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CD$38.49

Jazz - Released April 17, 2020 | Verve Reissues

CD$25.49

Vocal Jazz - Released March 13, 2020 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released November 29, 2019 | Verve Reissues

1989 date with too much pop in Afro-Latin mix. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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Gospel - Released October 18, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Gospel - Released October 18, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Gospel - Released October 18, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Gospel - Released September 13, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released August 2, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released August 2, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released June 28, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Verve Records have released a live album, recorded on November 26th 1961 at New York’s famous jazz club, Village Gate. On stage are Stan Getz and his new quartet comprising of pianist Steve Kuhn, double bass player John Neves and drummer Roy Haynes. Although the recordings were set aside after that night and had ended up in the record company’s archives, 58 years later, they have now re-emerged with flawless sound. Getz at the Gate understandably arouses much interest as the saxophonist’s artistic direction throughout the entirety of the 2 hours 20-minute concert is one that he did not pursue thereafter.Getz formed this new group having just returned from Europe and its more modern and aggressive sound was most likely influenced by John Coltrane’s quartet in which Kuhn played. But in 1962, his album with guitarist Charlie Byrd was a hit, sparking the trend for bossa nova-infused jazz and propelling Getz not only down other stylistic paths but also to the top of the charts with numerous albums with Luiz Bonfá, João Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Astrud Gilberto. Getz at the Gate is quite clearly light years away from this exoticism but is still far from the Getz bop, cool or West Coast jazz from his early days. Here, in a highly effective post-bop style, he revisits tracks played during the 1950s such as When The Sun Comes Out, Like Someone in Love and even Spring Can Really Hang You Up The Most and Roy Haynes’ drumming ties everything together brilliantly, as always. Of course, the four men also show their admiration for Coltrane by taking on his legendary Impressions. In short - a previously unreleased and utterly thrilling concert. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released May 3, 2019 | Verve Reissues

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Verve Records have released a live album, recorded on November 26th 1961 at New York’s famous jazz club, Village Gate. On stage are Stan Getz and his new quartet comprising of pianist Steve Kuhn, double bass player John Neves and drummer Roy Haynes. Although the recordings were set aside after that night and had ended up in the record company’s archives, 58 years later, they have now re-emerged with flawless sound. Getz at the Gate understandably arouses much interest as the saxophonist’s artistic direction throughout the entirety of the 2 hours 20-minute concert is one that he did not pursue thereafter.Getz formed this new group having just returned from Europe and its more modern and aggressive sound was most likely influenced by John Coltrane’s quartet in which Kuhn played. But in 1962, his album with guitarist Charlie Byrd was a hit, sparking the trend for bossa nova-infused jazz and propelling Getz not only down other stylistic paths but also to the top of the charts with numerous albums with Luiz Bonfá, João Gilberto, Antonio Carlos Jobim and Astrud Gilberto. Getz at the Gate is quite clearly light years away from this exoticism but is still far from the Getz bop, cool or West Coast jazz from his early days. Here, in a highly effective post-bop style, he revisits tracks played during the 1950s such as When The Sun Comes Out, Like Someone in Love and even Spring Can Really Hang You Up The Most and Roy Haynes’ drumming ties everything together brilliantly, as always. Of course, the four men also show their admiration for Coltrane by taking on his legendary Impressions. In short - a previously unreleased and utterly thrilling concert. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Gospel - Released September 13, 2018 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released August 31, 2018 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released June 29, 2018 | Verve Reissues

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No need to go back to the various faces displayed by Leonard Bernstein, conductor, composer, educator, presenter, writer, etc. Like Gershwin, Bernstein has tackled all musical genres and has also influenced them himself! To the point that his music has become some sort of American soundtrack, from Broadway to pop to jazz. Talking about jazz. In the middle of the celebration of Bernstein’s centenary, the label Decca offers to compile the love of the greatest musicians and singers of yesterday and today for the art of the author of West Side Story. The interest of this Jazz Loves Bernstein mostly lies in the gathering of classics and less-known pieces. From Billie Holliday in Big Stuff (from Fancy Free) to Diana Krall and Mark Whitfield for Some Other Time (from the musical On the Town), the spectrum is quite large. You will find here gems such as Tonight from West Side Story performed with much warmth by Billy Eckstine, or, from the same work, Maria and I Feel Pretty magnified by Sarah Vaughan. Other big names like Oliver Nelson, Oscar Peterson in trio, Bobby Scott, Eric Reed, Mel Tormé, Carmen McRae, Bill Charlap, Maynard Ferguson and Bob James cover in their own way songs and themes that have entered the American Heritage to appropriate them. Just like Lucky To Be Me, performed by Swedish singer Monica Zetterlund helped by pianist Bill Evans. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released June 15, 2018 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released May 4, 2018 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released April 13, 2018 | Verve Reissues

With a music based on African-American folklore rooted in gospel and traditional blues, Louis Armstrong created a popular musical current of international, even universal appeal! His talent as a trumpeter, his charisma, his qualities as an entertainer and his generous personality forged his reputation. The reputation of a giant. Of a legend, far beyond the arts. Rooted in the tradition of New Orleans, Armstrong propelled the soloist on the paths of improvisation, which would eventually become the backbone of jazz. With Charlie Parker and Duke Ellington, he formed the Holy Trinity of modern jazz…Released in the spring of 2018, Pops Is Tops: The Verve Studio Albums features four CDs: I’ve Got The World On A String, Louis Under The Stars (both with Russell Garcia’s orchestra), A Day With Satchmo and Louis Armstrong Meets Oscar Peterson, along with bonus tracks on each album. A set of tracks recorded in just a few days in August and October 1957. Back then, Armstrong was already considered as one of the most important musicians of the century. Even his discography was already gargantuan. These records were captured right after his duo albums with Ella Fitzgerald. Norman Granz had just taken over the Verve label and oversaw these sessions. The legendary producer was wise enough to provide his star with virtuoso musicians – great orchestras and small formations – and a five-star repertoire, giving his voice and his solos an unrivalled background. With Armstrong’s unmistakable raspy voice, any melody could reach sublime heights, and Pops Is Tops: The Verve Studio Albums is a constant reminder of that! © MD/Qobuz
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Vocal Jazz - Released April 6, 2018 | Verve Reissues

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Vocal Jazz - Released December 1, 2017 | Verve Reissues

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True fans of Ella Fitzgerald must be having a hard time trying to find storage space for the live albums of their idol, since there are so many of them. And yet, this one, completely new, is rather special as it proposes a concert offered in Hollywood’s Zardi’s Jazzland on 2nd February, 1956 - a few days before she recorded her first disc for Verve. Originally recorded by Norman Granz to celebrate this signature on his label, these two sets will in the end remain in the archives to the detriment of Ella Fitzgerald Sings The Cole Porter Song Book, a studio disc that would launch her series of albums devoted to the songbooks of the great American authors… In this year 1956, Ella Fitzgerald is almost 40 already and is far from being unknown. But her transition from Decca to Verve would finally propel her into a completely new level of fame. We hear her here full of exuberance, joy and energy. Her voice is astoundingly fluid, and her sense of rhythm is difficult to surpass. And even when she forgets part of the text, the great entertainer that she is takes over and the adoration from the audience doesn’t waiver one bit. As for her repertoire, she makes the masterpieces her own, penned by Duke Ellington (In A Mellow Tone), Cole Porter (My Heart Belongs To Daddy), Jerome Kern (A Fine Romance) and the Gershwin brothers (S'Wonderful, I've Got a Crush On You). As for the disciples to this voice, we find the pianist Don Abney, bass player Vernon Alley and drummer Frank Capp - all impeccable bodyguards, even if later, musicians of a completely different level will assist the singer. It’s very touching to hear, in the first seconds of the disc, Norman Granz tell the Californian audience: “For me she’s the greatest there is: Miss Ella Fitzgerald!” © MZ/Qobuz
CD$12.99

Jazz - Released December 1, 2017 | Verve Reissues