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4195 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest and filtered by Concertos
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Concertos - To be released August 28, 2020 | Alpha

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Concertos - To be released July 24, 2020 | Vax Records

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Concertos - Released July 4, 2020 | Bousfield Media

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Concertos - Released June 25, 2020 | Bousfield Media

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Concertos - Released June 19, 2020 | Signum Records

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Concertos - Released June 19, 2020 | Diapason

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Concertos - Released June 18, 2020 | Classicworks

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Concertos - Released June 12, 2020 | Signum Records

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Keyboard Concertos - Released June 12, 2020 | Delicate Piano Selections

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Concertos - Released June 11, 2020 | Rubén Jordán

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Concertos - Released June 10, 2020 | Signum Records

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Concertos - Released June 5, 2020 | Avie Records

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Anna Clyne's cello concerto DANCE was written for cellist Inbal Segev, who plays and fully inhabits it here, with the London Philharmonic under Marin Alsop. It's an extraordinary work that is well worth your time and, with this fine engineering, your money. Ready stylistic comparisons and descriptions do not spring easily to mind, which is all to the good. Clyne's idiom might superficially be called neo-Romantic, and the work's passionate idiom makes it a good pairing with the Elgar Cello Concerto in E minor, Op. 85, that closes out the album (it's also notable that the two works were composed exactly 100 years apart). Yet there is really nothing "neo" about Clyne's work: its language is fresh. There are few melodies, and those that there are, serve the purpose of evoking folk traditions rather than serving as building blocks for the structure. Instead, Clyne sometimes uses energetic cello configurations that sound like Steve Reich's "gradual processes," although she is no minimalist, either: she's far too emotionally intense for that. The 17th century Ruggieri cello Segev plays is part of the fervent sound too. The title DANCE comes from a five-line poem by Rumi, of which the first word of each line is "dance"; the five movement titles come from the rest of each line. Clyne's style is something that must be experienced to be understood, but the fact that it fully stands up to the Elgar concerto, played well, should tell prospective listeners something. © TiVo
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Concertos - Released May 29, 2020 | ARTALINNA

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A disciple of Jean-Marc Luisada at the Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris, the Russian pianist Alexandra Matvievskaya lately immersed herself in the work of Gabriel Fauré, and was quickly fascinated. With incomparable intensity, she expresses its tragic power as much as she exalts its harmonic and polyphonic depth. One of the great Fauré recitals of the last twenty years. © Artalinna
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Concertos - Released May 29, 2020 | Prospero Classical

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Concertos - Released May 27, 2020 | Signum Records

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Concertos - Released May 22, 2020 | Signum Records

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Concertos - Released May 22, 2020 | Zoho

This release by guitarist Sharon Isbin takes its title from the opening guitar concerto by Chris Brubeck, which proposes an affinity between jazz and classical music. Fans of jazzman Dave Brubeck may want the album for this work alone; composed, like all of the rest of the music here, for Isbin, it includes a passage she suggested that is based on one of the elder Brubeck's melodies and has quite a personal flavor. Yet the title may be taken in another way: much of the music is Latin influenced, but also shows affinities with other traditions of the world. This is effective, for the listener keeps expecting the music to slip into conventional Latin sounds, but it never does. Isbin plays on this tension elegantly in the classicized Latinism of composer Leo Brouwer, who wrote his El Decameron Negro for Isbin back in 1981 when she had just appeared on the scene. The least Latin work on the program is the guitar-accompanied three-song cycle by Richard Danielpour with which it concludes. Its texts, by poet Rumi, propose an affinity between the divine and the sensual, both exemplified gloriously by mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard, and one suspects that a performance of the work in a Latin country would be enthusiastically received. The whole project is testimony to how admiration for this extraordinary guitarist has persisted as guitar music has fallen out of fashion and shown signs of rising again. An added attraction is the sound engineering from the Zoho label, known primarily for Latin jazz, R&B, and swing rather than for classical guitar music. Isbin's guitar is straightforwardly and warmly presented, with no extraneous string noise. © TiVo
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Concertos - Released May 21, 2020 | Alessio Miraglia