporary and straight-ahead, with her longstanding love of traditional and modern Brazilian styles of music. On her previous album, 2013's I Thought About You: A Tribute to Chet Baker, Elias stuck primarily to jazz standards of the '30s and '40s. Here, she flows easily between classic Bossa Nova songs by such legends as Antonio Carlos Jobim and Ary Barroso, as well as her own original compositions. Along with acoustic bassist Johnson, backing Elias here are electric bassist Marcelo Mariano, guitarist Marcus Teixeira, guitarist/vocalist Roberto Menescal, drummers Edu Barata and Rafael Barata, and percussionist Marivaldo dos Santos. Also showcased on this vocal-heavy album are singers Mark Kibble, Ed Motta, Amanda Brecker (Elias' daughter), and the vocal ensemble Take 6. Ultimately, as with most of Made in Brasil, tracks like "Aguas de Marco (Waters of March)" w/Take 6, "Incendiando," and "Vida (If Not You)," featuring a soulful performance from Motta, are sophisticated, lushly produced cuts that straddle the line between crisp Bossa Nova, sultry contemporary R&B, and glossy crossover jazz. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2015 | Concord Jazz

Booklet Distinctions Sélection JAZZ NEWS
Throughout her career, Eliane Elias has delivered a steady stream of sophisticated, smartly conceived albums showcasing her adroit piano skills and delicate vocal style. Her 2015 effort, Made in Brasil, is no exception and finds her celebrating her Brazilian heritage with a handful of adeptly produced Bossa Nova and jazz songs. Once again working with longtime collaborators, producer Steve Rodby and husband/producer/bassist Marc Johnson, Elias continues to forge her own niche on Made in Brasil, combining jazz, both contemporary and straight-ahead, with her longstanding love of traditional and modern Brazilian styles of music. On her previous album, 2013's I Thought About You: A Tribute to Chet Baker, Elias stuck primarily to jazz standards of the '30s and '40s. Here, she flows easily between classic Bossa Nova songs by such legends as Antonio Carlos Jobim and Ary Barroso, as well as her own original compositions. Along with acoustic bassist Johnson, backing Elias here are electric bassist Marcelo Mariano, guitarist Marcus Teixeira, guitarist/vocalist Roberto Menescal, drummers Edu Barata and Rafael Barata, and percussionist Marivaldo dos Santos. Also showcased on this vocal-heavy album are singers Mark Kibble, Ed Motta, Amanda Brecker (Elias' daughter), and the vocal ensemble Take 6. Ultimately, as with most of Made in Brasil, tracks like "Aguas de Marco (Waters of March)" w/Take 6, "Incendiando," and "Vida (If Not You)," featuring a soulful performance from Motta, are sophisticated, lushly produced cuts that straddle the line between crisp Bossa Nova, sultry contemporary R&B, and glossy crossover jazz. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Concord Jazz

Booklet
Pianist and vocalist Eliane Elias pays tribute to legendary jazz trumpeter/vocalist Chet Baker on her 2013 album I Thought About You. Featuring a selection of standards strongly associated with Baker, Elias mixes her native Brazilian bossa nova with swing, straight-ahead jazz, and even a few bluesy flourishes with much aplomb. The album, produced by Elias' husband, bassist Marc Johnson, also features guitarists Steve Cardenas and Oscar Castro-Neves, drummers Victor Lewis and Rafael Barata, and percussionist Marivaldo Dos Santos. Also adding more than a few moments of deft and thoughtful improvisation is trumpeter Randy Brecker. As Baker grew up listening to the music of the '30s and '40s, many of his own choices for songs to play were informed by the great songbook of those decades. Baker also had a natural inclination toward a pretty melody and romantic lyric and he never failed to pick great songs to perform. Subsequently, Baker's recordings showcase a superb batch of tunes to choose from. Elias, who has also leaned toward playing melodic, often romantic music, is a perfect conduit for reinterpreting Baker. Here she plays such songs as "There Will Never Be Another You," "Let's Get Lost," "Just Friends," "Embraceable You," and "I Get Along Without You Very Well." © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released August 30, 2019 | Concord Jazz

