Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
HI-RES€31.99
CD€27.99

Full Operas - Released November 24, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Record of the Year - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - Victoire de la musique - 4 étoiles Classica
We will gladly forgive the occasional "weakness" in sound technology in this recording of Troyens by Berlioz (recorded live in concert in April 2017). In light of the first-rate quality of the music and vocals that appear on the disc (a majority of which are French voices, with Stéphane Degout at their head) this immense work is from the Strasbourg Philharmonic Orchestra and the three choirs which have been brought together – because the work demands immense swelling choirs – which are the choir of the Opéra national du Rhin, the Opéra National de Bade, and the Strasbourg Philharmonic's own choir. This recording rests, of course, on the complete original edition, which gives the listener a chance to hear Les Troyens as the work was performed in 1863, at the Théâtre-Lyrique, in which some intense chopping saw Acts I and II condensed into one part and Acts III to V into another, producing two distinct operas (La Prise de Troie and Les Troyens à Carthage). We also get a taste, naturally, of Berlioz's immensely rich orchestral innovations: with every new work, he would invent some exciting new prototype from scratch, never content to rest on his laurels. The listener should note the presence of six saxhorns, recently invented by Adolphe Sax (of whom Berlioz was an indefatigable champion, even if he didn't often use his instruments in his scores, no doubt because of the poor quality of the early instrumentalists who learned - however well or badly - Sax's instruments); bass clarinet, and an army of percussion pieces including several instruments which must have been rare in those days: crotales, goblet drums, tom-toms, thunder sheets... clearly, this is a milestone in the Berlioz discography. © SM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€15.99
CD€13.49

Secular Vocal Music - Released November 10, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Le Choix de France Musique - Victoire de la musique - Choc de Classica - Choc Classica de l'année - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
This project originated, Sabine Devieilhe says, from her desire to tackle Lakmé. In fact, Delibes was able to compose for her heroine some of the most memorable pages for coloratura soprano, starting with the hugely famous "air des clochettes" [Bell Song]. And as Western ears at the time were eager for musical and poetic voyages, and sensations from far-off lands, we find these same Oriental fantasies with Maurice Delage, who himself went on a grand tour of India, where he found modal colours, but also in Madame Chrysanthème by Messager or Rossignol by Stravinsky, to say nothing of the Egypt of Thaïs as portrayed by Anatole France and Massenet. Sabine Devieilhe, who won the "Lyrical revelation" prize at Victoires de la musique classique in 2013 before winning "Lyrical artist of the year" at the same ceremony – certainly not an unfair judgement of this particular artist – started her recording career with recordings of Rameau, Bach and Mozart, before launching into the lyrical repertoire from more recent years… And with great success! © SM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Symphonic Music - Released April 24, 2015 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Victoire de la musique - Choc de Classica
From
HI-RES€13.49
CD€8.99

Chamber Music - Released September 20, 2005 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - RTL d'Or - Victoire de la musique - Hi-Res Audio
From
CD€9.99

World - Released May 22, 2013 | AGFB

Distinctions Victoire de la musique
From
CD€21.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2013 | Universal Music Division Polydor

Distinctions Victoire de la musique
While the future of Bloc Party continues to remain up in the air thanks to a seemingly never-ending series of contradictory press statements, fans looking for a new fix of angular electro-rock could do worse than to check out Lille quintet Skip the Use's second album, Can Be Late. Produced by Tim Goldsworthy (LCD Soundsystem, Massive Attack), many of its 14 tracks hark back to the energetic indie disco of Silent Alarm, from the propulsive call-and-response of "Mirror" to the trancey post-punk of "The Face," while frontman Mat Bastard's animated tones are a dead ringer for Kele Okereke's anguished yelps. Slightly derivative they may be, but the band are far less enthralling when they venture outside their convincing tribute act territory. "Darkness Paradise" (one of three tracks lifted from their 2011 Sound from the Shadow EP) is a muddy slice of Brit-pop which recalls the indie-landfill acts of the Cool Britannia era, "Bastard Song" is an experimental fusion of squelchy electro, dub wobbles, and riotous riffs which suggests their decision to abandon their earlier punk incarnation was a wise one, and the plinky-plonky "Cup of Coffee" is pure ska-pop by numbers. The attempts to ape the bass-led funk rock of mid-'90s Red Hot Chili Peppers suggest they have two options should they ever choose to enter Stars in Their Eyes, particularly the summery "Ghost," whose infectious children's singalong chorus echoes One Hot Minute's "Aeroplane." Can Be Late couldn't really make the band's influences any more obvious, but while there's nothing new here, it's the kind of lively and immediate record that the indie rock scene across the Channel could do with more of. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

