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Vocal Jazz - Released April 1, 1957 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Vocalist Blossom Dearie's Summetime is a low-key collection of chamber-jazz arranged for a small trio. Working with guitarist Mundell Lowe, bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Ed Thigpen, Dearie sings the material with a gentle conviction; she may never sound passionate, but she never sounds like she doesn't care. The result is a pleasant record, that might never be a compelling listen, but it's never a bad one. ~ Thom Owens
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | Verve

Distinctions Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1959 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | Decca (UMO)

From the audience's reaction, Blossom Dearie held London in the palm of her hand during her stand at Ronnie Scott's. They clapped and shouted and, sometimes, to the surprised joy of Dearie herself, sang along. The ten-track set, recorded with Dearie on piano and vocals with drummer Johnny Butts and bassist Jeff Clyne, alternates between comic numbers and ballads, although it's clear which Dearie prefers. Although she has the capability of summoning melancholy and loss as readily as glee, she prefaces the somber "When the World Was Young" by deadpanning to a few audience guffaws, "I feel that I must warn you right now that...there's a very dramatic ending." She's simply bewitching in either mode, mastering the intimacy and confidence that allowed cabaret or jazz singers to hold an audience spellbound, but best when using her girlish voice and comic's timing to skewer romance ("Everything I've Got Belongs to You") or hipness ("I'm Hip"). Compared to her studio sides, her voice becomes yet warmer and more personable in person, with just a rub of vibrato at the end of her lines. Blossom Time at Ronnie Scott's is a splendid complement to her two or three best Verve LPs. ~ John Bush
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Verve

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Comedy/Other - Released January 1, 1998 | Blue Note Records

Pianist/vocalist Blossom Dearie's lone Capitol session is probably her best-known album. Backed by an unidentified orchestra, Dearie sings concise versions of a dozen songs, all of which clock in under three minutes. Her small and cutesy voice will not appeal to all listeners, but she has long had a cult following. Highlights include "I'm in Love Again," "Quiet Nights," "May I Come In?," and "I'm Old Fashioned." ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1959 | Verve

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Jazz - Released May 11, 2016 | CTS Digital

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Jazz - Released May 20, 2003 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1958 | Verve

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Of the six recordings Blossom Dearie did for the Verve label in the '50s, Give Him the Ooh-La-La is the third one to be released on CD. Three titles still remain in the vaults including a Betty Comden and Johnny Green tribute as well as a Broadway Hits collection. It's a shame because Dearie's girlishly dynamic voice, subtle piano playing, and rarified choice of contemporary material made her recordings unique among '50s jazz vocal outings. Give Him the Ooh-La-La is no exception, with stellar backing by regular bassist Ray Brown, drummer Jo Jones and guitarist Herb Ellis, and Dearie's taut arrangements of a set of glowing ballads and brisk swingers. Included are a few well-worn standards like "Just One of Those Things" and "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea." More intriguing, however, are Dearie's inclusion of obscure titles like Cy Coleman's "The Riviera," a tongue and cheek portrait of Europe's playground, as well as his "I Walk a Little Faster." Additionally, there's the gently executed and innocuous self-help number "Try Your Wings," a bouncy "The Middle of Love," and a nod to her club stint in Paris with the French tune "Plus Je T'Embrasse." As usual, both Dearie's piano and voice are instilled with impeccable playfulness on mischievous numbers like the title track and in the tender pathos of ballads such as "Like Someone in Love." Like Dearie's two other available titles Blossom Dearie and Once Upon a Summertime, Give Him the Ooh-La-La features a great collection of tunes from the high point of her recording career. The dilemma is not which recording to get, but where to start. ~ Stephen Cook
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Jazz - Released January 12, 2018 | Australian Broadcasting Corp (ABC)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve

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Jazz - Released April 1, 1957 | Verve Reissues

Other than a pair of sessions for the French Barclay label during 1955-1956, this set (which has been reissued on CD) has pianist-vocalist Blossom Dearie's first recordings as a leader. Teamed up with bassist Ray Brown and drummer Jo Jones, Dearie is heard in her early prime. Although her voice has always been an acquired taste, its sincerity and sense of swing wins one over after a few songs and Dearie's piano playing is first class. In addition to the 14 original selections (mostly swing-era standards plus a couple of French songs), there are three previously unreleased numbers including "Blossom's Blues," which dates from 1959. This CD is the perfect introduction for listeners to the unique sound of Blossom Dearie. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Verve

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Pop - Released January 1, 1997 | Verve Reissues

An odd Japanese collection, Whisper for You reissues one of the New York cabaret singer's rarer sessions, 1970's That's Just the Way I Want to Be, and adds nine songs from her 1958 Verve LP Give Him the Ooh-La-La. Though the schmaltzy title and cover (featuring a sleepy kitten) may deter vocal fans, anyone wanting to hear one of her only post-'60s records available on CD would do well to search this one out. Blossom Dearie adapted pretty well to the changing times, stretching out on atmospheric songs that sound familiar to any fans of singer/songwriter or folk-rock forms. The title-track opener of That's Just the Way I Want to Be is a good start, her own composition (one of nine here, most of them collaborations) and one that nicely illustrates her outsider status -- a plus, as far as rock audiences were concerned. Brian Gascoigne's floating arrangement makes good use of vibes and flute, and his charts wisely stay out of the way, except on one dated arrangement for Dearie's "Long Daddy Green" (it has the same muddy sound as the spots for Schoolhouse Rock, which Dearie contributed to). Elsewhere, Dearie finds common ground with Joni Mitchell ("Both Sides Now"), and also sings tributes to (presumably) her favorites among British rock singers, "Sweet Georgie Fame" and "Dusty Springfield" (both probably owed small debts to her as well). The nine tracks tacked onto the end, from her Verve date Give Him the Ooh-La-La, far outshine any from the later session, including "Just One of Those Things" and "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea." ~ John Bush
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Jazz - Released March 29, 2016 | CTS Digital

Jazz - Released July 5, 2017 | Reloaded Music

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1960 | Verve Reissues

To hear Blossom Dearie's early records for Verve is to think that she would excel singing any song in any circumstance; to hear Soubrette: Sings Broadway Hit Songs is to realize that even she has limitations. Dearie, cast as the soubrette ("the saucy-serving-maid" or "the heroine's confidante," from the liner notes), is certainly a perfect fit for the role, which draws upon her skill at delivering witty material with a wink and a smile. This record fails nevertheless for two reasons -- it's her first record with full orchestral arrangements, and she doesn't impress when she's singing a comic song straight (comparatively speaking), which she does here. The arrangements of Russ Garcia are inventive but burdensome, and overly close for a Blossom Dearie date; instead of following every one of her humorous lines with its auditory equivalent (usually brass or vibraphone), far better to let the soubrette speak for herself. And Dearie herself missteps when singing a few of these ("Guys and Dolls" and "Life Upon the Wicked Stage") with no trace of her jazz smarts and unfailing interpretive sense. A few songs allow her to float the punch lines without undue intrusion, such as "To Keep My Love Alive" (in which a female serial killer explains her actions) and the eccentric, playful state-naming "Rhode Island Is Famous for You." ~ John Bush