What is a Qobuzissime? It’s an award presented by Qobuz for a first or second album.

Pop or Reggae, Metal or Classical, Jazz or Blues, no genre is excluded. More often than not the award is presented to a newly discovered artist.

Sometimes it might be a particularly quirky or a crossover album from a discography.

The important aspects are uniqueness, sincerity and quality. We look for these things in the recording, the project and the sound identity.





Albums

£12.49
£10.99

Folk - Released February 24, 2017 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Qobuzissime
Rhiannon Giddens has always been keenly aware of the arc of American history -- the Carolina Chocolate Drops, the 2000s band she once led, was designed as a critique of the darker moments of Americana -- but Freedom Highway, her second solo album, puts her intent into perspective. Where her 2015 solo debut, Tomorrow Is My Turn, was essentially a covers album, gaining its importance through context, Freedom Highway relies on originals, but the past is never far behind. This should be expected from Giddens, who is at her core a folk artist building upon -- and expanding -- tradition, but it's still startling to realize how she establishes a vernacular at the outset of Freedom Highway, then explores all of the possibilities of African-American folk music on the album. "At the Purchaser's Option," the song that inaugurates Freedom Highway, explicitly evokes slavery, and it's spare and haunting, standing in contrast to the title-track closer, a funky number that illustrates how far African-Americans have traveled during the course of the history of the United States. Throughout Freedom Highway, Giddens plays with this idea -- how oppression gave way to freedom -- and it's not just through her lyrics, but how the music expands as the album reaches its conclusion: at the outset, it seems austere, but by its conclusion it's a robust celebration of all the weird, wonderful parts of America. This isn't an accident. Freedom Highway draws upon deep American traditions, and while its form may be a throwback, it speaks to a time when the phrase "Black Lives Matter" can be seen as controversial and, in doing so, it illustrates how these issues are deeply ingrained in American life and cannot be forgotten. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
£13.99
£11.99

Country - Released April 15, 2016 | Third Man Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Qobuzissime
Having exhausted every angle in pop and rock over the past few years, the country scene seems to have finally decided to return to its roots. Margo Price is another name to add to a list alongside the likes of Kacey Musgraves and Sturgill Simpson, among others. A native of Aledo, Illinois, the young damsel has already been lucky enough to be hand picked by a certain Jack White to sign with his label, Third Man Records. Being in favour with the former leader of the White Stripes will bring her some extra spotlight she most certainly deserves... This first solo album however, is by no means the 32-year-old singers first venture in music. She landed in Nashville after finishing high school in 2003, where she met her future husband, bassist Jeremy Ivey. The couple when on to form the (somewhat) obscure Buffalo Clover Group. Three self-produced later albums, and a tsunami of misfortunes which included (the death of her son, time spent in prison, problems with alcohol, anxiety and depression, among others), Margo Price advanced alone with this disc put together in the Mecca of rock music, the legendary Sun studios. To the listener, Midwest Farmer's Daughter – an obvious nod to Coal Miner's Daughter by Loretta Lynn – sees price walk in the footsteps of the great ladies of the eternal country. Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton, Tanya Tucker… Musically, the approach is quite purist and reminiscent of the glorious country of the seventies. Some honkytonk, rockabilly, and blues twang - Margo Price sings her songs with conviction and sincerity. A truly beautiful album, and a worth Qobuzism! ©MZ/Qobuz