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Alternative & Indie - To be released November 13, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - To be released November 13, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - To be released October 9, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Blues - Released September 25, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Electronic - Released September 25, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Blues - Released September 25, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Folk/Americana - Released September 18, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Yusuf, the artist who was known in the '60s and '70s as Cat Stevens, has given fans a new and different version of one of their favorite albums with 2020's Tea for the Tillerman 2. The original 1970 edition was Stevens' international breakthrough and produced one of his biggest hits, "Wild World." For Tea for the Tillerman 2, Yusuf and original producer Paul Samwell-Smith have reunited and re-recorded the 11 songs from the 1970 edition, in the same sequence as the original but with different arrangements. In this re-imagining, "Wild World" is given a jazzy tone, "Miles from Nowhere" adds blues-rock guitars, and "Longer Boats" incorporates rap-influenced vocals. The songs hold up well in their pastoral optimism and cautious tone about the state of the world, and Yusuf's performances are as committed as they were in his younger days. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Folk/Americana - Released September 18, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 18, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

The Fontana Years is four discs -- 1990's The House of Love (the "butterfly" album) and A Spy in the House of Love, 1992's Babe Rainbow, and 1994's Audience With the Mind -- whittled down to two, with some spare B-sides sprinkled around. Quite possibly slapped together as a reaction to the reignited Rev-Ola label -- the source of 2003/2004-released compilations from several of the House of Love's old Creation label mates, such as the Jasmine Minks, the Weather Prophets, and Biff Bang Pow! -- its only saving grace is the single-disc price. Though the years covered here weren't the House of Love's best, they are deserving of better treatment, especially since some key album cuts ("Hannah," "Feel") are left out of the mix, and there isn't enough room for all of the B-sides. One thing that every prospective purchaser in the U.S. should consider: the four discs that this set draws from can be swooped up in one shot at your average used shop for roughly the same cost; you can find any one of them for a couple bucks apiece. Diehards remain in need of a thorough B-sides compilation from these years -- some are probably still stinging from having to hunt down all those multi-format singles for the elusive non-album tracks. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 11, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released September 11, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 11, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

As all of her demos show, PJ Harvey has a definite vision for each of her albums by the time she commits her songs to tape. With 1995's To Bring You My Love, she expanded her sound dramatically, fleshing out the bones of her music with lush instrumentation such as keyboards and strings. On To Bring You My Love: The Demos, how she gets the ideas across for this lavish-sounding album with relatively limited resources makes for fascinating listening. Obviously, these versions are much rawer than the final product Harvey crafted in the studio with Flood and John Parish. The demo of "Down by the Water," the album's quintessential track, is a stylized miniature of the finished version, thanks to the stiff, tinny beats and canned organ sounds of the secondhand Yamaha keyboard Harvey used to write the album. Nevertheless, this song and the rest of To Bring You My Love: The Demos sizzles with the potential she fulfilled in the studio with the rest of her creative team. They also reveal different connections to the rest of her body of work: This incarnation of "C'mon Billy" sounds like it could have appeared on Dry, and once again the Yamaha's synth strings and beats lend a very different color to the song compared to the live string section and percussion of the studio version. Several other acoustic-based songs are highlights, such as the fiery takes on "Send His Love to Me" and "The Dancer," which leans into the song's flamenco influences and feels notably looser than the rendition on To Bring You My Love. Elsewhere, the brash, lo-fi version of "Meet Ze Monsta" recalls 4-Track Demos, while the serrated guitar din of the "Long Snake Moan" demo suggests that it could have fit in on Rid of Me. As always, Harvey's voice sounds fantastic, particularly on "Teclo," where her lower register and startling vibrato reflect the mix of genuine, deeply felt emotion and theatrical presentation that extends to all of To Bring You My Love. Since so much of the album's power resides in its stunning production, this set might be slightly less revelatory than some of Harvey's other demo albums. Nevertheless, die-hard fans will savor the glimpse into her creative process that To Bring You My Love: The Demos provides. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 11, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Released September 4, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Pop - Released August 14, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 24, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Over the course of PJ Harvey's career, documenting her art has seemed almost as important to her as creating it. She most famously let her audience behind the curtain with 4-Track Demos, the album of sketches and outtakes that followed on the heels of her breakthrough Rid of Me, and continued the tradition with projects like 2019's A Dog Called Money, a film chronicling the research behind and the recording of The Hope Six Demolition Project. In 2020, Harvey reissued her body of work with accompanying albums of their demos, starting with Dry. Though these demos were originally released with a limited edition of the album back in 1992, they've only grown more fascinating with time. Stripped of the grungy heft of their studio versions, the beautiful, nimble bones of these songs are allowed to stand on their own. The more intimate rendition of "Dress," with its dreamy, half-whispered opening verse and touches of scraping violins and searing guitars, presents an even clearer picture of the song's dashed hopes. A brisk reading of "Sheela Na Gig" that puts the focus on Harvey's playful vocals is another highlight, as is "Happy and Bleeding," where the spellbinding dynamics she creates with just her vocals and guitar might actually surpass the version that appears on Dry. Her combinations of blues, folk, and indie are at their rawest on "Hair" and "Fountain," both of which imply the gale-force intensity of their finished renditions. While some of these songs needed the studio treatment to fulfill their potential, it's clear that Harvey knew exactly how she wanted them to sound when she committed these sketches to tape. While Dry: The Demos doesn't hold any huge revelations, its small differences and riveting performances are treasures for die-hard fans who have the same passion for archiving that Harvey does. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 3, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Reggae - Released June 12, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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1977 was the year that Bob Marley became a superstar, but it was also the year that marked the beginning of the end. In January, Bob was exiled to London after being shot in Jamaica and recorded his new album, Exodus, in the Island studios. Packed with hits (One Love, Jamming, Three Little Birds, to name but a few), the album received universal acclaim after its release – its title track became No. 1 in England and Germany – and finally got him noticed by black American music stations. On 10th May 1977, the Wailers kicked off their international tour in Paris. During their stay in the French capital, Bob injured his foot and as the wound worsened, it was revealed that he had skin cancer. The tour was cut short, ending abruptly in London with four shows at the Rainbow Theatre.The performance on June 4th, which was also captured on video, has now been re-released on this album. Bob Marley is joined on stage by his legendary rhythm section composed of Carlton and Aston Barrett (drums and bass), Tyrone Downie on keyboards, Alvin “Seeco” Patterson on percussion, Junior Marvin – who turned down an offer from Stevie Wonder to join the Jamaican – on guitar, and the I Threes on backing vocals. The tracklist is an extravaganza of his greatest hits (Trenchtown Rock, I Shot the Sheriff, No Woman No Cry and Lively Up Yourself, featuring a deeply soulful blues solo by Marvin). Also included are three excerpts from their newest album, The Heathen, Jamming and finally, Exodus for a frenetic finale expertly led by Tyrone Downie. A beautiful piece of history. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Reggae - Released June 12, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

1977 was the year that Bob Marley became a superstar, but it was also the year that marked the beginning of the end. In January, Bob was exiled to London after being shot in Jamaica and recorded his new album, Exodus, in the Island studios. Packed with hits (One Love, Jamming, Three Little Birds, to name but a few), the album received universal acclaim after its release – its title track became No. 1 in England and Germany – and finally got him noticed by black American music stations. On 10th May 1977, the Wailers kicked off their international tour in Paris. During their stay in the French capital, Bob injured his foot and as the wound worsened, it was revealed that he had skin cancer. The tour was cut short, ending abruptly in London with four shows at the Rainbow Theatre. The performance on June 4th, which was also captured on video, has now been re-released on this album. Bob Marley is joined on stage by his legendary rhythm section composed of Carlton and Aston Barrett (drums and bass), Tyrone Downie on keyboards, Alvin “Seeco” Patterson on percussion, Junior Marvin – who turned down an offer from Stevie Wonder to join the Jamaican – on guitar, and the I Threes on backing vocals. The tracklist is an extravaganza of his greatest hits (Trenchtown Rock, I Shot the Sheriff, No Woman No Cry and Lively Up Yourself, featuring a deeply soulful blues solo by Marvin). Also included are three excerpts from their newest album, The Heathen, Jamming and finally, Exodus for a frenetic finale expertly led by Tyrone Downie. A beautiful piece of history. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Rock - Released May 29, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

After the breakup of the Stooges and his admittance to a psychiatric hospital, Iggy Pop was blessed with a guardian angel like no other – David Bowie. The Thin White Duke took Iggy with him to Berlin as he embarked on what would become his Berlin trilogy (Low, Heroes and Lodger). It was during this European escapade which included a sojourn in the Château d’Hérouville 50 miles from Paris, that the Iguana produced two of his greatest solo albums, The Idiot and Lust for Life. As the title indicates, this 7CD box set, The Bowie Years, documents the golden age of Iggy’s solo career. In addition, to the two remastered masterpieces above, it includes a CD of alternative mixes, edited singles and an interview with the singer on recording The Idiot. This musical treasure trove also contains Iggy’s effort to reach the same standard as the Stooges in a wild live performance recorded on March 7th, 1977 at the Rainbow Theatre in London, featuring Bowie on keyboards. In addition, the box set includes the famous T.V. Eye Live, a compilation of excerpts from concerts held in Cleveland, Chicago and Kansas City in March 1977. With Bowie on keyboards, Iggy Pop performs his latest hits at the time, Funtime, Sixteen, Lust for Life and Nightclubbing. Finally, the box set concludes with more live material from a concert at the Agora in Cleveland, as well as recordings from the Mantra Studio in Chicago. The Idiot and Lust For Life are, of course, the two centrepieces of this 7CD rock extravaganza. In the cold decadence and schizophrenic madness of a city still separated in two by the Berlin wall, the two men were inspired by the latest sounds from Kraftwerk, Neu!, Can and all of the bands from the Krautrock scene. Together, Ziggy and Iggy wrote and directed this disturbing masterpiece named The Idiot, (a reference to Dostoyevsky’s eponymous novel), which is full of cheap synths (like on the trance-inducing Nightclubbing), ominous bass lines and minimalist, abrasive and tortured guitars. Iggy even sounds like a drugged-up Sinatra on the track Tiny Girls. Possessing an urban edge, this angular and sinister masterpiece was a superb comeback for Iggy and sounded closer to Bowie’s music than anything the Stooges had produced. Following its release in March 1977, the album greatly influenced many new-wave bands for years to come. Just five months after The Idiot was released, Iggy Pop returned with his second masterpiece Lust For Life, released in August 1977. This second instalment of their collaboration is another treat for the ears but is, in a sense, slightly more uncontroversial and eclectic than the first with more classic rock and less experimentation. Concocted with Bowie once again in the Hansa studios in Berlin, this second solo album by Iggy combines mad rock ‘n’ roll (the song Lust for Life which was given a new lease of life in 1996 when British filmmaker Danny Boyle used it as the opening track on his film Trainspotting), with pop (Tonight) and crooning ballads (Turn Blue). The king Iguana of punk becomes a full-on entertainer in this album and proves that he, too, can croon. Bowie plays the keyboards while brothers Tony and Hunt Sales handle the rhythm and Ricky Gardiner and Carlos Alomar add guitar solos here, there and everywhere. The music he released after The Idiot and Lust For Life didn’t have the same oomph, but it didn’t matter – after the three Stooges albums and these two solo ones, Iggy Pop had already made his way into the rock music history books. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz