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Classical - Released September 24, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

Hi-Res Booklet
There are nearly as many works by Beethoven without opus numbers (WoO) as there are scores 'officially' listed by the composer. Even if most of them do not change our perception of his genius, some represent milestones that would lead him to his own language, while others exploit much lesser known aspects of his creative work. This album presents Beethoven's very early works, which he never disowned, as he would write much later on a printed copy: "These sonatas and the Dressler variations are my first works".Indeed, the Dressler Variations, WoO 63 were composed in 1782 and published the same year by a publisher in Mannheim, then one of the greatest musical centres of Europe. It is astonishing to note Beethoven's lifelong devotion to the variation, a form he later carried to the point of perfection. Formerly called 'Sonatines', the three Prince-Elector sonatas, WoO 47  (in German, entitled 'Kurfüstensonaten') immediately follow this series of variations. Composed and published in 1783, as a child of thirteen years of age, they show his sound knowledge of the musicians of his time, in particular Bach’s sons, while at the same time introducing certain rhythmic and harmonic turns of phrase that he would continue to use throughout his life.Much less musically interesting, the Concerto in E flat major, WoO 4 probably dates from 1784, before Beethoven's first trip to Vienna, where he may have met Mozart. The first Beethoven orchestral work to be found, it remains incomplete since it is in fact a solo piano piece on which are written a few annotations concerning the orchestra's responses. Completed, it was published after Beethoven's death as part of his complete works published by Breitkopf & Härtel.The exuberant yet refined piano playing of the Chinese-Swiss pianist See Siang Wong wonderfully suits these youthful pages. This astonishing performer has another talent, one that allows him to create mouth-watering recipes on "Seesiang", his own culinary blog visited by many aficionados of Chinese gastronomy. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 10, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 27, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 27, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 27, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 27, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 27, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 27, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 27, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 27, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 6, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released August 6, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released June 23, 2021 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released November 25, 2020 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released May 15, 2020 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released March 22, 2019 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released April 27, 2018 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released March 20, 2012 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released March 20, 2012 | RCA Red Seal

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Classical - Released April 30, 2004 | RCA Red Seal

Over the past 100 years, there have been recordings of the complete Brahms' symphonies that rank with the greatest recordings of anything ever made. There are wonderful Weingartners, the fabulous Furtwänglers, the monumental Klemperers, the amazing Abbados...the list goes on and on. Of course, over the past 100 years, there have been recordings of Brahms symphonies that rank among the worst recordings of anything ever made. There are the obdurate Davalos, the superficial Karajans, and the uncomprehending Jarvis...again, the list goes on and on. Where in all this do the recordings of Brahms' symphonies by Colin Davis stack? Near but not at the top: Davis is a strong, intelligent, and sympathetic conductor whose Brahms' symphonies are clear, direct, and expressive. Davis keeps the tempos moving and the long line flowing and yet still finds moments of quiet repose amidst the high drama. The Bavarian Radio Symphony plays with power, precision, and a fair amount of passion. Gerhard Oppitz makes a fine protagonist in the Piano Concertos and Kyoko Takezawa makes a lyrical advocate in the Violin Concerto. RCA's digital sound is clear, rich, and deep. © TiVo