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Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Daniil Trifonov's journey around the world of Rachmaninov is at an end. The pianist has arrived safely into the harbour with Yannick Nézet-Seguin's Philadelphia Orchestra. This finale was inspired by the bells which are ubiquitous in the Great Russian soundscape. Alain Corbin explained their importance to the rhythmic and symbolic scansion of everyday life in 19th Century France in his book Village Bells. To the historian's analysis, we can now add the testimony of the pianist – who, like Rachmaninov, grew up in Novgorod. Russian bells leant Russian music its nobility and colouring of folk nostalgia. Daniil Trifonov hasn't forgotten this, as is clear from his piano transcription of the first episode of Les Cloches. He was wise enough to respect the operatic power of the score and the splendour of its orchestration: harp, celesta and flutes are all truly transformed into bells in the hands of a musician who stays true to the aura of disquieting oddness (with its shades of Edgar Allen Poe) which surrounds the first movement. His technique matches his capricious and bubbling imagination. While we might find ourselves yawning a little at the Vocalise, the first and third Concertos move us from thrilling ecstasies to tears of pleasure. A very fine record, in which the orchestra, perhaps a little distant, fulfils its role as a soundbox for the soloist. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 13, 2019 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Keyboard Concertos - Released October 12, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
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Solo Piano - Released February 16, 2018 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Unfortunately no, dear reader, there is no such thing as a cycle of “24 Preludes” by Rachmaninoff; however there are indeed 24 Preludes: a collection of ten Op. 23 from 1903, 13 other Op. 32 from 1910 and one isolated Prelude from the Morceaux de fantaisie Op. 3 (Fantasy Pieces) from 1893. In total: 24 Preludes, in which as a simple count shows Rachmaninoff − much like Chopin and of course Bach − illustrated all major and minor tones. Deliberately random, or the involuntary drive to create a reasonably coherent cycle? Contrary to his two illustrious predecessors, Rachmaninoff didn’t order his Preludes according to a specific tonal plan: the musician’s fantasy develops bit by bit. Nikolai Lugansky – described by the famous magazine Gramophone as “the most innovative and transcendent interpreter of all” (so much for the others…), truly an extraordinarily deep and polyvalent pianist – decided to present the Preludes in the order prescribed by partitions, rather than reorganising them according to some hypothetical tonal logic, without knowing if Rachmaninoff would even have recommended or even considered it, particularly as the constant alternation of moods, independently of any tonal consideration, gives the piece a sense of perfect coherence. Finally it’s worth mentioning that Lugansky offers a very “original” interpretation of this divine music, which may feel like a re-discovery to some listeners. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released April 12, 2019 | Naxos

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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released March 10, 2017 | Sony Classical

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Trios - Released May 3, 2019 | harmonia mundi

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Rachmaninoff's output of chamber music is small but all the more precious for that. Two absolute gems bear witness to the fact: these ‘elegiac trios’, which were produced by a young composer still indisputably under the influence of Tchaikovsky. But Rachmaninoff’s personality is already fully present, reaching heights of emotion and expressiveness. The pieces by Suk and Grieg add a further touch of character to the picture, which is painted with an exceptionally rich palette: the artistry of the phenomenal Trio Wanderer! © harmonia mundi
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Classical - Released February 2, 2018 | BIS

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Oh no, it’s not the program of this album that’s any kind of news – after all, Rachmaninov’s Second and Third piano concertos have been recorded over and over again by dozen pianists since their very composition – but the interpretation of Russian pianist Yevgeny Sudbin, born in 1980 in Saint-Petersburg. Hailed by “The Daily Telegraph” as ‘potentially one of the greatest pianists of the 21st century’, Yevgeny Sudbin released his first album on BIS in 2005. Since then his recordings have met with critical acclaim and have been regularly featured as “CD of the Month” by the highly choosy BBC Music Magazine or “Editor’s Choice” by the none less choosy Gramophone. Sudbin performs regularly in prestigious venues such as London’s Royal Festival Hall and Queen Elizabeth Hall, the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the Tonhalle Zurich, the Avery Fisher Hall in New York. Recent engagements have included performances with the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Concertgebouw Orchestra, the Gewandhaus Leipzig, and Philharmonia Orchestra. His love of chamber music has resulted in partnerships with musicians including Hilary Hahn, Julia Fischer and the Chilingirian Quartet among others. Appearances at festivals include Aspen, La Roque d’Anthéron, Mostly Mozart and Verbier. In 2016 he was nominated Artist of the Year at the prestigious Gramophone Classical Music Awards. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 14, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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How bad is it? Right from the colossal chords that open Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 2, it's bad. Lang Lang starts slow and gets slower until he nearly stops the music, destroying the rhythmic intensity and the harmonic tension. When Valery Gergiev brings in the Orchestra of the Marinsky Theatre, the tempo snaps into place for the first theme and Gergiev holds the music at tempo until the second theme. Then, once again, Lang starts slow and gets slower until he's nearly stopped the music, destroying the lyrical line and the momentum. When Gergiev brings the Orchestra back in, the tempo snaps back into place for the development and Gergiev keeps the music at tempo until the cadenza. Then, once again, Lang starts slow and gets slower until he's nearly stopped the music, destroying the formal drama and the structural integrity. And so it goes for the rest of the Concerto, with Gergiev holding to the tempo and Lang slowing to a stop until the music is ultimately tattered and torn between them. It's not that Lang lacks the technique. The billions of notes of Rachmaninov's Paganini Rhapsody are in place. It's not that Lang lacks the tone. The depth of sound of the Andante Cantabile Variation is enormous. It's that Lang lacks the taste and temperament. His playing is self-amused and self-indulgent. He's so enraptured by his own playing that he starts slow to show off and he gets slower to admire his own performance. It's narcissism as an interpretive strategy. Deutsche Grammophon is dark and hooded.
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Sacred Vocal Music - Released March 10, 2015 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released February 24, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released October 18, 2010 | naïve classique

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Concertos - Released November 10, 2014 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released October 21, 2016 | Erato - Warner Classics

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There is no shortage of recordings of Rachmaninov's Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18, one of the most popular pieces in the classical repertory ever since its slow-movement clarinet solo underlaid the quintessence of cinematic romance, Brief Encounter. But this one, by pianist Alexandre Tharaud (he may not be as well known as the decision to omit his first name in the graphics would presume, but he's getting there), is worth strong consideration. It's not blood-and-thunder Rachmaninov, so those seeking that in the C minor concerto might look elsewhere. But there's absolute clarity throughout, and with that an attractively variable dialogue with the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra under Alexander Vedernikov, one of the unsung Russian conductors who are having the times of their lives in Britain these days. Perhaps the highlight of the album is the early set of Cinq Morceaux de fantaisie, Op. 3, in which Tharaud's way with a restrained but involving narrative thread comes to the fore. Sample the character piece "Polichinelle" in F sharp minor. The version of the Vocalise, Op. 34, here is unremarkable, and the two Pieces for six hands at the end are not the virtuoso showpieces that might be imagined, but rather salon novelties. So the program peters out somewhat. But those in search of an elegant C minor concerto or near-definitive Cinq Morceaux de fantaisie should hear this release.
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Symphonic Music - Released February 2, 2018 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Record of the Month - Le Choix de France Musique - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released September 28, 2018 | Berlin Classics

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