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Alternative & Indie - Released September 30, 2008 | Craft Recordings

Bayside scored with 2007’s THE WALKING WOUNDED, but rather than resting on their laurels, they’re charging out of the gate with the vigorous, anthemic SHUDDER. David Schiffman’s production is streamlined and glossy, highlighting the band’s eminently hummable choruses and unassuming schoolboy tenderness. “Have Fun Storming the Castle” should storm the airways with its sugar-high, buzz-saw sound (and warm harmonies), and the melodic, Bad Religion-esque “Roshambo” simultaneously pushes the pop and punk elements of Bayside’s sound even further. © TiVo
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 30, 2008 | Craft Recordings

Showing an admirable lack of concern about flooding the market, Bayside have put out both their new studio album, SHUDDER, and this crisply played and recorded LIVE AT THE BAYSIDE SOCIAL CLUB on the same day. The show, played at New York’s SIR Studios before lucky members of the “Bayside Social Club” (the band’s official fan club), is composed of 13 tracks from all over Bayside’s discography. “They’re Not Horses They’re Unicorns,” from THE WALKING WOUNDED is heralded by grandiose strings, and older favorites like BAYSIDE’S “Don’t Call Me Peanut” and “Hello Shitty” are given committed, crowd-pleasing performances. © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released July 22, 2008 | Craft Recordings

CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 23, 2005 | Craft Recordings

Coming quickly on the heels of 2004's Sirens and Condolences, the men of Long Island's Bayside continue to find themselves pegged as an emo band, but the Anthony Raneri-steered group has a less limiting grasp on indie rock. While the explosive hard-charging opener "Hello Shitty" is a ferocious exclamation mark, the song is an anomaly amid the white noise acoustic rock of "Don't Call Me Peanut" and the optimistic tack of "Tortures of the Damned." Bayside's enthusiastic drive propels "Half a Life," which is one of several exhibitions for the wares of guitarist Jack O'Shea. If the complexities of relationships seem like trite song fodder these days, "Existing in a Crisis" proves that it can still be done with effect, but Raneri and his compadres still come up short on "Montauk," an experimental tune inspired by the erratic film Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Just the same, they deserve credit for trying to reach beyond their comfort zone. © John D. Luerssen /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 27, 2004 | Craft Recordings

Following in Thursday's footsteps, Long Island's Bayside breaks the typecasting of most Victory Records bands by brewing up a palatable batch of aggressive, melodic emo rock that draws on both Jawbox and the Alkaline Trio. Launched with "Masterpiece," which doesn't exactly live up to its title but is really good just the same, frontman Anthony juxtaposes hangovers and heartbreak before the quartet descends into the raw "Poison in My Veins," which also works the lovelorn angle with the finest harmony vocals this side of Midtown. While Bayside's lyrical approach fails to cover any new ground, the group is forceful and adept, whether it's creating a thunderous twin guitar roar on "Alcohol and Altar Boys" or conjuring up poppy, Promise Ring-like numbers like "A Synonym for Acquiesce." While the melodrama gets to be overbearing here and there, it's masked in the bombast of hard, driving tunes like "Kellum." Meanwhile, the quirky somberness of "If You're Bored" might be the most entertaining track of the pack, making Sirens and Condolences a pretty impressive entry. © John D. Luerssen /TiVo