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Alternative & Indie - Released October 23, 2020 | Transgressive

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This third album by the Malian desert blues quartet follows 2017's Resistance and betrays their Western rock influences in the clearest sense to date. The Bamako act's sound is still underpinned here by Malian rhythms, but the lead singles "Worry," "Badala," and "Barre" nod in places to acts such as Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin. © James Wilkinson /TiVo
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Folk - Released October 23, 2020 | 4AD

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Folk - Released October 22, 2020 | 4AD

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 16, 2020 | Concord Records

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Vocal Jazz - Released October 2, 2020 | Verve

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In 1962, Ella Fitzgerald was at the height of her powers, about midway through recording her now-iconic series of "songbook" albums and, two years earlier, having released a barnstormer of a live album, Ella in Berlin, that solidified her position as one of the most talented and popular musicians working in the jazz idiom. Her only competition at the time was, essentially, Frank Sinatra and herself. During the course of 1962, she would release three albums: two complementary collaborations with Nelson Riddle that further pushed her into crossover territory without tarnishing her credibility or minimizing her skills, and the oft-overlooked Rhythm is My Business, a hard-swinging set that comes off breezy and soulful, but is a remarkable document of the strength of Fitzgerald and her band during this era. And it's that strength that's captured on The Lost Berlin Tapes, recorded in concert at Berlin’s Sportpalast that year. Verve Records founder Norman Granz frequently recorded live sets of many of his acts (Fitzgerald especially), and that's what accounts for both the existence and the remarkable fidelity of these "lost" tapes. (Though they were never truly lost; Granz had just stashed them away). From a performance perspective, it's unbelievable that this concert recording sat unheard for more than a half-century. Brimming with energy and benefiting from the confidence that can only come from being at the top of one's game, Ella and her band careen through 17 songs with a full-throated fervor that's greeted with an equally enthusiastic response from the crowd. The set both swings incredibly hard and evinces a cool, sophisticated polish, a combination that, again, pretty much only she and Sinatra were delivering at this scale during the era. It's the sort of casual excellence that's made to look deceptively easy. (And yes, she aces the version of "Mack the Knife" here.) Releases like this—especially in the aftermath of the devastating Universal fire that destroyed so many iconic album masters and so much unreleased material—prove that, even when we think a barrel has been fully scraped or a vault fully excavated, there will always be warm, welcome surprises to be found in the archives of these legendary artists. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 2, 2020 | Heavenly Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzissime
Sharp, dry and unyielding, the neo-post punk scene, making waves in the UK, is hitting the dance floors thanks to Working Men’s Club. With their first album, Eponym, the young quartet from Todmorden, near Manchester, reignite the flames that once burned with New Order (Power, Corruption & Lies), The Fall, Human League, Gang of Four, D.A.F and Suicide. The young frontman Sydney Minsky-Sargeant sets the scene: ‘There isn’t much to do in Todmorden when you’re a kid. The Town is quite isolated and it can be very depressing to live in a place where, in winter, sunlight only lasts a few hours.' Locked in his room, Minsky-Sargeant spent his time tinkering with and mixing synthesisers, guitars and drums. The record blends chanting vocals, Stakhanovite rhythms, sickly guitar riffs and massive bass sounds. It's easy to lose control of one's body as it grooves and contorts to the rhythm of this unusual acid electro-rock, often reminiscent of early LCD Soundsystem. Minsky-Sargeant sports a t shirt marked with the word ‘SOCIALISM’ as the group christen their song John Cooper Clarke (the ever-popular punk poet), lighting up the grey skies of their native Yorkshire. Occasionally, Minsky-Sargeant relaxes into hedonistic new wave with tracks like Outside. But when he loses his temper, the electro-funk-tinged disco punk oozes from his soul (Teeth). This is a truly stunning record with impressively tight production, courtesy of Ross Orton (The Fall, M.I.A, Arctic Monkeys). No time to lose, have a listen! © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 2, 2020 | Myrios Classics

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"“We need Bach’s music, regardless of the instrument” – Tabea ZimmermannTen years after her acclaimed album “Solo” with the first two cello suites of Johann Sebastian Bach, violist Tabea Zimmermann now sets her sights on Suites Nos. 3 and 4. She pairs them with excerpts from György Kurtág’s cycle “Games, Signs & Messages”, selecting six numbers to form her own personal homage to Bach. For what kind of instruments did Bach write his solo suites BWV 1007-1012? How did they sound, what did they look like? This subject still gives rise to much speculation. Johann Peter Kellner’s manuscript copy from the early 1700s is one of the two main sources for the six solo suites, and it indicates a viola basso. The violoncello had not yet become standardized in terms of size, construction, and playing technique; Bach probably had instruments in mind such as the violoncello piccolo or the viola da spalla. The latter was a viola attached in front of the body by a strap: Bach performed the viola da spalla in public himself – possibly these suites. Tabea Zimmermann has not switched her musical hardware for this recording: here she plays her 1980 Vatelot viola with a classical bow.In 2009, the album “Solo” (MYR003) launched Tabea Zimmermann’s collaboration with the myrios classics label. The release was crowned with a multitude of international awards: Gramophone Editor’s Choice, “Stern des Monats” in Fono Forum, 4f in Télérama and 5 Stars in the Italian magazine Musica; moreover, in response to that groundbreaking recording, the jury of the coveted German ECHO Klassik Prize selected Tabea Zimmermann as “2010 Instrumentalist of the Year”."
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Funk - Released September 25, 2020 | Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Prince and the Revolution released the Parade album in March 1986, after which, the following Prince projects were conceived, mostly completed, and abandoned: a single LP Dream Factory, a double-LP Dream Factory, the 3-LP Crystal Ball, a musical known as either The Dawn or Dream Factory, and a single LP Camille. Finally, in March 1987, the double-LP Sign O' The Times was released, cherry-picking highlights from most of those projects and adding brand-new material. It is—even for an artist who has gone down in history as one of the most prolific pop musicians of the 20th century—an astonishing volume of work. Even more astonishing is the consistently high quality of the work. The original Sign O' The Times has long been recognized as Prince's creative zenith, garnering the sort of contemporaneous and retrospective critical admiration that very few double albums have ever claimed. But the fact that this work was the result of a 27-year-old creating at such a fast clip and such a high level is, when you stop and think about it, not just the mark of a genius at the top of his game, but something truly singular. That uniqueness may bedevil listeners of this Super Deluxe Edition. While the Sign O' The Times album itself is, of course, still an incredible work that benefits immensely from the careful remastering (this album, probably more than any other in Prince's catalog, was in dire need of it), there is no easy way to mentally process its 45 unreleased tracks. They are sequenced in chronological order of recording, which makes sense, as there really is no other simple way the Estate could have presented this work. However—believe it or not—this isn't even everything! Due to licensing restrictions and the fact that many of these tracks exist in multiple versions, there is no way this set could be comprehensive. So, while this presentation does deny listeners the chance to compile their own versions of the Dream Factory or Camille albums from the unreleased material, it also declines to provide any sort of narrative listening experience. Which is probably for the best. When, in just two years, you can go from the height of the Revolution's powers ("In A Large Room With No Light,""Soul Psychodelicide") through a collaboration with Miles Davis ("Can I Play With U?") and a run of inventive, immersive home-studio creations ("Cosmic Day") and then on to the sounds that would define Lovesexy ("The Cocoa Boys,""Walkin' in Glory"), the only story to tell is one of a prodigy at his most prodigious. With four albums' worth of unreleased material here—nearly all of which is in surprisingly solid sonic condition—your best bet is to proceed slowly, soak it all in, and find your favorites. And, if the original album and 45 unreleased tracks wasn't enough, this set also includes a handful of edits and remixes along with the two b-sides that were released contemporaneously with the album and an absolutely blazing live set from the album's European tour. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 25, 2020 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Unless System Of A Down reunites and proves us otherwise, there's no nu-metal band that's aged better than Deftones. Sure, the Sacramento group has always veered closer to alt-metal auteurs like Tool and A Perfect Circle than Korn or Limp Bizkit, and if that maturity came at the cost of some cheap commercial hits back in the day, then it's paid off tenfold in the long haul. On their ninth record Ohms, their first in four years, Deftones are a bunch of guys pushing 50 who sound fresher and more energized than most metal bands half their age. The band spent the 2010s toying with increasingly experimental and cerebral concepts—the sort of thing artsy bands do when they're 15 years into the game—but Ohms is a brilliant and undeniable return to form. The album marks a reunion with their original producer Terry Date (who worked the boards for their first four records), but it also brings some new blood into the fold: guitarist Stephen Carpenter's nine-string guitar. The beastly axe allows for subterranean low-ends that sound spectacular in contrast to Chino Moreno's soaring vocals. On songs like "Error" and "Radiant City," the palm-muted chugs recall gurgling djent tones, adding a rejuvenating heft to Deftones' signature blend of dreamy and dastardly. Beyond the exquisite production and all-around knockout performances, Ohms is just a great collection of songs. "Ceremony" features a smashing chorus, just a total wallop of a song, while tracks like the surging, spastic "This Link Is Dead" and the metalcore-ish "Urantia" center their unmatched might. The record's title-track closer features a bluesy riff that splatters into gangly shredding, ending the album on a mountainous peak that brings to mind early Mastodon. Considering how long Deftones have been at it, Ohms is technically a late-career record. But in this instance, at least, age is just a number. This band sounds like they're just hitting their stride. © Eli Enis/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 25, 2020 | Ambronay Éditions

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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R&B - Released September 18, 2020 | RCA Records Label