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Since moving to the United States in 1981, it was only in 2015 with Made in Brazil and again in 2017 with Dance of Time that Eliane Elias returned to her native Brazil to record the two albums. The São Paulo singer-pianist-composer’s strength lies in transporting the listener to the seductive atmospheres of Brazil, even when the repertoire is rather well-known… very well-known in fact. With this aptly named Love Stories, Elias showcases her skills not only as a brilliant jazz pianist and sensual singer but also as an arranger, composer and producer! Sung almost entirely in English, this 2019 vintage blends three original pieces with seven covers of hits from the golden age of bossa nova and the sixties, popularized by the likes of Antonio Carlos Jobim or Frank Sinatra. Despite this, Love Stories is not an excessively nostalgic record. This collection of love songs exhibits the timeless grace of songs from the 20th century by Jobim with the great arranger Claus Ogerman. And with the very popular (maybe too popular?) compositions, such as the theme from Francis Lai’s film Un homme et une femme, Eliane Elias once again succeeds in fascinating us. Subtlety, vulnerability, finesse, refinement and grace: the Paulista demonstrates why these words are so often attached to her name. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 24, 2017 | Concord Jazz

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | Blue Note Records

Eliane Elias is such a fine hard bop/post-bop pianist that it is a pity that she occasionally feels compelled to vocalize; her singing voice is small, quiet, and unimpressive. However, other than her brief vocals on "The Beat of My Heart," "I Fall in Love Too Easily," and "Blah Blah Blah," this is a strong trio set. Elias interacts with either the bass-drum team of Marc Johnson and Jack DeJohnette or Christian McBride and Carl Allen, with guitarist Rodney Jones just popping up briefly on one song. Elias' playing is often introspective, but always very expressive and she swings hard on the faster pieces. She is one of the underrated greats of the jazz piano. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Vocal Jazz - Released July 4, 2005 | Bluebird

Eliane Elias' second record for Bluebird is, like the previous Kissed by Nature, a vocal date intended for crossover audiences. Elias connects with her Brazilian pop heritage by choosing to sing, early on, a pair of Astrud Gilberto pieces, "Call Me" and "So Nice (Summer Samba)," both of which fortuitously suit the short range of her voice. Still, she speaks far more with a half-minute of piano soloing than she does with several minutes of vocal interpretation, and sounds far more comfortable taking an extra verse of the latter in Portuguese. Unlike the Gilberto tracks, Elias succeeds on two Antonio Carlos Jobim compositions, "Photograph" and the title song, her voice ironically betraying her in the same seductive fashion that Jobim himself made a hallmark. Her solos, though beautiful and contemplative, are short and usually hug the shore. As an overall musician, Elias has sure instincts when playing or singing, and compensates for her lack of vocal strength by rarely lingering on her notes. © John Bush /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 28, 2008 | Blue Note Records

Eliane Elias returns to the music of her native Brazil with this collection of bossa nova favorites, though there are a few American standards and pop songs recast as bossa novas as well. The pianist has grown in confidence as a vocalist over the course of several CDs, developing a sexy yet never overdone style that beautifully complements the music. With her husband Marc Johnson (who has also been her longtime bassist of choice), drummer Paulo Braga, either Oscar Castro-Neves or Ricardo Vogt on acoustic guitar, and a pair of guests, Elias proves herself as a talented singing pianist, effortlessly switching between English and Portuguese lyrics. Some of the tracks add string orchestrations, yet they never overwhelm the arrangements. Highlights include the easygoing rendition of "The More I See You," the relaxed and sensual treatment of "Estate (Summer)" (which adds Toots Thielemans on harmonica), "I'm Not Alone (Who Loves You?)" (which includes composer Ivan Lins in a vocal duet with Elias), and a surprisingly effective setting of Stevie Wonder's "Superwoman" (with Thielemans making another guest appearance). Eliane Elias remains one of the top bossa nova interpreters, in addition to her skills in many other jazz styles. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Vocal Jazz - Released April 3, 2004 | RCA Bluebird

Eliane Elias' second record for Bluebird is, like the previous Kissed by Nature, a vocal date intended for crossover audiences. Elias connects with her Brazilian pop heritage by choosing to sing, early on, a pair of Astrud Gilberto pieces, "Call Me" and "So Nice (Summer Samba)," both of which fortuitously suit the short range of her voice. Still, she speaks far more with a half-minute of piano soloing than she does with several minutes of vocal interpretation, and sounds far more comfortable taking an extra verse of the latter in Portuguese. Unlike the Gilberto tracks, Elias succeeds on two Antonio Carlos Jobim compositions, "Photograph" and the title song, her voice ironically betraying her in the same seductive fashion that Jobim himself made a hallmark. Her solos, though beautiful and contemplative, are short and usually hug the shore. As an overall musician, Elias has sure instincts when playing or singing, and compensates for her lack of vocal strength by rarely lingering on her notes. © John Bush /TiVo
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Vocal Jazz - Released August 22, 2006 | Bluebird

Eliane Elias has moved further and further into mainstream pop in recent years, and Around the City continues that course. Having begun as a member of the jazz ensemble Steps Ahead, she ventured tentatively into solo recordings in the late '80s, maintaining her solid commitment to jazz while never failing to bridge her adventurous tendencies with the Brazilian traditions that were her birthright. On recent albums she's been redefining herself, shifting from a role as a strictly instrumental musician to building a rep as a vocalist who (singing in both English and Portuguese) accompanies herself on piano and occasionally lets loose with a startling, stunning solo. Jazz and Brazil still figure largely into the makeup of her music ("Slide Show," "Chiclete Com Banana"), but sometimes just barely. Elias radically reinterprets Bob Marley's "Jammin'" as a nearly unrecognizable dance tune here, but she reclaims Beck's "Tropicalia" for Brazil -- a natural for Elias to cover, her take is faithful to the original's structure and brings to it a samba touch that Beck could only approximate. Her cover of Tito Puente's (by way of Santana) "Oye Como Va," on the other hand, sticks to the blueprint. Elias is writing more these days, too, to mixed results. "We're So Good," co-penned with co-producer Lester Mendez and songwriter Lauren Christy, sits firmly in Norah Jones territory, waiting for radio to discover it, while the album's two closing numbers, "Another Day" and "Segredos (Secrets), Pt. 2," both written by Elias solo, exude a melancholy bluesiness that confirms her growing talent as a cabaret-style singer/songwriter while leaving the listener with another hint that this artist is undergoing a continuing transformation. © Jeff Tamarkin /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Blue Note Records

Featuring tracks culled from eight of her albums, beginning fittingly enough with 1989's Eliane Elias Plays Jobim, Blue Note has compiled a strong collection of pianist Eliane Elias' Brazilian jazz cuts on Brazilian Classics. Elias' classically influenced touch is evident here on such standards as Antonio Carlos Jobim's "Chega de Saudade" and "One Note Samba," as well as her medley of Milton Nascimento works off her 1992 Fantasia release. While it would have been nice for Blue Note to include some rarities or alternate takes, as it stands Brazilian Classics works as a fitting representation of Elias' take on her home country's unique sound. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 13, 2018 | Concord Jazz

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Universal Music Group International

Brazilian jazz pianist, vocalist Eliane Elias' 2011 Concord Picante debut Light My Fire is a romantic and sultry affair that showcases her knack for traditional bossa nova tunes as well as few inspired covers. Joining Elias here are a few special guests including Brazil legend Gilberto Gil, who sings on three tracks, as well as singer Amanda Brecker (Elias' daughter with trumpeter Randy Brecker) who appears on "Toda Menina Baiana." Also backing Elias are a bevy of talented individuals, including producer/bassist Marc Johnson, guitarist Oscar Castro-Neves, percussionists Rafael Barata and Paulo Braga, and trumpeter Brecker. Along with Elias' slow-burn take on the Doors' title track, she delivers a stylish version of "My Cherie Amour," adds her own lyrics to trumpeter Kenny Dorham's "Stay Cool," and even delves into Paul Desmond's classic "Take Five." © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 14, 2008 | EMI Music Japan Inc.

Eliane Elias' return to the Blue Note label after a decade working elsewhere is a triumph. This salute to the late pianist Bill Evans, one of her favorite players, explores a number of songs he recorded, including both standards and originals. Evans' bassist from his final trio, Marc Johnson, is not only a long-time collaborator with Elias but also her husband; drummer Joey Baron rounds out the band. While Elias is influenced by Evans' playing style, his arrangements are only a launching pad for her approach to each tune; never does she sound like an obvious Evans clone. Her lush take of "My Foolish Heart" features Johnson on the late Scott LaFaro's bass (the talented Evans sideman who died in a 1961 car wreck just ten days after recording the landmark sets with the pianist at the Village Vanguard). "Evanesque" is a newly discovered work that came from a cassette given to Johnson by Evans, so Elias adjusted the work by incorporating new material with his conception. The freewheeling take of "Solar" is a masterful group improvisation upon the Miles Davis theme. Elias' moving ballad "After All" is a sincere tribute to Evans. She has also built confidence in her singing over time; always gifted with a tender, sensuous voice, Elias glides gently over Johnson's walking introduction to "A Sleepin' Bee" and offers an equally delicate "Walt for Debby." She wrote words to Evans' previously unknown "Here Is Something for You," which was also discovered on the cassette given to Johnson. It is heard in two versions, a solo version with voice and piano where Elias mostly closely mirrors Evans' playing, then the original rehearsal by Evans, which segues into an excerpt of Elias' new version. The Japanese version of this delightful CD features an added track, "Re: Person I Knew." © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Vocal Jazz - Released August 30, 2002 | RCA Bluebird

For a long time, Eliane Elias seemed like a fixture at Blue Note. The Brazilian singer/pianist started recording for that well-known jazz label in the late '80s, and she was still on Blue Note when the 21st century arrived. But in 2002, Elias did the unexpected and moved to RCA; Kissed by Nature is her first RCA release. For the most part, this is a vocal album, although Elias does get in some likable solos -- and this time, she emphasizes relaxed, laid-back Brazilian pop-jazz. Kissed by Nature is essentially Brazilian easy listening, although it isn't bloodless elevator Muzak; even at her most commercial, Elias probably has too much substance and integrity for the average smooth jazz/NAC station. One thing she doesn't have is a great voice. While Elias is an excellent pianist, her voice is undeniably thin -- as a vocalist, she doesn't have a fantastic range by any means. But despite Elias' obvious limitations as a singer, her vocals (some in English, some in Portuguese, and some wordless) are pleasant enough on caressing pop-jazz originals like "A Volta," "Balancê," and the title track. No one will accuse Elias' singing of being in a class with the five-star performances of Gal Costa or Ithamara Koorax, but she does bring warmth and sincerity to her singing -- and those things count for something. Most of the material on Kissed by Nature was written or co-written by Elias; the exception is a medley of songs by Brazilian superstar Djavan, and that medley is arguably the album's standout track (which isn't to say that Elias' own writing isn't respectable). Kissed by Nature won't go down in history as one of Elias' essential releases, but it's a decent effort that's worth hearing if you need a dose of Brazilian mood music. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 18, 1990 | UNIVERSAL MUSIC LLC

This is not an album for those die-hard bossa fans. These popular Jobim tunes all were revisited by Elias with the goal of bridging the gap between Brazilian music and jazz; that goal was achieved. She affirms herself in this complex idiom, resulting in an album that can be enjoyed by any jazz connoisseur. On this record, Elias responds successfully to all the challenges that come with interpreting a legendary artist like Jobim. Enriching Jobim's harmonies through her own musical wisdom, already in the album's first track ("Waters of March"/"Água de Beber"), she escapes from the trap of a conventional soothing rendition. Together with the talents of percussionist Naná Vasconcelos, she instills there a true Brazilian samba spirit, with its restless, somewhat aggressive quality. "Sabiá," usually recalled under Jobim's dense orchestration, receives a delicate ad-lib treatment that metamorphoses into a ballad. "Desafinado," one of the best known Jobim tunes in America, may be the biggest surprise, with itsunstable jazz rhythm joined by creative re-harmonization. "Angela," a haunting, mysterious melody, is properly explored as a calm ballad. "Zíngaro," or "Retrato Em Preto E Branco," is faithful to its Brazilian sentiment in which a ballad feel menaces to take charge but is soon substituted by a typically Brazilian melancholy. "Samba de Uma Nota Só," in a funky interpretation, is not recognizable until they come to the bridge. Then a samba feel takes place, with hot solos and cuíca interventions with the jazzy drumming of deJohnette's enriching the overall pancultural result. The album closes with Elias singing "Don't Ever Go Away" with her heartfelt tone backed by a piano that betrays the classical music tradition inherent to the formation of the Brazilian sensitivity. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Blue Note Records

Two sides of Eliane Elias are on display on this CD. She is heard as an effective soft-toned singer of bossa nova and (particularly on the last few numbers) as a strong post-bop jazz pianist. The bossas (which often feature guitarist Oscar Castro-Neves and flutist Dave Valentin) are enjoyable, if a bit lightweight, and "Chorango" (which has Gil Goldstein on accordion and violinist Mark Feldman) is a modern tango. But it is as a pianist that Elias is most significant, and fortunately, there are enough instrumentals on this release to make it worth picking up by jazz listeners. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 25, 1998 | UNIVERSAL MUSIC LLC

Eliane Elias has considerable chops as an acoustic pianist, although as a singer, she is definitely limited and doesn't have a great range by any means. No one's going to mistake Elias' singing for that of Flora Purim, Astrud Gilberto, Gal Costa or Tânia Maria. But while her voice is paper-thin, Elias sings with enough feeling and sincerity to make Sings Jobim a decent, if conventional, Brazilian jazz offering. Her second tribute to Antonio Carlos Jobim (the first was 1989's all-instrumental Eliane Elias Plays Jobim), this CD finds her staying away from instrumentals and embracing familiar, oft-recorded bossa nova standards like "The Girl from Ipanema," "So Danco Samba," "One Note Samba" and "Desafinado." Elias' singing (most of it in Portuguese) is the focal point, although she gets in a few nice piano solos. Unfortunately, Elias plays it safe and doesn't offer a lot of surprises. Given the many great but lesser-known songs that Jobim wrote, one wishes Elias had been less conservative and more adventurous in her choice of material. Although pleasant enough, this isn't one of her essential releases. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 27, 1992 | UNIVERSAL MUSIC LLC

Eliane Elias continues exploring Brazilian music on this latest release, doing both classics such as "The Girl From Ipanema" and a Milton Nasciemento medley, plus several Ivan Lins tunes. She uses alternating bassists and drummers, with Eddie Gomez, Marc Johnson, Jack DeJohnette, and Peter Erskine dividing time, plus Nana Vasconcelos on percussion, with Lins helping out on vocals. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 19, 1993 | UNIVERSAL MUSIC LLC

Eliane Elias continues to revist and update her Brazilian heritage on this Blue Note CD. The music ranges from South American folk songs and such standards as "Brazil" and "Black Orpheus" to newer originals. Elias mostly sticks to acoustic piano and is primarily heard in a trio format with occasional percussion added. She hints strongly at Keith Jarrett and Bill Evans in spots but by this time had largely formed her own personal style out of her earlier influences. A few vocals (including a collaboration with Ivan Lins) weaken some of the tracks for Elias's singing is on a much lower level than her more individual playing. Still, even with its minor flaws, Paulistana is recommended. © Scott Yanow /TiVo