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Thanks to the hard work carried out in cooperation with recording studios as well as an increasing number of music labels (Plus Loin Music, Bee Jazz, Ambronay Editions, Zig Zag Territoires, ECM, Mirare, Aeolus, Ondine, Winter & Winter, Laborie, etc.), Qobuz now offers a rapidly-growing selection of new releases and back catalogue records in 24-bit HD quality. These albums reproduce exactly the sound from the studio recording, and offer a more comfortable listening experience that exceeds the sound quality of a CD (typically \"reduced\" for mastering at 44.1kHz/16-bit). \"Qobuz HD\" files are DRM-free and are 100% compatible with both Mac and PC. Moving away from the MP3-focused approach that has evolved over recent years at the expense of sound quality, Qobuz provides the sound calibre expected by all music lovers, allowing them to enjoy both the convenience and quality of online music.

Note 24-bit HD albums sold by Qobuz are created by our labels directly. They are not re-encoded using SACD and we guarantee their direct source. In order to continue on this path, we prohibit any tampering with the product.

HI-RES€16.49
CD€11.99

Rock - Released February 10, 2014 | Heavenly Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
Temples are four young lads from Kettering who for all purposes sound like they just popped in from 1967 after a short trip on a paisley-bedecked TARDIS. They don't miss a single sonic trick; from soaring 12-string jangle to backwards-tracked guitars, flowing vocal harmonies, swooning Mellotrons, and baroque organ interludes, they know their musical history like they lived through it. Their 2014 debut, Sun Structures, is a nostalgia trip for sure, while at the same time sounding totally modern too. The band's vocalist/guitarist, James Bagshaw, produced the album and he goes for a sound that's happily mired in the past, but has a cleanly scrubbed punch that gives the album some real power. For example, the drums have a kick that would have been hard to get in 1967 unless you recorded at EMI Studio Two with George Martin at the helm. Bagshaw and the rest of the band also prove to be masterful at layering sounds together, dropping parts in and out for dramatic effect, bringing in surprising bits of flair (like the harp on "Keep in the Dark"), conjuring up impressively diverse guitar tones, and generally making the kind of record bands wish they could have made back then. Many of Temples' contemporaries wish they could have made this record too, because not only does it sound amazing, but the songs are like a collection of hit singles mashed together in a 54-minute cavalcade of brilliant melodies, singable choruses, and mesmerizing rhythms. Chief among them is the album's first track, "Shelter Song," which kicks things off in the clouds with a divine melody and some hilariously pretentious but sweet lyrics, and really lets you know right away that the band is doing something special. The rest of the album flows from trippy psych pop ballads ("Move with the Season") to gaily skipping, Donovan-esque rambles ("Keep in the Dark") to hard-as-granite blues stompers with heavy guitars ("A Question Isn't Answered") to poppy tracks that bubble like melted chocolate and have a hard-candy crunch ("Mesmerise") to epic-sounding, slowly unspooling psych jams ("Test of Time") as Temples merrily grab everything from the past that works and effortlessly makes it work for them. The only possible complaint one might have with the record is that everything sounds just right, that it's maybe too perfect of a re-creation of the past without enough of their own personality injected into the proceedings. In this case, though, Temples play with enough energy, Bagshaw sings with enough angelically pure emotion, and the overall project flows with enough sonic imagination that they easily avoid the charge. Sun Structures is an impressive debut that would be legendary now if it had been released in 1967; in 2014 it's merely the best psych pop around. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
HI-RES€13.49
CD€8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 13, 2014 | Sardanapale Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€11.99
CD€7.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 6, 2014 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
The title is quintessentially Stephen Malkmus -- a conflation of two slang terms, one dating back to the hazed-out '60s, the other a vulgar remnant of modernity -- and, as it happens, Wig Out at Jagbags also sounds quintessentially Malkmusian. It's elastic guitar rock constructed partially out of cannabis guitar jams and partially out of punk rock squalls, both sides distinguished by wry melodicism and dexterous wordplay, not to mention Malkmus' lingering tendency to hide his accessible inclinations under sheets of six-strings. On 2011's Mirror Traffic, producer Beck prevented the Jicks from taking detours, but here the band is producing on its own, assisted by Remko Schouten, so they're free to follow wherever their whims may take them. In the past, the untrammeled Jicks usually pursued one of their twin obsessions -- either riding out a cool, non-funky groove or opening up the skies with guitars, ideally blending the two -- but here, there's a distinct mellowing as the forays into psychedelia and noise skronk are tempered as Malkmus once again finds fascination in colorful, swaying pop. Often, this takes the form of updated latter-day Pavement -- the sing-song "Lariat" and "Cinnamon and Lesbians" find their roots in Brighten the Corners -- but no matter if Malkmus is singing about "music from the Best Decade Ever," there's no sense of nostalgia here, no suspicion that he'd rather be playing with a reunited Pavement than the Jicks, perhaps because Wig Out at Jagbags -- the first album he's recorded since reuniting with his '90s band in 2010; it's the also the first without Janet Weiss, who left in 2010 to play with Wild Flag and has been replaced by Jake Morris -- is nimble in a way Malkmus has rarely been. As the Jicks trim their improvisations, they retain a mischievous spirit -- witness the cheery horn stabs of "Chartjunk," which swaggers like prime crossover Spoon and thereby raises the question of whether the song is a piss-take -- which means that even if Wig Out at Jagbags is quieter than, say, 2008's churning Real Emotional Trash, it feels looser than most of the Jicks records; the compositions are tight but the attitude is ragged, which winds up being more infectious and fun than albums where the songs drift but the instruments are tight. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2014 | Capitol Records (CAP)

