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Classical - To be released January 15, 2021 | Sony Classical

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Classical - To be released December 11, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - To be released November 20, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - To be released November 13, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - To be released November 13, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 28, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 23, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 23, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 23, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 23, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Here, Reinhard Goebel continues his fascinating exploration of works by Beethoven's contemporaries. The prolific composer Jan Ladislav Dussek (not to be confused with František Xaver Dušek, Mozart’s Czech friend) studied with Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach in Hamburg before moving to Paris. He left soon after due to the French Revolution to settle in London. It was there that he rubbed shoulders with Haydn, whose works were performed at the same time as his own.The long-forgotten Viennese Anton Eberl was unanimously considered as one of the greatest composers of his time, on par with Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. One of his symphonies was chosen for the premiere of the “Eroica” Symphony in 1805 and his music comforted an audience who were somewhat confused by Beethoven’s novel music.At the risk of repeating ourselves, we should once again acknowledge the gulf between these two Concertos for two pianos (composed according to the norms of that time) and Beethoven in order to fully understand the aesthetic revolution that the latter caused. Such a comparison is of course incredibly unfair and is only intended informatively, even if it sheds new light on the era. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Pop - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released October 9, 2020 | Sony Classical

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Lang Lang would have called it Piano Book. But Cartier’s new muse decided to add a touch of mystery. Once again surfing on the wave of neo-classical-ambient piano initiated by the likes of Nils Frahm and Alexis Ffrench, one of the most famous personalities in the classical world has decided to bring her audience a collection of inescapable pieces. The works have a subtle feel and a gently melancholic character, captured in an acoustic recording (in the Grande Salle Pierre Boulez at the Philharmonie de Paris) where the recording’s fluffy character has deliberately been enhanced. Labyrinth is a playlist of some the classical repertoire’s greatest hits. We find the likes of Satie’s Gymnopédie No. 1, J.S. Bach's Badinerie, Rachmaninov’s Prelude No. 4 Vocalise, Couperin’s Les barricades mystérieuses and Liszt’s Consolation No. 3.Throughout the 18 pieces, which include at least two less well-known pieces (Villa-Lobos’ Valsa da dor and Pärt’s Pari intervallo), Khatia Buniatishvili doesn’t force contrasts. Instead, she plunges the listener into another dimension. Style is no longer the Georgian pianist’s concern. Emotion becomes abstract. There is only one spirit; that of her travelling soul.Nothing - and no one - will be able to compete with the profoundly philosophical character of this new concept album. “The labyrinth”, says the artist “is our fate and creation; our impasse and deliverance; the polyphony of life, senses, reawakened dreams and the neglected present; unexpected and expected turnings of the said or unsaid... The labyrinth of our mind.” © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz

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