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Classical - Released January 1, 1981 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released March 26, 2013 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 1996 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Every man's death diminishes us all, but the death of a man so close to completing his greatest achievement and the summation of his life's work diminishes us all greatly -- very, very greatly. When Emil Gilels died in 1985, he had completed recordings of most but not all of Beethoven's piano sonatas, released here in a nine-disc set. What's here is unimaginably good: superlative recordings of 27 of the 32 canonical sonatas, including the "Pathétique," "Moonlight," "Waldstein," "Appassionata," "Les Adieux," and the majestic "Hammerklavier," plus the two early "Electoral" Sonatas and the mighty Eroica Variations. What's missing is unimaginably priceless: five of the canonical sonatas, including the first and -- horror vacui -- the last. But still, for what there is, we must be grateful. Beyond all argument one of the great pianists of the twentieth century, Gilels the Soviet super virtuoso had slowly mellowed and ripened over his long career, and when he began recording the sonatas in 1972, his interpretations had matured and deepened while his superlative technique remained gloriously intact straight through to the last recordings of his final year. In performance after performance, one marvels at Gilels' virtuosity, his expressivity, and his sheer joy in music-making. But most of all, it is through the intensity of Gilels' interpretations, in the way he finds the depths of the Largos and reaches the heights of the Allegro vivaces, in the way he seems to so thoroughly understand and completely identify with Beethoven's music, that we understand it in a new and better way ourselves. While obviously not the only Beethoven piano sonata set one should have on the shelf, any Beethoven collection without Gilels is a poorer Beethoven collection. From high stereo to early digital, Deutsche Grammophon's sound is consistently translucent. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1986 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1970 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released August 1, 2005 | Warner Classics

Way back during the Cold War, it was always devastating to the prestige of the West when the USSR would let one of its artists out of the country. These days, we can no longer imagine what it must have been like when a closed and repressive society sent one of its artists on tours outside the USSR. But in those days, for the West to discover that a closed and repressive society was capable not only of artistic achievement but of artistic achievements that surpassed anything the West had to offer was a sobering, indeed frightening proposition. How could the USSR turn out a pianist like Emil Gilels, a player with a superhuman technique and a very human soulfulness, a pianist with passionate intensity and ardent individualism? And since they could, what did this mean to the West, where superhuman technique seemed irrevocably fused with inhuman austerity, and passionate intensity seemed irreversibly tied to unrestrained individualism? Whatever it meant, there was no denying the reality of the situation. As these stupendous 1957 recordings of Beethoven's G major and E flat major piano concertos amply demonstrate, Gilels was a pianist whose commanding artistry and consummate virtuosity far exceeded any Western player's. Accompanied by Leopold Ludwig leading London's Philharmonia Orchestra, Gilels' vision of Beethoven as the embodiment of all that is heroic and humane in music is utterly compelling and easily as fine as the greatest recordings of either piece ever made. EMI's clean remastering of its own warm and deep stereo sound rivals the best recorded sound. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1998 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 18, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released November 13, 2020 | Alexandre Bak - Classical Music Reference Recording

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Classical - Released December 11, 2020 | Archipel

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Classical - Released January 10, 1966 | ISMCDigital

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Chamber Music - Released April 3, 2020 | The state51 Conspiracy

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Classical - Released January 1, 1961 | BnF Collection

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Classical - Released August 3, 2018 | Mangora Classical

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca (UMO)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1960 | BnF Collection

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Classical - Released January 1, 2021 | Russian Compact Disc

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Concertos - Released March 11, 2021 | JSC Mezhdunarodnaya Kniga Musica