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio - Grammy Awards
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Rock - Released October 18, 2013 | UDR

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€14.99
CD€9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 26, 2013 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€17.99
CD€11.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 26, 2013 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
CD€19.49

Alternative & Indie - Released April 19, 2013 | Atlantic Records UK

Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk
Somewhat sneakily, as they honed their blend of new wave, synth pop, soft rock, and all things '80s for the better part of a decade, Phoenix became one of the most influential acts of the 2000s and 2010s. When they married that distinctive style to some of their strongest songs on 2009's Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix, that album's mainstream success felt like a well-earned reward for their years of defining a sound that had permeated a lot of pop culture. Its follow-up, Bankrupt!, isn't nearly as devoid of new ideas as its title suggests, but it doesn't feel like quite the leap forward Wolfgang was compared to what came before it. Not that it necessarily needs to be; Phoenix sound more comfortable and confident than ever on songs like the lead single, "Entertainment," which defines almost everything that they do on the rest of the album with its galloping beats, earnest vocals, and Asian-tinged keyboard melodies. "Trying to Be Cool," "Don't," and "Oblique City" also carry over the bouncy irresistibility of the band's breakthrough, and even if they don't have the star-making power that "1901" and "Lisztomania" did, they reveal Phoenix's deep love and even deeper knowledge of '80s pop magic in their deft major-to-minor key changes and strategically placed buildups and breakdowns. These little touches help the band stand out among its like-minded contemporaries, and it helps that Phoenix have been drawing inspiration from the '80s longer than that decade actually existed (the fact that they mixed Bankrupt! on the console used in the making of Michael Jackson's Thriller might have contributed some good '80s karma as well). Elsewhere, they pay lip service to another of that decade's icons with "Drakkar Noir," and the way Thomas Mars pronounces it almost makes the overbearing cologne cool again. Here and on "The Real Thing," the band ponders and crosses the line between real and fake, taking it to new levels on "S.O.S. in Bel Air," which could reignite the debate between Strokes and Phoenix fans over who copied who first (and who does it better). Later on, things get interesting -- particularly for longtime fans -- when the band indulges its experimental side on songs like the seven-minute title track, which prefaces Mars' vocals with a lengthy stretch of baroque keyboards, and the expansive melancholy of "Chloroform" and "Bourgeois." Even if moments like these aren't exactly in keeping with the sound that broke Phoenix, they're a reminder that the bandmembers ultimately became popular by being themselves. Bankrupt! lets them celebrate with a victory lap that's enjoyable for all concerned. © Heather Phares /TiVo
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 19, 2013 | Atlantic Records UK

Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk
Somewhat sneakily, as they honed their blend of new wave, synth pop, soft rock, and all things '80s for the better part of a decade, Phoenix became one of the most influential acts of the 2000s and 2010s. When they married that distinctive style to some of their strongest songs on 2009's Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix, that album's mainstream success felt like a well-earned reward for their years of defining a sound that had permeated a lot of pop culture. Its follow-up, Bankrupt!, isn't nearly as devoid of new ideas as its title suggests, but it doesn't feel like quite the leap forward Wolfgang was compared to what came before it. Not that it necessarily needs to be; Phoenix sound more comfortable and confident than ever on songs like the lead single, "Entertainment," which defines almost everything that they do on the rest of the album with its galloping beats, earnest vocals, and Asian-tinged keyboard melodies. "Trying to Be Cool," "Don't," and "Oblique City" also carry over the bouncy irresistibility of the band's breakthrough, and even if they don't have the star-making power that "1901" and "Lisztomania" did, they reveal Phoenix's deep love and even deeper knowledge of '80s pop magic in their deft major-to-minor key changes and strategically placed buildups and breakdowns. These little touches help the band stand out among its like-minded contemporaries, and it helps that Phoenix have been drawing inspiration from the '80s longer than that decade actually existed (the fact that they mixed Bankrupt! on the console used in the making of Michael Jackson's Thriller might have contributed some good '80s karma as well). Elsewhere, they pay lip service to another of that decade's icons with "Drakkar Noir," and the way Thomas Mars pronounces it almost makes the overbearing cologne cool again. Here and on "The Real Thing," the band ponders and crosses the line between real and fake, taking it to new levels on "S.O.S. in Bel Air," which could reignite the debate between Strokes and Phoenix fans over who copied who first (and who does it better). Later on, things get interesting -- particularly for longtime fans -- when the band indulges its experimental side on songs like the seven-minute title track, which prefaces Mars' vocals with a lengthy stretch of baroque keyboards, and the expansive melancholy of "Chloroform" and "Bourgeois." Even if moments like these aren't exactly in keeping with the sound that broke Phoenix, they're a reminder that the bandmembers ultimately became popular by being themselves. Bankrupt! lets them celebrate with a victory lap that's enjoyable for all concerned. © Heather Phares /TiVo
HI-RES€14.99
CD€9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 7, 2013 | accelera son

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€19.49
CD€13.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Virgin EMI

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Rock - Released November 12, 2012 | Warner (France)

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€11.99
CD€7.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 6, 2012 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€14.99
CD€9.99

Pop/Rock - Released February 7, 2012 | Blues Power Band

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Rock and Folk - Hi-Res Audio