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Alternative & Indie - Released February 5, 2021 | Atlantic Records UK

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Since the Staves' last album in 2017, the three sisters—Jessica, Emily and Camilla Staveley-Taylor—have lived through heartache. They unexpectedly lost their greatest supporter, their mother, weeks after the death of their grandmother. Within a month of that, Camilla left a seemingly troubled five-year relationship and fled her adopted home in the US for her mother's empty house just north of London. It all came out in the songs, as did Emily's new turn as a mother. All that pain and tenderness and wonder is beautiful, and sometimes devastating. Lovely ballad "Sparks" absolutely captures both emotions. A song for their late mom, it's like a plea for practical magic: "I can hear your keys in the door/ I want to believe it" go the words, while the music builds to a place of jubilance. A heavy undertow of distortion and muscular drum rolls pull at the seams of "Careful Kid," while the sisters' sweet choir voices tread carefully: "All the kicks in the ribs, they can really make you weak/ And I'm coming back around from a five-year rebound." The seemingly cheery finger snaps and feather-light backing vocals of "Devotion" quickly give way to somber piano and sentiments like: "Your affliction isn't mine to hold, and/ How should I know how to?...Devotion be the death of me." Camilla has said that she wrote some songs while still in her relationship: "That's the most depressing thing in the world—that, in hindsight, your song is telling you to run." Throughout, there are sonic echoes of Laura Marling, Angel Olsen and Haim, and spiritual echoes of Fiona Apple. Raised on Dylan and CSNY, the trio can pull off flawless folk harmonies (stripped-down "Nothing's Gonna Happen" is especially a knock-out in that department) but there's nothing retro or twee about their style. And just as notable as all the turmoil embedded in the lyrics is an eager determination to come through it alive. "Trying" is almost gothic in its haunted simplicity, the sisters singing "I'm all scared/ 'Cause it's been so rough/ I'll be here/ Trying" before rising into a chant of "I'm sorry, you should be sorry, too." Camilla has said that the Haim-like title track is about not letting yourself be belittled through someone else's eyes. "I'm a good woman," it swears, as much of a declaration for the one saying it as who she's saying it to. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 20, 2014 | Atlantic Records UK

The Staves, a folk-influenced U.K. trio featuring sisters Emily, Jessica, and Camila Staveley-Taylor, made waves with their debut album, 2012's Dead & Born & Grown & Live, which put the emphasis on the siblings' vocals, both individually and in harmony, as they performed with spare acoustic arrangements. For their second full-length effort, 2015's If I Was, the Staves have taken a somewhat different approach; with Justin Vernon of Bon Iver producing, the sophomore album keeps one foot in contemporary folk while introducing elements of Americana and soft rock into their formula, all the while highlighting the sisters' clear and emotionally powerful singing. If I Was is an album that expands the Staves' musical range without smothering the qualities that make them so memorable, and it's a step forward that brings out the best in the trio. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 19, 2013 | Atlantic Records UK

Dead & Born & Grown, the debut album from Watford, England-based sisters Emily, Jessica, and Camilla Staveley-Taylor, arrives on the heels of their well-received EPs Mexico and The Motherlode. The trio's first full-length outing, which was produced by Glyn and Ethan Johns and includes material from both of the aforementioned EPs, pairs the evocative British folk of Laura Marling and Sandy Denny with the rustic Americana of the Wailin' Jennys and Gillian Welch. Dead & Born & Grown leans harder on the latter, and if the siblings’ measured yet undeniably English phrasing weren’t so apparent, it would be easy to mistake them for Gram Parsons/Joni Mitchell-loving, Laurel Canyon songbirds instead of pub-bred, early-twentysomething lasses from the home counties. Opener "Wisely & Slow" sets the table with a nearly two-minute, a cappella intro that shows off the siblings' considerable pipes. What follows is a relatively calm, collected, and breezy set of 21st century folk songs that prefers subtlety over novelty; the leaf-strewn, babbling brook to Mumford & Sons' relentlessly stormy ocean. Clear, confident, and classy, the Staves (along with their producers) know that their ability to harmonize (or just sing in perfect, familial unison) is their calling card, and the instrumentation is calibrated according to that knowledge, allowing their vocals to sit fairly high in the mix, which gives stand-out cuts like "Winter Trees," "The Motherlode," and the lovely, and surprisingly timeless-sounding title track, a genuine warmth, as well as an air of real intimacy that stands in stark contrast to many of their contemporaries. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 20, 2020 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 24, 2017 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 23, 2018 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 7, 2020 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 6, 2019 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2015 | Atlantic Records UK

The Staves, a folk-influenced U.K. trio featuring sisters Emily, Jessica, and Camila Staveley-Taylor, made waves with their debut album, 2012's Dead & Born & Grown & Live, which put the emphasis on the siblings' vocals, both individually and in harmony, as they performed with spare acoustic arrangements. For their second full-length effort, 2015's If I Was, the Staves have taken a somewhat different approach; with Justin Vernon of Bon Iver producing, the sophomore album keeps one foot in contemporary folk while introducing elements of Americana and soft rock into their formula, all the while highlighting the sisters' clear and emotionally powerful singing. If I Was is an album that expands the Staves' musical range without smothering the qualities that make them so memorable, and it's a step forward that brings out the best in the trio. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 5, 2018 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 27, 2021 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 12, 2012 | Atlantic Records UK

Dead & Born & Grown, the debut album from Watford, England-based sisters Emily, Jessica, and Camilla Staveley-Taylor, arrives on the heels of their well-received EPs Mexico and The Motherlode. The trio's first full-length outing, which was produced by Glyn and Ethan Johns and includes material from both of the aforementioned EPs, pairs the evocative British folk of Laura Marling and Sandy Denny with the rustic Americana of the Wailin' Jennys and Gillian Welch. Dead & Born & Grown leans harder on the latter, and if the siblings’ measured yet undeniably English phrasing weren’t so apparent, it would be easy to mistake them for Gram Parsons/Joni Mitchell-loving, Laurel Canyon songbirds instead of pub-bred, early-twentysomething lasses from the home counties. Opener "Wisely & Slow" sets the table with a nearly two-minute, a cappella intro that shows off the siblings' considerable pipes. What follows is a relatively calm, collected, and breezy set of 21st century folk songs that prefers subtlety over novelty; the leaf-strewn, babbling brook to Mumford & Sons' relentlessly stormy ocean. Clear, confident, and classy, the Staves (along with their producers) know that their ability to harmonize (or just sing in perfect, familial unison) is their calling card, and the instrumentation is calibrated according to that knowledge, allowing their vocals to sit fairly high in the mix, which gives stand-out cuts like "Winter Trees," "The Motherlode," and the lovely, and surprisingly timeless-sounding title track, a genuine warmth, as well as an air of real intimacy that stands in stark contrast to many of their contemporaries. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 23, 2018 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 21, 2021 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 10, 2020 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 2, 2011 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 3, 2020 | Atlantic Records UK

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 24, 2017 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 13, 2016 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 10, 2017 | Atlantic Records UK