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Alternative & Indie - Released January 29, 2021 | Virgin Music UK LAS (P&D)

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Rock - Released August 18, 2017 | SW Records

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A worthy heir to the spirit of Pink Floyd and a major figure of contemporary progressive rock, Steven Wilson managed to rekindle the flame of a genre worshipped by some and loathed by others… The former Porcupine Tree’s strength is his ability to inject a kind of pop spirit into his viscerally progressive compositions. And while his songs overflow with ripped solos, his bittersweet melodies remain very addictive. This is once again the case in To The Bone, the fifth studio album of the British musician. An extremely personal album, as Wilson himself explains he took inspiration from the bedside records of his childhood, in particular Peter Gabriel’s So, Kate Bush’s Hounds Of Love, Talk Talk’s The Colour Of Spring and Tears For Fears’ The Seeds Of Love. These references from the 1980s give a retro vibe to this impeccably produced album, which features XTC’s Andy Partridge, among others. You’ll come out of To The Bone with the feeling of having completed a beautiful trip back in time. A journey with plain influences wonderfully integrated by a musician equally talented for writing and producing. Enough to break the barriers of the rather reductive mold of progressive music. © CM/Qobuz
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Rock - Released November 2, 2018 | Mercury Studios

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The legendary Royal Albert Hall is the London counterpart of Paris’ Palais Garnier or Olympia. The venue is an ideal setting for the raw diamond that is Steven Wilson’s music. Wilson has harmoniously integrated a high-flying pop component into his ever unique and genuine approach. This new album is a bit different, something that Wilson wholeheartedly accepts (unlike numerous other artists). For To the Bone he is backed up by his devoted band. It’s a band that deserves special attention, even if Steven has decided not to hide behind a heavy and somewhat misleading shield anymore, like he did with the Porcupine Tree. In this regard, there could hardly be someone more subtle and respectable than Adam Holzman on keyboards. Holzman has worked with his Majesty Miles Davis − most notably on Tutu in 1986, and the subsequent tours for the next three years – as well as Michel Petrucciani, Marcus Miller, Robben Ford, and tens of others. Steven isn’t even the first Wilson he’s worked with, as he’s accompanied by Ray, former singer of Stiltskin (known for their hit Inside) and Genesis. Another member of the team is guitarist Alex Hutchings. Hutchings is less known than the others but performed in Thriller Live, the enormous spectacle in tribute to Michael Jackson, and despite the daunting task of following in the footsteps of Dave Kilminster and Guthrie Govan he passes with flying colours. Drummer Craig Blundell (Pendragon, Porcupine Tree…) also successfully replaces the amazing Marco Minnemann and Chad Wackerman…Another seems to have risen in prominence and been an influence on Steven Wilson’s recent musical orientation: the impressively talented bassist Nick Beggs (Ellis, Beggs & Howard, The Mute Gods, Steve Hackett, and… Kajagoogoo). And of course let’s not forget the amazing Ninet Tayeb on Pariah, People Who Eat Darkness and Blank Tapes. With such support throughout the 2 hours and 26 minutes of this live performance Wilson can only spread his wings and even be a little audacious by introducing the most pop track of TTB: Permanating. This track is more than just lyrics; he proclaims his love for the Beatles and ABBA, even if it means offending “music snobs”, and invites his audience to “dance on a little disco and pop”… Wilson takes six Porcupine Tree tracks and two titles from his dark and depressive side (as he admits) − The Sound of Muzak and the eminently gloomy The Raven That Refused to Sing – to close this live album and remarkable display of power. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Progressive Rock - Released March 2, 2015 | Kscope

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 7, 2020 | Virgin Music UK LAS (P&D)

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Progressive Rock - Released February 25, 2013 | Kscope

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Rock - Released November 20, 2008 | Kscope

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Rock - Released September 16, 2016 | Kscope

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Progressive Rock - Released March 2, 2015 | Kscope

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Progressive Rock - Released September 27, 2011 | Kscope

Progressive Rock - Released February 25, 2013 | Kscope

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Rock - Released June 30, 2014 | Kscope

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Progressive Rock - Released January 22, 2016 | Kscope

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 1, 2017 | SW Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 29, 2021 | Virgin Music UK LAS (P&D)

Steven Wilson fans have been primed for The Future Bites since he released To the Bone in 2017. That record, and the subsequent 4½ EP, were deliberately "pop" responses to his three-album dalliance with prog -- Raven That Refused to Sing, Hand. Cannot. Erase, and Grace for Drowning. In contrast to the above, The Future Bites is a slick exercise in Wilson's oft-articulated love of synth pop and electronic music. It's a loose concept set about the treachery that rampant consumerism foists upon the world, and the danger a technological society imposes on personal identity. Given the musical m.o. here, it should come as no surprise that the production on these nine songs is slick, even icy. It contrasts sharply with most of Wilson's songwriting that remains saturated in welcoming, effusive melodies and hooks. On most tracks, guitars and drums are subservient to keyboards and electronic rhythms and soundscapes. As usual, the studio cast is stellar. It includes keyboardists Adam Holzman and Richard Barbieri, bassist Nick Beggs, drummer Michael Spearman, sonic architect and beat maestro Faultline (David Kosten), and backing vocalists Wendy Harriott, Bobbie Gordon, and Crystal Williams. Set highlights include "King Ghost," which eschews conventional instrumentation in favor of dark, brooding, quasi-futurist electronics. They simultaneously reflect, "Memorabilia"-era Soft Cell, middle period Talk Talk, and Oil & Gold-era Shriekback. That said, the song's subtle, airy melody is infectious, nearly hummable above the layered electronics. "12 Things I Forgot" is the most formally constructed pop song here. It's framed by conventional guitars, organic drums, basses, and Rhodes piano, and glorious backing vocals from the Mystery Jets. The hooky melody walks a strange and circuitous path between vintage Todd Rundgren, early Aztec Camera, and Difford & Tilbrook. Weirdly, it contains a tagline hook straight out of Peter Frampton's "I Want You (To Show Me the Way)." "Eminent Sleaze" delivers a sinister muscular beat driven by a bass-and-drum vamp that eerily recalls Dr. John's "I Walk on Gilded Splinters" atop a spooky string chart and exponentially layered synthetic handclaps. Wilson adds a wonky Adrian Belew-esque guitar break, propelled by Beggs' nasty Chapman Stick and Holzman's restrained keys. The electro-disco of "Personal Shopper" channels Human League, Kraftwerk, and Giorgio Moroder. Its lyric is drenched in irony as Elton John reads from a shopping list of "shit you never knew you liked," including "deluxe box sets" (a piss take, both men are guilty of releasing them). "Man of the People" is a lovely, alienated, bittersweet ballad adorned by Barbieri's heavenly soundscape as guitars, pillowy beats, and atmospherics frame Wilson's lovely faux-soul vocal. In sum, those who had trouble with To the Bone, Wilson's well-executed homage to the progressive pop of Kate Bush, Tears for Fears, and Peter Gabriel, may have even more with this. Most fans, however, especially more recent ones, shouldn't find The Future Bites an inconsistent entry in Wilson's catalog, but an arguably minor one that steps sideways instead of forward. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released September 27, 2011 | Kscope

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Rock - Released October 14, 2016 | Kscope

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Rock - Released August 18, 2017 | SW Records

Restlessness has been a defining characteristic of Steven Wilson's musical career. One need only consider his many projects as evidence: No-Man with Tim Bowness, Blackfield with Aviv Geffen, Porcupine Tree, Bass Communion, and I.E.M., and his four earlier prog/pop solo projects, Raven That Refused to Sing, Hand. Cannot. Erase, Grace for Drowning, and Insurgentes. He even whet punters' appetites for To the Bone by reissuing his cover singles as an album, and 4 1/2 to reveal the more accessible side of his songwriting. To the Bone's press materials describe it as Wilson's "...hat-tip to the hugely ambitious progressive pop records of his youth...." Sources cited are Peter Gabriel, Tears for Fears, Kate Bush, etc. One can hear their traces, especially David Bowie's. This is the most "song"-oriented record in Wilson's catalog. Each tune could have been recorded in a vacuum. Wilson includes members of his road band and others, and features Israeli singer Ninet Tayeb -- who nearly steals the show on several tracks. On the stellar title opening cut -- complete with Pink Floyd-esque guitars (à la "Time") Tayeb's and Dave Kilminster's backing vocals buoy the tune's hook, and add operatic support to Wilson's lead. On "Pariah," Tayeb alternates lead vocals with Wilson. The lithe harmonic architecture with lilting synths, restrained guitars, and loops creates a backdrop for his vulnerable delivery, yet her refrain resonates with emotional authority and encouragement for the protagonist's doubt. It echoes the interplay of Gabriel and Bush on "Don't Give Up" and is just as distinctive. "Refuge" takes a couple of minutes to emerge from its (mostly) electronic intro, but when it does, its sultry melody is supported by a trilling string section and thundering tom-toms, squalling harmonica and power chords to become an anthem. Speaking of which, the utterly infectious "Permanenting" with its hooky melody (again with Tayeb's backing vocals adding heft and sincerity) nods directly at Tears for Fears' glorious harmonies while simultaneously reflecting a love of Northern soul (à la Curtis Mayfield's "Get on Up"), though its urgent guitars and popping drums are pure Wilson. "People Eat Darkness" is a fist-pumping rocker that sounds like Bowie fronting Swervedriver. Wilson nods at the post-trip-hop sounds of No-Man with "Song of I," with its loops and handclaps atop piano and strings. Its vocals are delivered in duet with Sophie Hunger. The nine-minute "Detonation" weds prog to adventurous pop with a glorious result, while closer "Song to Unborn" (featuring only his road band) is majestic; it could easily sit with the songs on either Raven or Hand. While To the Bone sometimes seems inconsistent, it's an illusion; repeated listening reveals that Wilson's brand of progressive pop is so multivalently textured and expertly crafted that its aesthetic and sonic palette refuse to be contained under a single rock umbrella. As such, To the Bone stands with Wilson's best work. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Progressive Rock - Released March 2, 2015 | Kscope

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Progressive Rock - Released September 21, 2012 | Kscope