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Jazz - Released January 1, 2014 | Verve Reissues

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released March 4, 1985 | Verve

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects - The Qobuz Standard
This collaboration (reissued on CD) is predictably dull. Bill Evans and his 1965 trio (which also includes bassist Chuck Israels and drummer Larry Bunker) meet a symphony orchestra conducted and arranged by Claus Ogerman. They perform adaptations of six classical themes plus a pair of Evans compositions ("Time Remembered" and "My Bells") but, as one might expect, the strings weigh down the music and Evans' improvisations are somewhat buried beneath the unimaginative arrangements. This is one of Bill Evans' least significant recordings, a weak third stream effort. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released March 10, 2017 | Riverside

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released July 31, 2015 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Bill Evans' Fantasy recordings of 1973-1979 have often been underrated in favor of his earlier work but, as this remarkable nine-CD set continually shows, the influential pianist continued to grow as a musician through the years while holding on to his original conception and distinctive sound. The collection has all of the 98 selections recorded at Evans' 11 Fantasy sessions, including nine numbers from a previously unreleased 1976 concert with his trio. In addition, Evans' appearance on Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz radio program is tacked on as a bonus and it is actually among McPartland's finest shows, a fascinating hour of discussion and music with Evans. Nearly all of the performances on this box (which includes duets with bassist Eddie Gomez and singer Tony Bennett, trio outings with Gomez and either Marty Morell or Eliot Zigmund on drums, and a couple of quintet sets with the likes of tenors Harold Land and Warne Marsh, altoist Lee Konitz, guitarist Kenny Burrell, bassist Ray Brown, and drummer Philly Joe Jones) is available individually on CD but Bill Evans' more passionate collectors will certainly want this definitive box. The only minus is Gene Lees' typically self-serving liner notes; he always seems to love to write about himself. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released December 1, 1967 | Verve

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1975 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Verve

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released April 22, 2016 | Resonance Records

Distinctions Best New Reissue
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Verve Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
In the '60s the jazz pianist Bill Evans would occasionally record an orchestral "easy listening" session to pay the bills, with predictably mediocre results. But FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, while certainly easy on the ears, is also one of Evans' most intriguing "lost" records, brought to us courtesy of Verve's winning "By Request" series. The novelty is that Evans plays both Fender Rhodes and acoustic piano simultaneously in real time, trading off themes and improvs with deliberative taste and, of course, rare skill. The sessions were produced by Evans' long-time, protective manager Helen Keane, so there was little danger of "selling out." Unobtrusively arranged by Michael Leonard, this 1969 release resembles nothing so much as famed bossa nova composer Antonio Carlos Jobim's series of shimmering instrumental albums with arranger Claus Ogerman, even without those gently relentless rhythms driving every tune. Still, the highlight of this album is the dancing two-part "The Dolphin - Before & After," a non-Jobim bossa nova which allows Evans his only extended improvisations.
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1967 | Verve Reissues

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
What separated this from the average good Bill Evans date was the inclusion of Shelly Manne on drums, who inventively pushed and took unexpected chances. This was, I believe, Eddie Gomez' (bass) debut release with Evans (piano) and it was quite impressive. There were numerous takes at this session and judging from Chuck Briefer's liners it might be interesting to hear them released. ~ Bob Rusch, Cadence
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1990 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
The Bill Evans Trio's 1973 concert in Tokyo was his first recording for Fantasy and it produced yet another Grammy-nomination for the presentation. With bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Marty Morell, this LP mixes offbeat songs with overlooked gems, familiar standards, and surprisingly, only one Evans composition, the demanding "T.T.T.T. (Twelve Tone Tune Two)." Bobbie Gentry's "Mornin' Glory" was an unusual choice to open the performance and seems a bit conservative for Evans. The adrenaline picks up considerably with his midtempo waltzing take of Jerome Kern's "Up with the Lark" and a driving "My Romance." Evans also revisits the twisting Scott LaFaro tune "Gloria's Step," which showcases both Gomez and Morell. The closer, "On Green Dolphin Street," is given a slight bossa nova flavor and isn't nearly as aggressive as most of the pianist's live recordings of this popular standard. Although this CD doesn't rank among the Top Five live dates recorded by Evans, it should be considered an essential part of his discography. It seems odd that no additional music turned up for this reissue, as the concert is just under an hour long. ~ Ken Dryden
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1971 | Columbia

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released June 3, 2016 | Epic - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This CD's booklet liner notes written by Gene Lees tell as much -- if not more -- of the story about the circumstances surrounding this session as the music itself. Though in retrospect Lees hears added value in these solo piano works from Bill Evans, there is a palpable and recognizable deterioration in the great pianist's ability to perform at his optimal genius level. In trouble with heroin addiction during 1963 when these tracks were documented, Evans both struggles and prevails through his drug-induced haze to produce an effort that is at many times expectedly brilliant -- the prerequisite and operative word being effort. Where Evans was normally fluid and cool to the point of nonchalance, here he is as much poignant and inventive as he is distracted and removed at times from the melodies. Since this endeavor is his first as a solo pianist, and the second issued volume of these sessions minus outtakes, perhaps Evans was more uncomfortable without rhythm mates and not as confident. The story told by Lees, with his undeniable support for Evans and frank honestly about his plight, needs to be read and understood. It is Evans as an incredible player -- albeit diminished on any minimal or distinguishable level -- that deserves close attention to appreciate both his beauty and pain. During "Love Is Here to Stay," Evans is clearly having difficulty, yet he rallies out of an unsure thought to carry this theme onward. On "What Kind of Fool Am I?" (misidentified by Lees in the liner notes as "Who Can I Turn To?"), the pianist recalls a pensive and introspective, almost gut-wrenching mood, perhaps a self-examination of his condition. The better reinterpretations include a wonderfully spacious version of "All the Things You Are," a playful medley of "Autumn in New York" and "How About You?," and the lively jazzed-up "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town." The tricky Charlie Parker bop anthem "Ornithology" has the pianist rambling off the beaten path in a carefree but a rough dissertation. Apparently Evans did not care for these recordings, but listeners have two CD editions to enjoy, and despite his lessened capacity, they are still enjoyable in their flawed but brilliant way. After all, this is the great Bill Evans, and he remains so for all time. ~ Michael G. Nastos
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | Concord Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
An obscure Bill Evans trio set (with bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Philly Joe Jones), On Green Dolphin Street went unissued until the mid-'70s, when the pianist decided that it was worth releasing as a fine example of Chambers' work. Very much a spontaneous set -- it was recorded after the rhythm section made part of a record accompanying trumpeter Chet Baker -- the group runs through a few standards such as "You and the Night and the Music," "Green Dolphin Street," and two versions of "Woody 'N You." Although lacking the magic of Evans' regular bands, the date has its strong moments, and the pianist's fans will be interested in getting this early sampling of his work. [Some reissues include a special bonus, the rare first take of "All of You" from the legendary Village Vanguard engagement by the 1961 Evans Trio with bassist Scott LaFaro and drummer Paul Motian.] ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Milestone

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This long-lost session, not released initially until 1982, features pianist Bill Evans, tenor saxophonist Zoot Sims, guitarist Jim Hall, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Philly Joe Jones interpreting seven of the pianist's recent originals. Due to some difficulties during the recording process (none of the sidemen were familiar with the often complex numbers), the results were originally shelved and lost for a couple of decades. This CD reissue shows that the music was actually much better than originally thought. While "Time Remembered," "Funkallero," and "My Bells" would become Evans standards, it is quite interesting to hear such forgotten obscurities as "Loose Bloose" (heard in two versions), "There Came You," "Fun Ride," and "Fudgesickle Built for Four"; a couple of the songs could stand to be revived. It is a pity that Evans and Sims (a logical combination) never did record together again. ~ Scott Yanow