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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Concord Records

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Hot on the heels of session work with Miles Davis and his Kind of Blue-era group, alto saxophonist Cannonball Adderley recorded this excellent live date with his brother, cornetist Nat Adderley, along with pianist Bobby Timmons, bassist Sam Jones, and drummer Louis Hayes. The Cannonball Adderley Quintet in San Francisco defined the accessible, yet technically challenging, soul-jazz that Adderley would be associated with for the rest of his career. The warm, exuberant feel of the quintet is especially evident on the set's two finest tracks -- a spirited take on Randy Weston's "Hi-Fly," and on Timmons' swinging "This Here." Two of Adderley's own compositions, "Spontaneous Combustion" and "You Got It!," blend blazing post-bop dexterity with pulsing, infectious blues structures. Both Cannonball and Nat Adderley play with stunning, bluesy brilliance here, while the rhythm section ably anchors the proceedings. Outside of Somethin' Else, Adderley's 1958 masterpiece, In San Francisco may be the saxophonist's defining moment. © Anthony Tognazzini /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2000 | Blue Note Records

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Recorded in early 1960, Them Dirty Blues contains two classic jazz compositions: Nat Adderley's "Work Song" and Bobby Timmons' "Dat Dere," the sequel to "This Here." This was alto saxophonist Cannonball Adderley's second quintet with brother Nat Adderley (cornet), and features Bobby Timmons on piano (who plays on four tracks and was replaced by Barry Harris on the remaining five), Sam Jones on bass, and Louis Hayes on drums. Them Dirty Blues was originally released on Riverside until Adderley made the switch to Capitol where he brought several master tapes with him, including these sessions. © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1986 | Blue Note Records

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This is a fine all-around set from the Cannonball Adderley Quintet of 1960 with the altoist/leader, cornetist Nat Adderley, pianist Victor Feldman, bassist Sam Jones and drummer Louis Hayes. The fifth of seven LPs reissued by Orrin Keepnews and taken from Adderley's Riverside years finds his band in top form on the original version of "Sack O' Woe," a previously unissued "Our Delight," Jimmy Heath's "Big 'P'" and "Blue Daniel" among others. It's a strong introduction to the music of this classic hard bop group. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1993 | Fantasy Records

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Although the nine songs on this new Cannonball Adderley reissue were originally done live at concerts in Japan and San Francisco in 1963, they nevertheless make a nice tribute to departed jazz giant Dizzy Gillespie. The assembled group was among the finest Adderley ever led, with Yusef Lateef providing a dynamic, unpredictable third solo voice on flute, tenor sax, and oboe, contrasting with Cannonball's pungent alto sax and Nat Adderley's pithy cornet solos. Bassist Sam Jones and drummer Louis Hayes were a top-flight tandem, while Joe Zawinul was then playing bluesy, funky piano in his pre-synthesizer, Miles Davis/Weather Report phase. Everything is illustrative of a prime band enjoying some great nights. © Ron Wynn /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1960 | Riverside

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Hot on the heels of session work with Miles Davis and his Kind of Blue-era group, alto saxophonist Cannonball Adderley recorded this excellent live date with his brother, cornetist Nat Adderley, along with pianist Bobby Timmons, bassist Sam Jones, and drummer Louis Hayes. The Cannonball Adderley Quintet in San Francisco defined the accessible, yet technically challenging, soul-jazz that Adderley would be associated with for the rest of his career. The warm, exuberant feel of the quintet is especially evident on the set's two finest tracks -- a spirited take on Randy Weston's "Hi-Fly," and on Timmons' swinging "This Here." Two of Adderley's own compositions, "Spontaneous Combustion" and "You Got It!," blend blazing post-bop dexterity with pulsing, infectious blues structures. Both Cannonball and Nat Adderley play with stunning, bluesy brilliance here, while the rhythm section ably anchors the proceedings. Outside of Somethin' Else, Adderley's 1958 masterpiece, In San Francisco may be the saxophonist's defining moment. © Anthony Tognazzini /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Blue Note Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
In 1963 Cannonball Adderley signed with the Capitol label, retaining the rights to some master tapes recorded earlier while he was with Riverside. Jazz Workshop Revisited contains music much closer to the altoist's freewheeling Riverside period than to his R&B-ish Capitol dates. Adderley's greatest band -- a sextet with cornetist Nat Adderley, Yusef Lateef (on tenor, flute and oboe), pianist Joe Zawinul, bassist Sam Jones, and drummer Louis Hayes -- is featured on such exciting numbers as "Jessica's Day," Jones' "Unit 7," and "The Jive Samba." A special treat of this live date is hearing the leader's introductory words to several of the songs. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Fantasy Records

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This excellent live date from the Village Vanguard was the recording debut of the Adderley sextet, with Cannonball waxing eloquently and swingingly on alto, brother Nat charging ahead on cornet, and the versatile Yusef Lateef (who had joined the band only three weeks earlier) adding a bit of an edge on tenor, flute, and unusually for a jazz wind player, oboe on the odd, dirge-like "Syn-Anthesia." Also, this was the first recorded appearance of pianist Joe Zawinul -- a little over three years since his arrival in America -- in Cannonball's band. This group would be Zawinul's springboard to prominence in the jazz world, and readily apparent is how his compulsively funky mastery of bop and the blues had fused tightly with the Sam Jones/Louis Hayes rhythm section. Included is one of the earliest recordings of a Zawinul composition, "Scotch and Water," a happy, swinging blues. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1970 | Blue Note Records

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The Reverend Jesse Jackson gives an inspiring brief speech to open the festivities, and the Quintet begins with "Walk Tall," a lively jazz/R&B number. Named in honor of Jackson "Country Preacher" and written by keyboardist Joe Zawinul, the changing tempo tribute has two contrasting grooves: one's sad and reflective, the other happy and boisterous. The album tributes Jacksons' Operation Breadbasket program in Chicago, IL. Nat Adderley composed "Hummin'," a masterfully executed piece; the Adderley brothers' stinging solo's are complemented by Zawinul's sparkling piano play. Bassist Walter Booker shines on "Oh Babe," a vamp that owes more to blues than jazz, and Cannonball sings the bluesy lyrics like he had too much to drink. "Afro Spanish Omelet" has four parts: "Umbakwen" written by Nat finds Cannoball's sax at it's inquisitive best. Booker solos the entire 3:03 seconds of "Soli Tomba." "Oiga" is Zawinul's best solo, and drummer Roy McCurdy plays like a disturbed man surrounding Zawinul's probing electric piano with some imaginative percussioning. Cannonball displays well-trained chops on "Marabi" as he battles with brother Nat's coronet. Jesse Jackson kicks off "The Scene" while Cannoball gives thanks and group introductions over a roadhouse groove. © Andrew Hamilton /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Blue Note Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Thanks to its ownership of some of Cannonball Adderley's Riverside recordings, Capitol was able to stretch the definition of Best of Cannonball Adderley: The Capitol Years a bit in this hits collection. Beginning with a pair of live Riverside tracks from Adderley's short-lived sextet with Yusef Lateef ("Work Song," "Jive Samba"), the CD enters the Capitol years proper with the surprisingly effective treatment of "Fiddler on the Roof," continues with three hits centered around Joe Zawinul's soul/gospel electric piano ("Mercy Mercy Mercy," "Why Am I Treated So Bad?," and "Walk Tall"), the tension-wracked "74 Miles Away," and the relaxed "Country Preacher." There are missing ingredients, like the orchestral recordings, the excursions into electric music in the early '70s. Yet from the evidence of this strong lineup -- almost all of it recorded live, and often prefaced by Adderley's ingratiating spoken intros -- it would be very hard to argue (as some have) that his Capitol period was one long commercial sellout. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Fantasy Records

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This fine Riverside debut by Adderley was cut just a few months after the alto saxophonist had contributed to Miles Davis' stellar Milestones release. Joining Adderley for the six tracks here are fellow Davis alumni Philly Joe Jones on drums and Bill Evans on piano. These three are augmented by the wonderful and often-underrated Blue Mitchell on trumpet and the equally illustrious Sam Jones on bass. Everyone is in top form on a varied set that takes in two Adderley originals (the fine ballad "Straight Life" and "A Little Taste"), a classic Gigi Gryce number ("Minority"), and Miles' oft-covered "Nardis." Filling out the program, we have a rare Sam Jones-penned cut, "Blue Funk," and a lone standard in the Rogers & Hammerstein chestnut from Oklahoma, "People Will Say We're in Love." One of the highlights from Adderley's hard bop prime. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1987 | Fantasy Records

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For this CD reissue of a Riverside date, altoist Cannonball Adderley's 1961 Quintet (which includes cornetist Nat Adderley, pianist Victor Feldman, bassist Sam Jones and drummer Louis Hayes) is joined by guest pianist Wynton Kelly on five of the eight selections, during which Feldman switches quite effectively to vibes. The music falls between funky soul-jazz and hard bop, and each of the performances (particularly "Star Eyes" and "Well You Needn't") is enjoyable. The CD adds a new alternate take of "Lisa" and the previously unissued "O.P." to the original program. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1973 | Fantasy Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
After seven years with Capitol, Cannonball Adderley switched labels to Fantasy where he reunited with producer Orrin Keepnews and the quality of his music immediately improved. With Hal Galper as the band's keyboardist (he contributed three of the seven group originals to this LP), this version of the Quintet (actually Sextet with the addition of percussionist King Errison) was more jazz-oriented than previously while remaining modern and funky. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | TCB - The Montreux Jazz Label™

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1968 | EMI Catalogue

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Though labeled as a Cannonball Adderley Quintet session, this is actually a workout with a percussion section loaded with African drums, a big band, and in spots, voices -- all unidentified. Nevertheless, this is one of the best and most overlooked of the Cannonball Adderley Capitols, a rumbling session that bursts with the joy of working in an unfamiliar yet vital rhythmic context. Cannonball turns in one of his swinging-est solos through a Varitone electronic attachment on Caiphus Semenya's "Gumba Gumba" and "Marabi" is a real hip-jiggler; you can't sit still through it. Other highlights include Cannon preaching blue smoke in his own Afro-Cuban-blues-flavored "Hamba Nami," a dignified trip through Wes Montgomery's "Up and At It," and Nat Adderley's commanding work on cornet at all times. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Cannonball Adderley is in excellent form on this live date recorded on August 5, 1962, at the International Jazz Festival in Comblain-La-Tour, Belgium. The alto saxophonist fronts an amazing band comprised of brother Nat Adderley on cornet, Yusef Lateef on tenor sax and flute, Joe Zawinul on piano, Sam Jones on bass, and drummer Louis Hayes. The five selections include Lateef's composition "P. Bouk," with tremendous limber interplay between reeds and brass, followed by two favorites from the Adderley book of the era, "Gemini" and "Work Song." Lateef picks up the oboe on the traditional blues "Trouble in Mind" and the set is rounded out with "Dizzy's Business," once again showcasing fiery improvisation between the horns. Cannonball's good-natured stage manner is also on display, with a few off-the-cuff humorous asides. As a weird side note, Beach Party movie heartthrob Frankie Avalon was also on the bill -- he opened the show! Cannonball in Europe was originally released on Riverside in 1962, and later reissued by Landmark, but this is the first time the session has appeared on CD. © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1974 | Concord Records

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Cannonball Adderley is in generally good form on this 1974 recording. His Quintet at the time featured cornetist Nat Adderley, keyboardist Hal Galper, bassist Walter Booker and drummer Roy McCurdy. Guests on some selections include guitarist Phil Upchurch, keyboardist George Duke and (on "Bess, Oh Where's My Bess") veteran pianist Jimmy Jones. The emphasis is on recent group originals including the three part "Suite Cannon," two Galper compositions and Cannonball's "Pyramid." Nothing too earthshattering occurs but this is an improvement over many of Adderley's Capitol recordings. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Lone Hill Jazz

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Fantasy Records

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Norman Granz was on hand to record music from Cannonball Adderley's first European tour in 1960, but he and the Adderley estate have been parsimonious in dealing out the goods. It took 24 years for Part One, What Is This Thing Called Soul to emerge, and another 13 years passed before this follow-up album came out. But better late than never, as they say, and the reward is hearing Cannonball's alto in full ecstatic flight, lots of fighting work from brother Nat on cornet and the prized rhythm section of Victor Feldman (piano), Sam Jones (bass) and Louis Hayes (drums) in a state of complete rapport. Only "The Chant" is duplicated from the earlier album, and Cannonball's solo is a model of Parker-derived hard bop laced with his own highly rhythmic personality. Other than an overlong drum solo on "Bohemia After Dark," this is a most enjoyable slice of what, alas, is now history. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo