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Qobuz’s experts gather all the essentials of each genre. These albums have marked music history and become major landmarks.

With the Ideal Discography you (re)discover legendary recordings, all whilst building on your musical knowledge.

Albums

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 28, 2016 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Neo Geo innovator and international musical collaborator Ryuichi Sakamoto has run the gamut in his lengthy career, from the Kraftwerk-inspired work of the Yellow Magic Orchestra and a handful of high-profile soundtracks, to several solo albums and various guest spots with Arto Lindsay, David Sylvian, Thomas Dolby, and Public Image Ltd., among many others. And on the heels of the YMO's breakup in 1983, Sakamoto jumped right into the fray with this soundtrack to director Nagisa Oshima's Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (Sakamoto also co-starred along with David Bowie). While not as sophisticated as the music he wrote for The Sheltering Sky and The Last Emperor (a collaboration with David Byrne), Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence does sport one of Sakamoto's most fetching pieces, "ForbiddenColours" (given many treatments, including a fine David Sylvian vocal version), and a few successful Asian and Western classical hybrids. Unfortunately, though, the music often bogs down in bloated, synth-washed musings and staid rhythmic underpinnings. Not the best introduction to Sakamoto's work, but certainly worth a cut-out bin price for the lovely variations on "Forbidden Colours." © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 4, 2015 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released March 23, 2015 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Neo Geo innovator and international musical collaborator Ryuichi Sakamoto has run the gamut in his lengthy career, from the Kraftwerk-inspired work of the Yellow Magic Orchestra and a handful of high-profile soundtracks, to several solo albums and various guest spots with Arto Lindsay, David Sylvian, Thomas Dolby, and Public Image Ltd., among many others. And on the heels of the YMO's breakup in 1983, Sakamoto jumped right into the fray with this soundtrack to director Nagisa Oshima's Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (Sakamoto also co-starred along with David Bowie). While not as sophisticated as the music he wrote for The Sheltering Sky and The Last Emperor (a collaboration with David Byrne), Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence does sport one of Sakamoto's most fetching pieces, "ForbiddenColours" (given many treatments, including a fine David Sylvian vocal version), and a few successful Asian and Western classical hybrids. Unfortunately, though, the music often bogs down in bloated, synth-washed musings and staid rhythmic underpinnings. Not the best introduction to Sakamoto's work, but certainly worth a cut-out bin price for the lovely variations on "Forbidden Colours." © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 31, 2014 | Larghetto

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 9, 2014 | RCA Victor - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 9, 2014 | RCA - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released December 4, 2014 | EMI Music Publishing Italia Srl

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 24, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 27, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 27, 2014 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Capping off the composer's longstanding partnership with producer Irwin Allen, The Towering Inferno is quintessential John Williams -- for better and for worse. There's no denying Williams' uncanny sense of scale. His themes are explosive and emotional, galvanized by massive brass flourishes and soaring string arrangements. But what's missing from The Towering Inferno is any sense of subtlety or nuance. Williams seizes upon the film's larger-than-life drama and wrings every moment for maximum suspense and pathos. It's telling that he would emerge as the composer du jour for George Lucas and Steven Spielberg as they steered American film from deeply personal storytelling to mass-market entertainment. This is music devoid of intimacy and heart. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2014 | Abkco Music & Records, Inc.

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One of the most traditional soundtracks for a Wes Anderson film, Grand Budapest Hotel's music sidesteps pop songs in favor of pieces that highlight the story's setting. Befitting a caper set at a Central European hotel in the '30s, Alexandre Desplat's score and performances by ensembles including the Osipov State Russian Folk Orchestra create a lavish, Old World feel. Budapest's orchestral pieces, which include "Concerto for Lute and Plucked Strings I. Moderato" and "The Linden Tree" are particularly charming, setting a genteel mood echoed by the traditional arrangement of "Moonshine." Meanwhile, Desplat's score feels akin to his twinkly, mischievous music for Fantastic Mr. Fox, which was a caper of another sort. Indeed, this might be one of the twinkliest scores to an Anderson film, which is saying something. However, Desplat gives these sparkles nuance and depth, creating an entire vocabulary from them that spans the dreamy "Mr. Moustafa," "Night Train to Nebelsbad"'s jazzy insistence, the lively wit of "The Society of the Crossed Keys," and the oddly comforting "The War (Zero's Theme)." Most excitingly, the high-stakes nature of a heist film like this one allows Desplat to inject more drama and suspense into Anderson's ultra-stylish world, and at times his pieces echo iconic scores such as Dr. Zhivago and The Third Man. The winding melody that is one of the score's major motifs takes on a sinister cast on "The Family Desgoffe und Taxis" and "J.G. Jopling, Private Inquiry Agent," while "The Lutz Police Militia" and "Last Will and Testament" add some menace -- however stylized -- to the proceedings. As always, the collaboration between Anderson, Desplat, and music supervisor Randall Poster sets the mood perfectly, whether that mood is innocence, mischief, mystery, or beauty. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released July 29, 2013 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
CD€7.99

Film Soundtracks - Released July 15, 2013 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
CD€16.99

Film Soundtracks - Released July 12, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
While Mike Nichols' 1966 film of Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? gets more frightening every time you watch it, Alexander North's score to the same film gets more consoling every time you hear it. Nichols' film, particularly the performances by Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, has scenes of terrific intensity, but North's score, though faithful to what's on screen, has a tenderness, even a sweetness, that transforms the ultimate meaning of the film. Part of it is North's characteristically evocative orchestration with some cues delicately scored for guitar, celesta, bass clarinet, harpsichord, and a pair of harps, while others are scored for spare almost spooky winds arrayed against soothing strings. But most of it is North's soaring melodies and brooding harmonies -- and especially his big-hearted main theme. By prefiguring the film's reconciliatory ending, the solace offered by North's score transfigures all the horrors enacted between Taylor and Burton. Though clearly the anonymous studio orchestra wasn't given much time to learn its parts -- the ensemble sometimes flags, the strings' intonation occasionally turns sour -- the individual players' performances are persuasive. The stereo sound is impressive for its clarity and immediacy, but unfortunately the remastering here is so minimal that the sound seems to be coming directly off of an old LP. The inclusion of snippets of Taylor and Burton's dialogue from the film at the start of some tracks is at first disconcerting, but will help orient the listener who hasn't seen the film in a long time. © TiVo
CD€6.99

Film Soundtracks - Released May 6, 2013 | Editions Milan Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 4, 2012 | Cinevox

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Goblin's score to Dario Argento's Suspiria is a timeless, horrifying ride into crazed vibes and buzzing progressive rock. Billed as The Complete Original Motion Picture Soundtrack, this edition goes a bit overboard in its four redundant extra tracks. Before those final additions, Goblin kicks out the jazz-rock jams with cool aplomb and creates a number of genuinely unnerving compositions. Argento fans will swoon being able to hear Suspiria's terror centerpieces "Suspiria," "Witch," and "Sighs." "Suspiria" might contain some dated keyboard work, but the music rings like a demonic version of the score to The Exorcist. A wicked voice chants and hums along to the melody, before the song takes a prog rock departure nearly three minutes in. The song turns into something that Trans Am or their contemporaries might concoct on a better day; in that sense, Goblin's music is ahead of its time. "Witch" is equally creepy; it's the song that acts as the background to the movie's demented opening sequence. The song is as cinematic in its scope as Argento's brutal visuals. "Sighs" might one of the scariest songs ever recorded. Sounding like a throbbing didgeridoo nightmare, it's a monument to tension and suspense. On the remainder of the album, Goblin mostly strives for a cool jazz-rock hybrid. Suspiria works best for fans of the film, who will appreciate the terror of the songs more than newcomers who haven't experienced Argento's darkest creation. The score is as enjoyable removed from the movie as it is attached. Suspiria is quite an achievement, as a scary soundtrack and as a vibe-heavy rock album. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 24, 2012 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 1, 2012 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released September 3, 2012 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Film Soundtracks - Released July 19, 2012 | Les Films 13

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography