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Classical - Released November 22, 2010 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année
The highly personal and often chimerical piano music of Robert Schumann requires a confident interpreter who can enter the music with full awareness of the composer's quirks, yet not become so involved with their strangeness that he gets lost. For this Virgin release, the brilliant Piotr Anderszewski has chosen two works that show the extremes of Schumann's divided personality: the youthful and playful Humoresque, Op. 20, and the late, madness-tinged Morning Songs, Op. 133. In between them is the sober set of Studies for the Pedal Piano, Op. 56, which, in its serious counterpoint and controlled expressions, stands apart from Schumann's wild mood swings and emotionally turbulent music. Because these three works are seldom performed and are open to fresh possibilities, Anderszewski has free reign to explore the whimsy and sorrow of the Humoresque, the intellectuality of the Studies, and the brooding of the Morning Songs, and the range of his comprehension and expression is wide indeed. To understand Schumann's personality certainly requires exposure to much more than a single CD of his keyboard pieces, no matter how well played, but if one needed an album to encapsulate the composer's musical life in soul-stirring performances, Anderszewski's disc would be an excellent resource. © TiVo
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Keyboard Concertos - Released January 26, 2018 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik
Among the hundreds of recordings of late Mozart piano concertos on the market, including many of this particular pairing, this one of Poland's Piotr Anderszewski at the keyboard and conducting the Chamber Orchestra of Europe is a major standout. Though played on a modern piano, it brings together several trends that have lately been explored in historical-performance recordings, and the result, especially in the Piano Concerto No. 25 in C major, K. 503, is a vast canvas teeming with details, perfectly controlled. Anderszewski applies interpretive freedom to the piano part without breaking the boundaries of the style: sample the finale of the C major concerto, where the pairs of chords that end the phrases of piano passagework are treated slightly differently each time. He leads the Chamber Orchestra of Europe from the piano, and here he really excels, catching the huge strides in orchestration Mozart made in this work and giving it almost the flavor of Weber. His piano work is brilliant and arresting, but he gives full space to the orchestra's wind players, and the whole has a chamber flavor (something he has said he was aiming for) despite its vast scope and despite the fact that this is not a small-group performance. The Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat major, K. 595, is also very strong, given the same kind of liveliness and made very tuneful, rightfully avoiding the usual autumnal quality (Mozart wasn't planning on dying when he wrote this work). A richly detailed, precise, and exciting treatment of the most difficult of all the Mozart piano concertos, and a fine entry in what is apparently becoming an ongoing series from Anderszewski. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 31, 2014 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month
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Classical - Released January 29, 2021 | Warner Classics

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There is no hint of historically oriented performance here as pianist Piotr Anderszewski performs pieces, half of them to be exact from Book II of Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 870-893, in a way that apparently no other keyboardist, modern or historical, has ever done. There are various surprises in Anderszewski's interpretation, but the big one is that he departs from Bach's published order. He is straightforward about what he is doing, asserting in the notes that "it seems to me that [the published order] is not one in which the pieces follow each other with an emotional, musical inevitability." Anderszewski supplies his own ordering, which leaves the C major prelude and fugue (but not the C minor) at the beginning and the B major and minor pieces at the end. In between are pairs in fourth- and third-related keys, building toward a somberly slow Fugue in G sharp minor. The idea makes sense on its own terms, and Anderszewski could cite in his favor that some of these pieces were probably written much earlier than others and were roped by Bach into the final set; he didn't sit down and write them out in sequence. Anderszewski's execution is both rigorous and attractive. He perceives the works as "character pieces" and "realised the particular importance of giving each theme of each fugue a specific character." These are carried through the fugues with impressive consistency and control. Throughout, Anderszewski keeps his piano to chamber dimensions, and the variety with the overall quiet dynamic levels becomes quite absorbing. The downside is that although Bach reworked his compositions in many ways, he never did so in anything like this way, and, with a composer as systematically minded as Bach, one hesitates to fool with basic structures. Taken on its terms, however, Anderszewski's performance succeeds. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 7, 2002 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released August 15, 2007 | harmonia mundi

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Classical - Released January 13, 2017 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released October 31, 2014 | Warner Classics

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Polish pianist Piotr Anderszewski has attracted a strong following for his Bach performances, which are now appearing on recordings and are well worth listeners' time. Anderszewski falls well over on the subjective side of the Bach interpretation spectrum, and for those who dislike the kind of recording in which the player is leading listeners through a work rather than letting them examine it, this might not be a good choice. Still less is this for those inclined toward historical performance; Anderszewski's playing is intensely pianistic. This said, he doesn't stomp on the pedals; he uses articulation and dynamic contrasts, often between the hands, more than the pedal as a means of expression. Anderszewski is after the intricacies of Bach's music: he shapes the melodies in great detail, and he is keen to clarify the contrapuntal structure of these suites, often in startling detail. The beauty of his readings resides in hearing a tiny ornament in a left-hand line and realizing that it has great structural significance. For those who don't buy his conception of the piece, his playing could seem mannered, but it would be tough to argue that it is not worked out in truly impressive detail, and in the finales he has moments of Gouldian inspiration. The so-called English Suites, in fact, are ideally suited to Anderszewski's style: he explicates the deep contrapuntal thinking embedded at a profound level in these ostensible pieces of dance music. Strongly recommended for those in the pianistic Bach camp. © TiVo
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Classical - Released June 18, 2007 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released June 18, 2007 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released May 8, 2009 | Warner Classics

One might wonder if at such an early point in his career Polish-Hungarian pianist Piotr Anderszewski deserves having an entire Carnegie Hall recital recorded and released as a two-disc set. The proof is his performance, which triumphantly vindicates Virgin's decision. Not only does Anderszewski play his varied yet cogent program with supreme virtuosity, he interprets it with sublime artistry. As in his previous studio recordings, Anderszewski's tone is crisp, bright, and richly colored, and his technique is clean, strong, and subtly nuanced. As impressive as his playing was in his earlier studio recordings, it is staggering here. His speed and accuracy in the Finale of Schumann's Faschingsschwank aus Wien rival Richter's and Michelangeli's, and the clarity and lucidity of his playing of the Fuga from Beethoven's Opus 110 Sonata match Brendel's and Pollini's. Anderszewski's interpretations go deep, finding lyrical raptures in the sonorous Sarabande from Bach's Partita, and dramatic ecstasies in Janácek's In the Mists' jagged Andantino that are as emotionally thrilling as they are aesthetically exciting. As a snapshot of one of the great living pianists, this two-disc set is well worth hearing, especially in Virgin's amazingly vivid and astoundingly intimate live sound. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 8, 2021 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released February 6, 2006 | Warner Classics

Polish pianist Piotr Anderszewski first came to international attention in 1995 with his Philips' recording with violinist Viktoria Mullova of violin sonatas by Janácek, Debussy, and Prokofiev. The combination of Mullova's fire and passion with Anderszewski light and power was incandescent, and their 1997 follow-up disc of Brahms' violin sonatas blazed just as radiantly. Anderszewski made his solo recording debut in 2000 on Virgin with a masterful performance of Beethoven's "Diabelli" Variations and followed that in 2002 with a terrific disc of Mozart's Piano Concertos No. 21 and No. 24. After impressive discs devoted to Bach and Chopin and a stunning recital coupling Bach, Beethoven, and Webern, Anderszewski returned to Mozart in 2006 with this disc of his Piano Concertos No. 17 and No. 20. As before, Anderszewski is not only playing but directing the orchestra, albeit here the orchestra is not the somewhat slack Sinfonia Varsovia, but the always refined Scottish Chamber Orchestra. As before, Anderszewski's performances are terrific. In the Concerto No. 20 in D minor, his playing is hot-blooded but subtle, powerfully expressive but objective, thrillingly virtuosic but completely controlled. In the Concerto No. 17 in G major, his playing is highly polished but intense, lightly witty but deep, elegantly beautiful but thoroughly thought-through. As always, Anderszewski's tone is nuanced and his technique is invincible. Virgin's sound is full and rich. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 26, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet
Among the hundreds of recordings of late Mozart piano concertos on the market, including many of this particular pairing, this one of Poland's Piotr Anderszewski at the keyboard and conducting the Chamber Orchestra of Europe is a major standout. Though played on a modern piano, it brings together several trends that have lately been explored in historical-performance recordings, and the result, especially in the Piano Concerto No. 25 in C major, K. 503, is a vast canvas teeming with details, perfectly controlled. Anderszewski applies interpretive freedom to the piano part without breaking the boundaries of the style: sample the finale of the C major concerto, where the pairs of chords that end the phrases of piano passagework are treated slightly differently each time. He leads the Chamber Orchestra of Europe from the piano, and here he really excels, catching the huge strides in orchestration Mozart made in this work and giving it almost the flavor of Weber. His piano work is brilliant and arresting, but he gives full space to the orchestra's wind players, and the whole has a chamber flavor (something he has said he was aiming for) despite its vast scope and despite the fact that this is not a small-group performance. The Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat major, K. 595, is also very strong, given the same kind of liveliness and made very tuneful, rightfully avoiding the usual autumnal quality (Mozart wasn't planning on dying when he wrote this work). A richly detailed, precise, and exciting treatment of the most difficult of all the Mozart piano concertos, and a fine entry in what is apparently becoming an ongoing series from Anderszewski. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 1, 2002 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released December 18, 2020 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 13, 2017 | Warner Classics

Booklet
Only two of the four works on this release by Piotr Anderszewski are actually designated as fantasies, but the mercurial Polish pianist has an original premise here: it is the idea of the fantasy rather than the genre as such that is explored. For Mozart and Schumann, Anderszewski writes, "the cruel resistance of the blank page feels nonexistent, disregarded. And therein lies for me an important, precious connection between Mozart and Schumann: an unobstructed directness to their music, in which the purity of intention remains intact." There's certainly room to debate that statement in the abstract, but the fact is that here it makes for a novel and persuasively coherent recital. Anderszewski begins with the Mozart Fantasy in C minor, K. 475, in an unusually seductive, murky mood. This work is often joined to the Piano Sonata in C minor, K. 457, but Anderszewski makes an especially close tie here, beginning without a pause and seemingly letting the fantasy seep into his reading of the sonata. The Schumann Fantasy in C major, Op. 17, receives a fine, poetic reading. The program closes with an unusual item, the so-called Geistervariationen or Ghost Variations in E flat major, WoO 24, Schumann's last work, which he began before he threw himself into the Rhine River and completed afterward, in the asylum. The work has never been very popular, but has exerted a fascination on various musicians including Tori Amos, who quoted it in "Your Ghost." Anderszewski makes a strong case for it here, creating an atmosphere in which music seems to be swirling in the composer's head; the theme-and-variations form might seem antithetical to the "fantasy" idea, but Anderszewski draws a strong connection. A fine piece of pure Romantic pianism. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 30, 2007 | Warner Classics

Piotr Anderszewski has finally been able to record some of the music of Karol Szymanowski, and it has been worth the wait. This is a brilliant performance of music that is rich in so many ways and that deserves a wider audience outside of the composer's homeland. The three works here were written between 1915 and 1917 and, therefore, share many qualities. The two triptychs, Masques and Métopes, reflect Szymanowski's encounter with the music of Ravel. They are atmospheric and harmonically colorful, but go beyond Ravel in their use of multiple, simultaneous tonalities. What frequently marks this music is the idea of "two": distinct, but related moods, keys, articulations, themes, and so on. are set against each other. In Masque No. 2, "Tantris le bouffon," it is the clown vs. the desperate lover; in the first Métope, "L'île des sirènes," it is long waves of notes vs. short trilling remarks. Those types of contrast exist even in the much more formally constructed Sonata No. 3. Anderszewski makes the differences very clear, giving the music a focus and intensity that is almost tangible. In his hands, this Impressionistic music is like a vivid dream that seems too real to have been only a dream. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 27, 2020 | Warner Classics

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