Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
CD€11.49

Give Out But Don't Give Up (Expanded Edition)

Primal Scream

Alternative & Indie - Released December 2, 2011 | Creation Records

From
CD€8.99

Vanishing Point

Primal Scream

Alternative & Indie - Released July 7, 1997 | Creation Records

Distinctions Sélection du Mercury Prize
Primal Scream found themselves in danger of losing their hip audience in the wake of their misconceived trad-rock record, Give Out But Don't Give Up. As a reaction, they returned to the genre-bending, electronic dance-rock of the seminal Screamadelica for Give Out's follow-up, Vanishing Point. Instead of recycling the dazzlingly bright neo-psychedelia of Screamadelica, Primal Scream reaches deep into cavernous dub and '60s pop. Vanishing Point is a dark, trippy album, filled with mind-bending rhythms and cinematic flourishes. The addition of former Stone Roses bassist Mani to the Scream gives their music an organically funky foundation that had been lacking. Over those rhythms are samples, reverbed guitars, and synthesizers that echo spy movies, Southern soul, and the Stones. Above anything else, Vanishing Point is about sound and groove. Words remain a weak point for Bobby Gillespie, who only manages cohesive lyrics on the swirling "Burning Wheel" and "Star," but that is a secondary concern, since Primal Scream is at its best when working the rhythms. Songs like "Kowalski" and, in particular, the extended instrumentals of "Get Duffy" and "Trainspotting" illustrate that the group is still capable of creating exotic, thoroughly entrancing sounds, which is what makes Vanishing Point a remarkable comeback. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€8.99

XTRMNTR

Primal Scream

Alternative & Indie - Released May 2, 2000 | Creation Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Whenever indie music seems lost in its own self-righteous, unchallenging, inoffensive fundament, Primal Scream rides in to try and save it all. So just as Screamadelica tried to encapsulate the importance of ecstasy culture, or Vanishing Point tried to exorcise their own insanity, here XTRMNTR is a nasty, fierce realization of an entire world that has also lost the plot. The album starts with a gloriously vindictive sample of a kid commanding "Kill All Hippies," and this roughly states the album's modus operandi. There are songs shouting with furious, feedback-splayed anger ("Blood Money," "Exterminator"), songs of club-based revolt (both house-influenced versions of "Swastika Eyes"), and songs of utterly manic desperation ("Accelerator"). The album only lurches when lead singer Bobby Gillespie's weedy vocals can't keep up with the black noise of the music. "Insect Royalty" meanders and mumbles with a blank approach. "Pills" is a half-realized hip-hop song, with Gillespie diminishing its power on every verse (it only saves itself when it caps the song off with the album's central theme: "Sick f*ck f*ck sick f*ck f*ck sick f*ck"). Thankfully, Scream's highs, such as the gentleness of "Keep Your Dreams" (sounding like the third sibling to 1991's "I'm Coming Down" or 1997's "Star"), as well as the inversely monstrous and apocalyptic "MBV Arkestra (If They Move, Kill 'Em)," shower down with purely visceral poise. The album is not the flawless statement against complacency the band seemed to strive for, but it succeeds at tearing heads off, shooting fascists, and quickly asking questions later with unbelievable fury. For these reasons alone, it easily serves as one of the band's highest marks. These aren't the aggro-simpleton maneuvers of bands like Rage Against the Machine or Korn; the implosive production and sheer political belief prove that ingenuity must come hand in hand with "statement" if an idea is to come across effectively. XTRMNTR is simply a protest -- sonically as well as lyrically -- and maybe this would be a fine time to once again rally behind something worthwhile. © Dean Carlson /TiVo
From
CD€8.99

Give Out But Don't Give Up

Primal Scream

Alternative & Indie - Released September 7, 2010 | Creation Records

What do you do when you redefine the parameters of modern music? If you're Primal Scream, you decide to head to Memphis to tap into the vein of Real American Music, a move that unintentionally mirrors U2's pilgrimage on Rattle & Hum but lacks the Irish supergroup's piousness. It's hard for Primal Scream to be self-righteous, not when they're singing about sleaze in an attempt to live up to their rock & roll dreams, but Give Out But Don't Give Up is hampered by the group's stylized idolization. Initially, the group planned to cut Give Out with Tom Dowd, the producer who helmed innumerable classics released on Atlantic Records, but the sessions were wan, so Creation head Alan McGee decided George Drakoulias -- the producer who was riding high on his work with the Black Crowes -- to punch up the tapes. Drakoulias made the sessions listenable -- bigger, bolder, and confident -- but he couldn't quite disguise that the record was misconceived at its core. Classic rock wasn't a foreign concept for Primal Scream -- "Movin' on Up" spun Stephen Stills into acid house -- but the group were pastiche artists, showing no mastery of song form or simple musical interaction. At this point, everything existed on the surface for Primal Scream, which is why they could turn out a lark like "Rocks" -- a Faces homage so potent, Rod Stewart would later cover it -- and be so pleased that this one song sounds good, they couldn't be bothered to make the rest of the record work. So, Give Out But Don't Give Up is a mess, a record that suggests it's on the verge of delivering a good time but winds up being a dirgey bummer. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€14.49

Everything's Alright Forever

The Boo Radleys

Pop/Rock - Released February 8, 2010 | Creation Records

From
CD€14.49

Only The Strongest Will Survive

Hurricane #1

Alternative & Indie - Released August 31, 2009 | Creation Records

From
CD€14.49

Souvlaki

Slowdive

Alternative & Indie - Released October 8, 2008 | Creation Records

From
CD€11.49

Riot City Blues (Expanded Edition)

Primal Scream

Alternative & Indie - Released December 2, 2006 | Creation Records

From
CD€11.49

Evil Heat (Expanded Edition)

Primal Scream

Alternative & Indie - Released August 5, 2002 | Creation Records

From
CD€11.49

XTRMNTR (Expanded Edition)

Primal Scream

Alternative & Indie - Released December 2, 1999 | Creation Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD€14.49

Friends & Lovers

Bernard Butler

Pop/Rock - Released February 1, 2000 | Creation Records

For his second album, Friends & Lovers, Bernard Butler trimmed away the folkier elements of his debut -- ironically, those were highlights on People Move On - returning to the sweeping, glam-inflected pop-rock that provided the impetus for Suede. He may have a grander vision and a larger palette, yet he has greater focus this time. Friends & Lovers opens majestically with its title track, surging forward with an anthemic, post-Bowie chorus and subdued psychedelic strings. Butler uses this template throughout the record, delivering songs that blend late-'60s and -'70s rock conventions and clichés in unpredictable ways, never once resorting to irony or pastiche. Butler is a craftsman, laboring on the structure of his songs, the flow of the arrangement, and the sonic texture of the production, resulting in an abundance of great guitar playing and some wonderful harmonies and keyboards, all woven together in a stylish, seamless sonic tapestry. This technique may be sonically resplendent, but it's not without pitfalls. Each track has dazzling moments, yet few stand apart from the pack, largely because, as a frontman, Butler doesn't sell them. His thin voice tends to fade into the mix, becoming part of the wall of sound; consequently, Friends & Lovers gracefully rolls in, then washes away without leaving a lasting impression. This may sound churlish, but this music is crying out for a larger-than-life personality, a vocalist on the level of Brett Anderson. Friends & Lovers must be enjoyed as the work of a meticulous, talented, craftsman, a musician who loves to slowly build his record, track by track, and there's a lot to enjoy on that level, even if it leaves you with a nagging feeling that it could have been something more. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€3.99

You Must Go On

Bernard Butler

Pop/Rock - Released August 10, 1999 | Creation Records

From
CD€14.49

Guerrilla

Super Furry Animals

Pop/Rock - Released June 14, 1999 | Creation Records

It's difficult not to find Super Furry Animals' brand of pop infectious, particularly the collection of numbers compiled for Guerrilla, the band's third full-length and arguably most cohesive -- albeit pleasingly and consistently unpredictable -- one to date. Old-school techno remains in remnants, such as in "Wherever I Lay My Phone (That's My Home)." When it rears its head otherwise, it rests easily beside and within the majority of the fully fledged pop songs. The High Llamas contribute to the dreamy "Turning Tide"; there's the Tropicalia of "Northern Lites," and, as ever, there are shades of punk and distortion in "Night Vision." © Denise Sullivan /TiVo
From
CD€4.99

Beautiful Day

3 Colours Red

Pop/Rock - Released January 11, 1999 | Creation Records

From
CD€14.49

Kingsize

The Boo Radleys

Pop/Rock - Released November 3, 1998 | Creation Records

The band that was hoping for a fresh start on Mercury Records in the interview herein has been dropped instead. They promise an eventual U.S. release for their new opus, but I wouldn't bet the ranch house. The Boos' U.K. success has oddly never translated here, and it seems as if, like Columbia before them, Mercury gave up before they even started. Bastids. Too bad, too, for what might become the first import-only Boos record is one hell of a return from the OK but somewhat confusing C'mon Kids. The once-again self-produced Kingsize manages to perpetuate its predecessor's predilection for peculiar surprise, but reinserts the crucial missing piece, the very strength of the band throughout its history: basic songwriting. C'mon Kids was wonderfully schizophrenic, and it had its moments like the Cheap Trick-ish title track. But MARTIN CARR is really best when absorbed with the sort of starry-eyed melodies that seem just crafted for SICE to croon, in his leisurely, crying voice that enchanted on so many of the band's finest outings, from "The Finest Kiss" all the way to "Reaching Out From Here." Carr and his three mates aren't trying so hard here, either. They let each song breathe, like on Giant Steps, instead of mildly suffocating the animal with their own eagerness. It starts right from the onset, with the band's two best songs in four years. Punctuated by a thick background forest of four violins, two violas, two cellos, and four brass players, the stomping "Blue Room at Archway" soars celestial-bound on a hook so clean, and a vocal so effortless, it screams the "pop" they're so roundly loved for but have been neglecting. The 12 strings 'n' horns folks stay on for "The Old Newsstand at Hamilton Square," their dulcet and jazzy tones slotting perfectly with the band's supple, firm playing on another hands down winner. (They're a knockout on "JIMMY WEBB is God" too.) Ahh, reverie. And so it goes from there. It's as if Carr was a hot-streak gold miner who emptied out his strike, briefly tapped out, and then suddenly-presto!-hit on a vein as bountiful as his previous (Boo) run. Some of the golden nuggets hit stride running, such as the whimsical but lovely "High as Monkeys" and "Comb Your Hair"; others, such as the flute and keyboards soaked "Monuments For a Dead City," take their damn sweet time fermenting. Singing along with the chorus of "Adieu Clo Clo" is likewise compulsory. No Boos LP is 100% perfect: "Free Huey" is about as awful a choice for a single (why!!!???) as can be conceived. Boo! indeed. Not because it's a spastic, hard-dance tune, but because it's a well-below average one that underachieves like, say, "Ride the Tiger." Massive Attack is not nervous. That and a few of the more slow, psychedelic numbers in the middle can be a little numbing. Other than that, the Boos are still too fresh-faced on the outside, and too full of complexity and depth in the inside, not to reclaim their spot as one of the great bands going. Welcome back, boys, glad your march towards oblivion back home was such a short one, because your prospects here suddenly seem so dim. Spend the bucks, buy the import! © Jack Rabid /TiVo
From
CD€14.49

People Move On

Bernard Butler

Classical - Released April 14, 1998 | Creation Records

Bernard Butler's stormy departure from Suede in 1994 smacked of celebrity self-indulgence. After all, he seemed to be leaving a good thing--Suede's future couldn't have looked brighter, and he already appeared to have a huge degree of creative control. So what did he want, to sing, too? After a few years of jumping from one celebrity project to another (as if he needed further Johnny Marr comparisons), Butler decided to go it alone with PEOPLE MOVE ON. That's where the speculation ends. PEOPLE MOVE ON is a masterful debut, highlighted by the youthful swagger of Butler's voice. Opening with the slow bombastic groove of "Woman I Know," he proceeds to fill the space with beautiful noise of every stripe. With a few exceptions (including an appearance by celeb chum Edwyn Collins), Butler wrote, played and produced all of PEOPLE MOVE ON. Aside from the boatload of big, enviable electric guitar riffs, Butler shows an adeptness on the acoustic, hinted at in Suede ("The Living Dead") and fully realized here, notably on "You Light The Fire," a beautiful ballad of vocals and fingerpicked guitar. © TiVo
From
CD€14.49

People Move On

Bernard Butler

Pop/Rock - Released April 14, 1998 | Creation Records

Bernard Butler's stormy departure from Suede in 1994 smacked of celebrity self-indulgence. After all, he seemed to be leaving a good thing--Suede's future couldn't have looked brighter, and he already appeared to have a huge degree of creative control. So what did he want, to sing, too? After a few years of jumping from one celebrity project to another (as if he needed further Johnny Marr comparisons), Butler decided to go it alone with PEOPLE MOVE ON. That's where the speculation ends. PEOPLE MOVE ON is a masterful debut, highlighted by the youthful swagger of Butler's voice. Opening with the slow bombastic groove of "Woman I Know," he proceeds to fill the space with beautiful noise of every stripe. With a few exceptions (including an appearance by celeb chum Edwyn Collins), Butler wrote, played and produced all of PEOPLE MOVE ON. Aside from the boatload of big, enviable electric guitar riffs, Butler shows an adeptness on the acoustic, hinted at in Suede ("The Living Dead") and fully realized here, notably on "You Light The Fire," a beautiful ballad of vocals and fingerpicked guitar. © TiVo
From
CD€11.49

Vanishing Point (Expanded Edition)

Primal Scream

Alternative & Indie - Released December 2, 1997 | Creation Records

From
CD€14.49

The Apple Bed

Nick Heyward

Pop/Rock - Released November 27, 1997 | Creation Records

From
CD€14.49

Hurricane #1

Hurricane #1

Pop - Released October 28, 1997 | Creation Records

Instead of pursuing Ride's shimmering waves of guitar distortion, Andy Bell decided to go Britpop with Hurricane #1. In other words, Hurricane #1's eponymous debut sounds a bit like Oasis, only with a fondness for Madchester rhythms, trancy interludes and extended jams. When the group does pull it all together, they can sound monstrous -- "Let Go of the Dream" and "Stand in Line" have powerful psychedelic overtones, and the jangly "Strange Meeting" is charming. However, too much of Hurricane #1 finds the group struggling with Noelrock, and while it's clear that the band simply doesn't have the brash hooks or intoxicating arrogance of the Gallaghers, they keep fighting ahead. Only when the group opens up toward the end, letting their own blend of trad-rock and psychedelic space-rock come forward, do Hurricane #1 sound like a storm. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo