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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1973 | Motown

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
A blaxploitation masterpiece on par with Curtis Mayfield's Superfly and Isaac Hayes' Shaft, Roy Ayers' soundtrack for the 1973 Pam Grier vehicle Coffy remains one of the most intriguing and evocative film scores of its era or any other. Ayers' signature vibes create atmospheres and textures quite distinct from your average blaxploitation effort, embracing both heavy, tripped-out funk ("Brawling Broads") and vividly nuanced soul-jazz ("Aragon"). The vocal numbers are no less impressive, in particular the rapturous opening cut, "Coffy Is the Color." Richly cinematic grooves, as inventive and cohesive as any of Ayers' vintage Ubiquity LPs. Highly recommended. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released August 10, 2004 | Epic - Sony Music Soundtrax

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 28, 1993 | Arista

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Musical Theatre - Released August 23, 1999 | RCA Records Label

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Film Soundtracks - Released February 28, 2006 | Volcano - Legacy

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Pop/Rock - Released October 13, 1998 | Clean Slate - Work - Sony Music Soundtrax

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 19, 1995 | RCA Records Label

In contrast to the experiences of many Broadway songwriters, the team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II had a large say in how their shows came to the big screen. South Pacific did not arrive in movie theaters until nine years after its Broadway opening, and when it did on March 19, 1958, its two-hour, 70-minute running time allowed for the full Rodgers & Hammerstein score, plus one song, "My Girl Back Home," that had been cut from the stage version for time. In addition to preserving their songs, the songwriters saw to it that the songs were sung by people they approved of, most of whom were not the same people seen on the screen. Mitzi Gaynor sang her own songs in the lead female role of nurse Nellie Forbush, and Ray Walston, who had played the supporting part of rowdy marine Luther Billis in the first national tour and in London, also got to sing. But Rossano Brazzi, as male lead Emile de Becque, was dubbed by opera singer Giorgio Tozzi (who was given screen credit), John Kerr as second male lead Lt. Cable was replaced by Bill Lee, and Juanita Hall, who had originated the role of Bloody Mary on Broadway, was voiced by Muriel Smith, who had played the part in London. (Several minor characters were also dubbed.) While it would have been nice if Lee and Smith were credited in the film and on the soundtrack album, the result is a well-sung version of the score. Gaynor is appropriately frisky in what is really a soubrette's part in songs like "I'm Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair" and "I'm in Love With a Wonderful Guy," Tozzi is sonorous and romantic in "Some Enchanted Evening," Lee is passionate in "Younger Than Springtime," Smith is haunting in "Bali Ha'i" and playful in "Happy Talk," and Walston, leading the Ken Darby Male Chorus, makes the most of "Bloody Mary" and "There Is Nothin' Like a Dame." Only Smith and Walston improve upon their counterparts on the original Broadway cast album, however, with stage leads Mary Martin and Ezio Pinza particularly outdistancing their screen and soundtrack rivals. And now that CD reissues of that earlier recording contain Martin's version of "My Girl Back Home," one can't even argue that the soundtrack album is more complete. The original Broadway cast album is preferred. It also sold better than the soundtrack album, but the soundtrack's commercial performance was not at all shabby. The film was one of 1958's ten biggest moneymakers, but the soundtrack did even better. Its run of more than seven months at number one tied it for fourth place among the longest chart toppers in history behind the original Broadway cast album, the soundtrack to West Side Story, and Michael Jackson's Thriller. It was not only the most successful album of 1958, but the most successful album of the second half of the 1950s. Given that success, the album has been relatively neglected in the CD era. There was a straight-transfer reissue in 1988, but it took RCA until October 24, 2000, to release a refurbished CD version, and that one turned out to be a disappointment. At a time when rivals like Sony and Universal were upgrading their cast and soundtrack reissues in terms of sound, bonus tracks, annotations, and photographs, RCA's new South Pacific seemed skimpy. There were no bonus tracks, little in the way of annotation (the songs were credited by character name except for Ken Darby!), a modest if well-written essay by Joseph F. Laredo, and no new photographs. In fact, the cover was a reproduction of the cover of the original monophonic LP (proclaiming "A 'New Orthophonic' High Fidelity Release"), down to its catalog number, LOC-1032, which was confusing, since the reissue had a new catalog number and was in stereo. Such a jewel of RCA's catalog deserved better treatment. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released January 22, 1985 | Columbia

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Classical - Released January 23, 2001 | Sony Classical

Swedish filmmaker Lasse Hallström's directorial style is marked by a taste for simplicity. He is an old-school storyteller, preferring to step out of the way and let the story speak for itself. The approach has its advantages, but the earnest limpidity of his vision can have a stultifying effect on his films. Rachel Portman's innocuously pretty score for Hallström's innocuously pretty 1999 screen adaptation of The Cider House Rules played by the director's rules, melding pleasantly and forgettably into the glossy period landscape. The score brought her an Oscar nomination, but lacked both the eclectic complexity (Beloved) and the vibrant playfulness (Emma) of her best work. A year later, Hallström's adaptation of the Joanne Harris novel Chocolat was in many ways as charming and as vapid as Cider House. But Portman's score was a different story altogether. Throughout Chocolat, Portman's rich and airy melodies float sweetly across the screen, mischievously hinting at hidden meanings and darker themes. The music does not so much capture as create the whimsical and mysterious atmosphere of the film, blending breezy French orchestral allusions with otherworldly Andean flutes and rambling gypsy guitars in an effective sonic representation of the cultural clash between Juliette Binoche's South American mystic, Johnny Depp's Irish river rat, and the conservative French town that brings them together. Depp's fans will undoubtedly be delighted by his impressive fretwork on the Django Reinhardt and Duke Ellington gypsy guitar pieces that begin and end the soundtrack album. But Portman's is the film's most impressive performance. She proves to be the perfect composer to help Hallström project the tale's subversive feminine energies. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released June 2, 1992 | Epic Soundtrax

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Soundtracks - Released February 2, 2000 | Columbia - Sony Music Soundtrax

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Pop - Released January 1, 2000 | Polydor Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 23, 1999 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 20, 1990 | Volcano

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Film Soundtracks - Released September 24, 1996 | Play-Tone - Epic Soundtrax

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Film Soundtracks - Released April 1, 2004 | SBME Strategic Marketing Group

The Ultimate Pink Panther gathers the themes and other pieces of Henry Mancini's scores from the six Pink Panther movies. Beginning with the instantly recognizable "The Pink Panther Theme" and verging from almost unbearable romantic ("Royal Blue") and lusciously smooth ("Champagne and Quail") to silly ("It Had Better Be Tonight," "Shades of Sennett"), the tracks from 1964's film The Pink Panther are the most enjoyable. The theme to A Shot in the Dark (also from 1964), a wonderful and inventive slice of spy music, is also quite fun. The tracks from the Pink Panther films of the '70s don't hold up quite as well. Perhaps it is the overly smooth sound of the orchestra which sounds closer to an elevator than a cocktail lounge. Perhaps it is the lack of memorable melodies. Perhaps it is the presence of an uncomfortable oily vocal by Tom Jones on "Come to Me." Perhaps it is all of the above plus the '70s added together. Whatever it is, the dropoff in listenability is precipitous. The only track that really measures up to the '60s work is "Main Title from The Pink Panther Strikes Again," which dresses up the original with some witty musical quotes and plays it for laughs. The Bobby McFerrin version of "The Pink Panther Theme" from 1993's Son of the Pink Panther is also interesting, once. If you are looking for a disc that gathers up the best of the Pink Panther scores, this is the place. If you want the absolute best of Mancini's Pink Panther work, track down the score for the first film. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 27, 2004 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop - Released May 2, 2002 | Columbia - Sony Music Soundtrax - Marvel - Columbia Pictures

Criticized by some as being merely functional, Danny Elfman's intricate, propulsive music for Spider-Man delivers a richly detailed soundscape that proves even more intricate with repeat listenings. Elfman's brief motifs for Peter Parker and the Green Goblin propel the score, dancing around each other as the album progresses. Punctuated throughout with pulsing, rhythmic undertones, the action sequences bristle with energy, from the driving percussion and electric guitars of "Costume Montage" to the sheer orchestral fireworks of "Final Confrontation." While Elfman's music for the romantic aspects of the story gets short shrift on this CD, a decent balance is maintained, creating an album that's heavier on the action material without being overburdened. Elfman created a score that works perfectly in the film and also gets a strong presentation on disc. Avoid the dreadful "songs from and inspired by" soundtrack CD; Elfman's album of spider-music really scores. © TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released January 9, 1996 | Columbia

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Film Soundtracks - Released June 14, 1993 | Epic Soundtrax