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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1984 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Most of pianist Bill Evans' recordings were in a trio format, making this quintet date a nice change of pace. Evans' all-star group consists of tenor saxophonist Harold Land, guitarist Kenny Burrell, bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Philly Joe Jones and the results are quite tasteful and explorative in a subtle way. This version of Thad Jones' "A Child Is Born" is most memorable. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1977 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Bill Evans was at his best playing solo piano; his touch, harmonic and rhythmic creativity, phrasing, and total technique were so accomplished that he needed ideal accompanists to excel in any trio or group situation. But when playing unaccompanied, he was free to explore any and all directions, developing and exploiting them without concern about other musicians following, fitting in, or expanding the territory behind or underneath him. There were only five cuts on this 1975 date, and the superb CD remastering illuminates Evans' brilliant solos. It offers a textbook example of how Evans opened, developed, and finished a composition; he examined it to the utmost, explored multiple options with flair, then concluded it in spectacular fashion. ~ Ron Wynn
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Yet more Bill Evans live dates continue to flood the landscape posthumously, but this one was recorded under most inviting and unusual conditions. The locale was Pete Douglas' Bach Dancing and Dynamite Society, a second-floor, 250-seat rumpus room overlooking the Pacific near Half Moon Bay, CA, whose wood-paneled ambience and nine-foot Steinway D piano inspired some of the better live work from Evans during this period of his life. Again in his favored trio format, with bassist Eddie Gómez (who gets ample solo room) and drummer Marty Morell in totally simpatico communication, Evans gives himself opportunities to swing hard as well as traffic in his patented mode of harmonically complex introspection. Included are an excellent take on "Waltz for Debby" and a couple of contemporary pop near-standards, "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" and "Who Can I Turn To (When Nobody Needs Me)," and the set peaks with a closing pair of elegantly swinging waltzes, "How My Heart Sings" and "Someday My Prince Will Come." The aging tape has dropouts, but the sound quality is quite acceptable in true stereo and superior to that of The Secret Sessions from this period. ~ Richard S. Ginell
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Jazz - Released November 1, 1962 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This set is one of two albums (both reissued on CD) recorded by the Bill Evans Trio (with bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Marty Morell) at Copenhagen's Montmartre on one night in 1969 but not released initially until the late '80s. Evans sounds relaxed and swinging playing his usual repertoire. All of the songs (mostly standards) have been recorded by Evans at other times but the pianist's many fans certainly will not mind hearing these "alternate" versions of such tunes as "How Deep Is the Ocean," "How My Heart Sings," "Sleepin' Bee" and a light-hearted "California Here I Come." ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1981 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Recorded at the same Village Vanguard sessions that resulted in Since We Met, this posthumous collection (first put out in 1981 and later reissued on CD) features pianist Bill Evans, bassist Eddie Gómez, and drummer Marty Morell playing material that was passed over for release at the time -- some of the songs were overly familiar, while others were works in progress. But even though the results fall short of classic, they should interest Bill Evans collectors; highlights include remakes of "Re: Person I Knew," "Alfie," "T.T.T. (Twelve Tone Tune)," and "34 Skidoo." ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1982 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This interesting album was originally released posthumously in 1982. Pianist Bill Evans is featured on four duets with his longtime bassist Eddie Gomez in 1974-75, exploring a quartet of superior standards. The second half of the program (which dates from 1973 and 1975) is not on the same level. Evans is heard playing two songs he was not all that familiar with late at night at a club, and he performs two other songs and a wandering medley while rehearsing in a recording studio. Being a musical perfectionist, it is a bit doubtful if he would have wanted this music to be released although longtime Bill Evans collectors will find the explorations to be intriguing. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released June 3, 2016 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1967 | Verve

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Bill Evans' 1963 album Plays the Theme from The V.I.P.s and Other Great Songs features the legendary pianist eschewing his more introspective sound for a commercial pop approach. Working with an orchestral background courtesy of conductor/arranger Claus Ogerman (uncredited here), Evans delves into songs by such writers as Henry Mancini, Johnny Mercer, Elmer Bernstein, Miklós Rózsa, and others. While the album has more to do with light easy listening than deep harmonic jazz exploration, there is much to enjoy here for fans of jazz-inflected '60s pop. ~ Matt Collar
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This CD reissue is the companion to Jazzhouse, for both were recorded on the same night at the Montmartre in Copenhagen. Evans' regular trio of the time (which included bassist Eddie Gómez and drummer Marty Morell) is in exuberant form performing before an enthusiastic crowd. In addition to versions of his famous "Waltz for Debby" and "Time Remembered," Evans plays seven of his favorite standards, including "You're Gonna Hear from Me," "Nardis," and "Emily." An excellent all-around set that was not originally released until 1988. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
A previously unreleased concert recording by the legendary Bill Evans would be great news anyway, but this one is particularly special because it documents a 1979 performance at Southeastern Louisiana University, Evans' alma mater and a place for which he had especially warm feelings. Accompanied by the young bassist Marc Johnson and drummer Joe La Barbera, Evans plays a generous set of familiar tunes, including such standbys as "Re: Person I Knew," "Turn Out the Stars," and "I Loves You, Porgy." The album's last track is a six-minute interview conducted by Rod Starns. Although the sound quality is iffy -- the stereo balance is tilted markedly to the listener's left and the drums are poorly miked -- the program is excellent and Evans is playing near peak form. Johnson's playing betrays a strong Scott LaFaro influence, especially on his two duets with Evans and on the trio's shimmering performance of "Someday My Prince Will Come." This disc is a valuable historical document, but it's also a genuine pleasure to listen to. ~ Rick Anderson
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2003 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Native New Yorker Mike Harris is neither a professional musician nor a behind the scenes employee of the music industry; he has earned his living as an optical physicist. But he's someone who Bill Evans' hardcore fans should adore. Harris, himself a truly devoted fan, taped numerous Evans appearances at Manhattan's Village Vanguard in the '60s and '70s and asked owner Max Gordon for permission when he first started taping. Originally, Harris didn't mean for any of the recordings to be released commercially; they were strictly for his private collection. But Harris eventually realized that his gold mine needed to be shared with other Evans devotees, and in 1996 (after he went through the proper legal channels), many of those recordings found their way to Milestone/Fantasy's eight-CD, 104-track box set The Secret Sessions. As generous as that release was, Harris still had an abundance of unreleased Evans performances in his Vanguard collection -- and in 2003, some more of them became commercially available on the single-CD Getting Sentimental. While The Secret Sessions spans 1966-1975, this 73-minute disc focuses on one night: January 15, 1978, when Evans was joined by bassist Michael Moore (not to be confused with the liberal filmmaker/political activist or the American reedman who has made waves on the Amsterdam-based creative music scene) and drummer Philly Joe Jones. The sound quality is decent -- not fantastic, but decent -- and Evans' acoustic pianism is consistently solid on familiar material that ranges from "Emily" and "But Beautiful" to his own "Turn Out the Stars." Jones is a definite asset, and even though Moore doesn't enjoy as strong a rapport with Evans as Eddie Gomez and Scott LaFaro had enjoyed, he plays reasonably well. Getting Sentimental isn't essential and isn't recommended to casual listeners; nonetheless, Evans' more obsessive fans will welcome this enjoyable, if imperfect, release with open arms. ~ Alex Henderson
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Riverside

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Pop - Released January 1, 2004 | Concord Records

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Jazz - Released May 19, 1986 | Verve Reissues