French Music - Released January 1, 2013 | Universal Music Division Polydor

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Victoire de la musique
Occupying the same eclectic chanteuse territory as Emilie Simon and Camille, Sophie Huriaux, aka La Grande Sophie, has been hopping genres since the mid-'90s but has only recently begun to achieve the same recognition as her counterparts. Following the Grand Prix du Disque success of 2009's Des Vagues et des Ruisseaux and the honor of being invited to write for such iconic French singers as Françoise Hardy and Sylvie Vartan, her sixth album, La Place du Fantôme, should help consolidate her long-overdue success. Produced by jazz collective Le Sacre du Tympan, it's a typically adventurous affair taking in everything from medieval folk ("Ma Radio") to playful Gallic jazz ("Quand On Parle de Toi") to grungy alt-pop ("Sucrer les Fraises"), while also venturing out onto the dancefloor with the Goldfrapp-esque electro-glam of opener "Bye Bye" and the funky '70s disco of "Dans Ton Royaume." But it's on the more introspective numbers when her sultry smoky vocals best reveal their charms, particularly on the atmospheric trip-hop balladry of "Tu Fais Ton Age" and the stunning closer, "Suzanne," which sees her transform from wistful troubadour to operatic banshee on a beautifully restrained slice of melancholic folk. An audacious but still resolutely classy affair, La Place du Fantôme has set the benchmark for Gallic pop in 2012 pretty high. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
From
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Electronic - Released June 25, 2012 | Parlophone (France)

Hi-Res Distinctions Victoire de la musique - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
Since the advent of acid jazz in the mid-'80s, the many electronic-jazz hybrids to come down the pipe have steadily grown more mature, closer to a balanced fusion that borrows the spontaneity and emphasis on group interaction of classic jazz while still emphasizing the groove and elastic sound of electronic music. For his second album, French producer Ludovic Navarre expanded the possibilities of his template for jazzy house by recruiting a sextet of musicians to solo over his earthy productions. The opener "Rose Rouge" is an immediate highlight, as an understated Marlena Shaw vocal sample ("I want you to get together/put your hands together one time"), trance-state piano lines, and a ride-on-the-rhythm drum program frames solos by trumpeter Pascal Ohse and baritone Claudio de Qeiroz. For "Montego Bay Spleen," Navarre pairs an angular guitar solo by Ernest Ranglin with a deep-groove dub track, complete with phased effects and echoey percussion. "Land Of..." moves from a Hammond- and horn-led soul-jazz stomp into Caribbean territory, marked by more hints of dub and the expressive Latin percussion of Carneiro. Occasionally, Navarre's programming (sampled or otherwise) grows a bit repetitious -- even for dance fans, to say nothing of the jazzbo crowd attracted by the album's Blue Note tag. Though it is just another step on the way to a perfect blend of jazz and electronic, Tourist is an excellent one. © John Bush /TiVo
From
HI-RES€14.99
CD€9.99

World - Released April 2, 2012 | Because Music

Hi-Res Distinctions Victoire de la musique - Sélection Les Inrocks - Hi-Res Audio
On 2012's Folila (which translates as "music" in Bambara), Mali's famed Amadou & Mariam, the husband-and-wife duo, effortlessly prove that "purist" alarm calls about melding popular and traditional musics across geographies because they dilute authenticity are not only inherently false, but their motivations are suspect. Amadou & Mariam originally cut twin albums -- same songs, tunings, and tempos -- one in New York with Yeah Yeah Yeahs guitarist Nick Zinner, Santigold, Theophilus London, members of TV on the Radio and Antibalas, the Scissor Sisters' Jake Shears, and Bertrand Cantat. The other was a Malian offering, cut in Bamako with master musicians, including Bassekou Kouyaté on ngoni, Zoumana Tereta on sokou, and Toumani Diabaté on kora, to name a few. A possibility presented itself when they took the completed sessions to producer Marc-Antoine Moreau in Paris. He was asked to try to bring the albums together. Moreau enlisted other producer/engineers -- Kennie Takahashi, Renaud Letang, Josh Grant, and Antoine Halet -- to assist. The end result is an organic-sounding masterpiece of cross-cultural collaboration, sung in three languages -- Bambara, French, and English (sometimes in the same song). Production magic aside, this project wouldn't have succeeded were it not for truly amazing songs (written by the duo) and inspired performances by all the musicians. "Dougou Badia" features crunchy guitar interplay between Amadou's instantly recognizable percussive style and Zinner's more rockist attack; it's fuel for a soaring duet between Mariam and Santigold. "Wily Kataso" features Amadou & Mariam with Kyp and Tunde from TV on the Radio on lead vocals; the meld of the two guitarists with Kouyaté's ngoni and the popping rhythm section is infectious. "Metemya" features Shears and Amadou's voices with the latter's knotty, raw guitar and Wurlitzer from Antibalas' Victor Axelrod amid layers of organic percussion. "Nebe Miri" features London rapping and singing in complement to Amadou's lead vocals, all drenched in a soulful meld of harmonies, three guitars, keyboards, and dundun drums. "C'est Pas Facile Pour les Aigles" is a rave-up that combines highlife, power pop, and Bo Diddley, and features Ebony Bones singing with Mariam. On "Sans Toi," Mali's traditional instruments such as sokou and kamale ngoni appear alongside guitar, piano, and the duo's hypnotic vocals. The haunting "Mogo" features bass clarinet, ngoni, djembe, dundun drums, and slide and rockist guitars and chants. "Chérie" is simply presented with Mariam above a Malian children's choir, with Diabaté's kora adding a carefree rural feel to close it. Forget prejudices about "world music"; Folila is great music. Period. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
From
CD€12.49

Electronic - Released September 3, 2012 | Universal Music Division Virgin Records

Booklet Distinctions Victoire de la musique
Previously best known for winning the Disco Mix Club World Team DJ Championship four consecutive years in a row, French turntablist crew C2C brought their unique electro-funk sound to the masses with their chart-topping debut album, Tetra. Alongside the hit single "The Cell," and collaborations with Pigeon John ("Because of You"), Olivier Daysoul ("Who Are You"), and Jay-Jay Johanson ("Give Up the Ghost"), there are also four tracks plucked from their 2012 EP Down the Road. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
From
CD€26.49

French Music - Released October 26, 2011 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions Victoire de la musique
From
CD€14.49

French Music - Released October 17, 2011 | Columbia

Distinctions Victoire de la musique - 3 étoiles Technikart
From
CD€12.49

Hip-Hop/Rap - Released September 26, 2011 | Wagram Music - 3ème Bureau - 7th Magnitude

Distinctions Victoire de la musique - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Described as France's answer to Eminem, Normandy rapper Aurelien Cotentin, aka Orelsan, proved he was just as capable of creating controversy as his U.S. counterpart with the leaked track "Sale Pute," a misogynistic tale of domestic violence that had everyone from women's rights groups to the Culture Minister calling for his music to be banned. Perhaps burned by the hostile response, his second album, Le Chant des Sirènes, slightly tones down his venom-spitting persona in favor of a more mature and reflective approach that largely deals with the pressures of his notorious rise to fame. Despite this less vitriolic lyrical stance, the album's sound is still just as dark as 2009 debut Perdu d'Avance, as Skread's claustrophobic production shifts from industrial dubstep ("Raelsan," "Mauvaise Idée") to aggressive crunk (Gringe collaboration "Ils Sont Cools") to nocturnal Streets-esque suburban rap ("Finir Mal") throughout, while even its poppier moments such as the Timbaland-inspired title track, the clattering R&B of "Si Seul" (featuring a rare melodic lead vocal from Orelsan), and the low-key acoustic hip-pop of "La Morale" are laced with a sense of melancholy that suggests the past two years have hit the 29-year-old hard. Elsewhere, the authentic old-skool vinyl-scratching pastiche of "1990" and the bizarre fusion of twinkling music boxes, nursery rhyme melodies, and childlike vocals on "La Petite Marchande de Porte-Clefs" briefly lighten the mood, while there are flashes of his former self on his biting attack on Parisian society, "Suicide Social." But while Le Chant des Sirènes is unlikely to make as many headlines as his previous output, it's an inventive if admittedly downbeat progression suggesting that the enfant terrible of French rap might be growing up. © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Jazz - Released April 27, 2011 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions Victoire de la musique - Lauréat du prix Constantin
The debut from this half-Moroccan, half-French singer/songwriter is pleasant. It has its moments that glisten, but for the most part it passes by without making a great impression. "Kiss & Thrills," which revolves around a very simple, bluesy riff, works superbly, almost hypnotic, as if someone had dropped Ali Farka Touré into North Africa alongside a female singer. The lush layered vocals of the closer, "Old Friends," set up a deliciously dreamy atmosphere, while "Stand Up" seems to mix chanson with touches of modernity to good effect and a surprising Arabic interlude. Unfortunately, the remaining eight tracks have little to make them stand out, being mostly French blandness (although largely sung in English). Zahra has talent, and a nice kittenish voice, but it all needs more development and editing. © Chris Nickson /TiVo
From
CD€9.99

Jazz - Released January 18, 2010 | Parlophone (France)

Distinctions Victoire de la musique - Lauréat du prix Constantin
The debut from this half-Moroccan, half-French singer/songwriter is pleasant. It has its moments that glisten, but for the most part it passes by without making a great impression. "Kiss & Thrills," which revolves around a very simple, bluesy riff, works superbly, almost hypnotic, as if someone had dropped Ali Farka Touré into North Africa alongside a female singer. The lush layered vocals of the closer, "Old Friends," set up a deliciously dreamy atmosphere, while "Stand Up" seems to mix chanson with touches of modernity to good effect and a surprising Arabic interlude. Unfortunately, the remaining eight tracks have little to make them stand out, being mostly French blandness (although largely sung in English). Zahra has talent, and a nice kittenish voice, but it all needs more development and editing. © Chris Nickson /TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Rock - Released January 1, 2010 | Universal Music Division Barclay

Booklet Distinctions Victoire de la musique - Sélection Les Inrocks
France does not have much of a presence on the rock map, but Gaëtan Roussel's debut solo album prove that the country still has something to offer in that department. The record's nothing groundbreaking, to be sure -- the music is built around clean guitar strumming and simplistic but bouncy beats that sound vaguely retro, as if Joe Dassin or even the Beatles were in a mood for some groove, but drew inspiration from Montmartre street music. The vocals are also a focal point, though Roussel does not qualify for chanson -- he is too reserved for that, and is never trying to make his cocky half-whisper, half-chant sexy (though it still is every now and then). This setup suffices to make the music moderately fun, just because Roussel can pull off some hooks with these admittedly sparse means, but thankfully, he does not stop there, adding a bit of electronica to the mix -- rhythms, mostly, but synth textures, too, sometimes to go with the quirky guitars and sometimes to replace them, as on "DYWD," which would make a prime-rate disco cut were it not too dry and too smart for the style. Clever arrangements don't end there, either, whirling from the annoyingly sticky refrain of the opening track to theatrically noir-ish strings and brass of the closing cut, which sounds almost like an epic version of Pram with their nighttime-cat-stroll mood (the vibe is present throughout the record, but only reaches full bloom in the finale). Purists may note that the catchiest moments of Ginger are those where English lyrics are used, but that may as well be a tongue-in-cheek trick of Roussel's, who is firmly in control of the hooks, moods, and swagger on all of his tunes. © Alexey Eremenko /TiVo
From
CD€8.99

Jazz - Released December 21, 2009 | Frémeaux & associés

Distinctions Victoire de la musique
The music on this fluffy release is so sweet that it's surprising the number of calories are not listed. Classical players are added to Bolling's regular rhythm section in different pairs for three numbers apiece (including flutist Jean-Pierre Rampal) but the results are consistently insipid and saccharine with very little improvisation by anyone but the pianist/leader. There is not much here to interest jazz listeners. © Scott Yanow /TiVo

Solo Piano - Released April 20, 2009 | Paraty Productions

Booklet Distinctions Victoire de la musique
Download not available
From
CD€14.49

Techno - Released January 1, 2009 | Jive Epic

Distinctions Victoire de la musique
From
CD€13.99

French Music - Released January 1, 2008 | Universal Music Division Barclay

Distinctions Victoire de la musique - Sélection Disques de l'année Les Inrocks
Released a year before Alain Bashung died of lung cancer on March 14, 2009, at the age of 61, Bleu Pétrole serves as a superb swan song for the chanson legend. This final full-length effort was a laudable comeback for Bashung, who hadn't released a new studio album since L'Imprudence (2002), and it returned him to the top of the French charts for the first time in six years. In some ways, Bleu Pétrole is similar to L'Imprudence. While that album was written in collaboration with Jean Fauque and Christophe Miossec, Bleu Pétrole is written in collaboration with Gaëtan Roussel of the band Louise Attaque and Gérard Manset, a contemporary of Bashung's whose career likewise goes back to the late '60s. Roussel is also credited with producing the album, along with multi-instrumentalist Mark Plati. Moreover, both albums were critically acclaimed as latter-day masterpieces. The difference is, whereas L'Imprudence is often described as a noir album, a somber and tortured portrait of an aging man, Bleu Pétrole is more luminous. Among the several highlights of the album are "Résidents de la République" and "Sur un Trapèze," both written solely by Roussel. Manset contributes another couple standouts, the nine-minute album centerpiece "Comme un Lego," and his 1975 hit "Il Voyage en Solitaire," the latter of which closes Bleu Pétrole (and in turn the recording career of Bashung) on a perfect note. Beside the contributions of Roussel and Manset, there's a wistful cover version of Graeme Allwright's adaption of Leonard Cohen's folk classic "Suzanne." In addition to the songs themselves, Bleu Pétrole is impressive from a musical standpoint. A trio of accomplished guitarists (Roussel, Marc Ribot, Arman Méliès) infuse the album with touches of rock, the rhythm section (comprised of Plati and several others) leans toward jazz, and the string arrangements supply an air of grandness. Furthermore, the music varies from song to song; for instance, "Vénus" relies almost entirely on a string arrangement and a tiny bit of banjo, and then, three songs later, "Je Tuerai la Pianiste" is driven by a powerful bass riff and blasts of electric guitar. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo