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Nirvana - In Utero - 20th Anniversary Remaster

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In Utero - 20th Anniversary Remaster

Nirvana

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Nirvana probably hired Steve Albini to produce In Utero with the hopes of creating their own Surfer Rosa, or at least shoring up their indie cred after becoming a pop phenomenon with a glossy punk record. In Utero, of course, turned out to be their last record, and it's hard not to hear it as Kurt Cobain's suicide note, since Albini's stark, uncompromising sound provides the perfect setting for Cobain's bleak, even nihilistic, lyrics. Even if the album wasn't a literal suicide note, it was certainly a conscious attempt to shed their audience -- an attempt that worked, by the way, since the record had lost its momentum when Cobain died in the spring of 1994. Even though the band tempered some of Albini's extreme tactics in a remix, the record remains a deliberately alienating experience, front-loaded with many of its strongest songs, then descending into a series of brief, dissonant squalls before concluding with "All Apologies," which only gets sadder with each passing year. Throughout it all, Cobain's songwriting is typically haunting, and its best moments rank among his finest work, but the over-amped dynamicism of the recording seems like a way to camouflage his dispiritedness -- as does the fact that he consigned such great songs as "Verse Chorus Verse" and "I Hate Myself and Want to Die" to compilations, when they would have fit, even illuminated the themes of In Utero. Even without those songs, In Utero remains a shattering listen, whether it's viewed as Cobain's farewell letter or self-styled audience alienation. Few other records are as willfully difficult as this.
© Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

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In Utero - 20th Anniversary Remaster

Nirvana

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1
Serve The Servants (Album Version)
00:03:37

Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Geffen Records

2
Scentless Apprentice (Album Version)
00:03:48

Bob Weston, Unknown, Other - Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - Krist Novoselic, Composer, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Dave Grohl, Composer - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Geffen Records

3
Heart-Shaped Box (Album Version)
00:04:41

SCOTT LITT, Additional Mixer, StudioPersonnel - Bob Weston, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Geffen Records

4
Rape Me (Album Version)
00:02:50

Bob Weston, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 UMG Recordings, Inc.

5
Frances Farmer Will Have Her Revenge On Seattle (Album Version)
00:04:10

Bob Weston, Unknown, Other - Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Geffen Records

6
Dumb (Album Version)
00:02:31

Bob Weston, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 UMG Recordings, Inc.

7
Very Ape (Album Version)
00:01:55

Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Geffen Records

8
Milk It (Album Version)
00:03:54

Bob Weston, Unknown, Other - Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Geffen Records

9
Pennyroyal Tea (Album Version)
00:03:38

Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Geffen Records

10
Radio Friendly Unit Shifter (Album Version)
00:04:51

Bob Weston, Unknown, Other - Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Geffen Records

11
Tourette's (Album Version)
00:01:35

Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Geffen Records

12
All Apologies (Album Version)
00:03:53

SCOTT LITT, Mixer, StudioPersonnel - Bob Weston, Unknown, Other - Kurt Cobain, ComposerLyricist - STEVE Albini, Producer, Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Nirvana, MainArtist

℗ 1993 Geffen Records

Album Description

Nirvana probably hired Steve Albini to produce In Utero with the hopes of creating their own Surfer Rosa, or at least shoring up their indie cred after becoming a pop phenomenon with a glossy punk record. In Utero, of course, turned out to be their last record, and it's hard not to hear it as Kurt Cobain's suicide note, since Albini's stark, uncompromising sound provides the perfect setting for Cobain's bleak, even nihilistic, lyrics. Even if the album wasn't a literal suicide note, it was certainly a conscious attempt to shed their audience -- an attempt that worked, by the way, since the record had lost its momentum when Cobain died in the spring of 1994. Even though the band tempered some of Albini's extreme tactics in a remix, the record remains a deliberately alienating experience, front-loaded with many of its strongest songs, then descending into a series of brief, dissonant squalls before concluding with "All Apologies," which only gets sadder with each passing year. Throughout it all, Cobain's songwriting is typically haunting, and its best moments rank among his finest work, but the over-amped dynamicism of the recording seems like a way to camouflage his dispiritedness -- as does the fact that he consigned such great songs as "Verse Chorus Verse" and "I Hate Myself and Want to Die" to compilations, when they would have fit, even illuminated the themes of In Utero. Even without those songs, In Utero remains a shattering listen, whether it's viewed as Cobain's farewell letter or self-styled audience alienation. Few other records are as willfully difficult as this.
© Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

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