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Going by the album cover, it’s pretty obvious what this record entails: Alicia Keys lays herself bare with an album that shows all the different facets of her personality. Often, when an artist makes introspection so explicit it’s a bad sign. People who want to find themselves too much risk sounding a bit unoriginal and generic. But there are exceptions to every rule. ALICIA is actually a wonderfully unique album which manages - contrary to the singer’s other records - to venture down many different avenues without constantly trying to induce tears. Between the Jamaican influences of Wasted Energy and Solange-inspired melodies, Alicia Keys often manages to abandon her piano (her favourite instrument) to concentrate not on vocal performance or positivity speeches but on an openness found in a lot of recent R&B. The result? Brilliant electronic tracks such as Authors of Forever or Me x 7, featuring Tierra Wack who drops a short but stunning verse. And let’s not forget the other guests. We find a selection of talented artists from Jill Scott (on Jill Scott) to Sampha (3 Hour Drive) and Snoh Aalegra (You Save Me), as well as smoother, more kitschy collaborations with Miguel (Show Me Love) and Khalid (So Done). While she occasionally goes back to basics with piano-voice tracks like Perfect Way to Die or Good Job, Alicia Keys reveals here her most authentic and musically-engaging album to date. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz
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Contemporary Jazz - Released September 18, 2020 | Bonsaï Music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 18, 2020 | X-Ray Production

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Indian Music - Released September 18, 2020 | Glitterbeat Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
After a first album which turned the heads of all fans of the world's electronic music scene, Maghreb United, the multifaceted Tunisian Sofyann Ben Youssef has set off for the roads of South East Asia. The second volume in his Ammar 808 project which, as its name indicates, is made using Roland’s legendary drum machine, the TR-808 (used by the pioneers of techno and hip-hop n the 80s). The Brussels-based producer installed himself for three weeks in Chennai, by the gulf of Bengal where he used local talents to make an album exploding with Carnatic music like we have rarely heard before. The album marks a kind of return to sources for Sofyann Ben Youssef who went to study the sitar and the tablas in New Delhi when he was 20 years old. A true concept album, Global Control / Invisible Invasion is an enormous sonic slap in the face with some completely insane tracks including the 6 minute trance song Mahaganapatim featuring incredible bass kicks and chaotic tablas. The first part of the record is sometimes comparable to Baltimore’s booty music, notably in Duryodhana which features the strident sound of the zika, a little traditional Tunisian flute, among unrestrained percussions. For all its flamboyance that will doubtless impress his fellow DJs, Ammar 808 is more accessible towards the end with the excellent Geeta duniki, a sort of electroriental synthpop which proves definitively the pertinence of the Tunisian musician’s vision. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 18, 2020 | Castle Face

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama
When a band have released as many albums as Thee Oh Sees, or as they are known now Osees, it would make sense that occasionally they would put out a dog, or at the very least some fraying around the edges may start to show. John Dwyer and his crew show no signs of letdown, burnout, or stagnation on 2020's Protean Threat, the group's 300th record, more or less. It's just as weird, fiery, hooky, strange, and avant-punk as anything they've released; the unbroken hot streak they're on continues to throw off sparks like an overheating amp that's about to catch fire. Their last couple records took the band's formula and twisted it into complex, proggy shapes, sometimes stretching the songs long past the punk-approved three-minute time limit. Here, the group stuff all their experimental exploration into much shorter songs, invest them with some real-world lyric concerns, and inject most of them with rocket fuel. Much of the album has the jagged, buzzing insanity of early Oh Sees records, but where those records were blasts of noise, here the jazz and prog influences the band have gotten into so deeply invest the songs with a chewy oddness that helps them hit harder than they might otherwise. The album kicks off with a couple songs that scrape the ceiling with their intensity and untamed energy. "Scramble Suit" has thrillingly abrasive jolts of static, and on the herky-jerky "Dreary Nonsense" the swirling guitars sound like two avant-garde saxophonists battling to a breathless draw. After this assault on the senses, they immediately pull back on the throttle with a pair of creepy-crawly midtempo jams -- "Upbeat Ritual" and "Red Study" -- that trade out the skronk in favor of a malevolent restraint. The rest of the record jumps between these two sides of the garage-prog scale. Tracks like "Mizmuth" and "Persuaders Up!" peel the paint from the walls with the fuzz-sharpened guitars, pummeling double-drum attack, and Dwyer's yelped vocals, while the synth-damaged "Wing Run" and the wizardly proggy "If I Had My Way" sneak into the pleasure center of the brain quietly instead of knocking the door right down. The band are equally adept at both -- as they have proven over and over -- and only seem to be getting better as they absorb more influences and subvert them to their own purposes. Protean Threat is their most focused and intense record in a few years and the change is welcome, like a deep breath after a long battle scene. Speaking of that, it's definitely a struggle to make good, verging on great, records over a long career; most bands fold like a tomato can facing Ali, but the Osees are winning with ease. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 18, 2020 | Lusafrica

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Mélodies (French) - Released September 11, 2020 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Sabine Devieilhe and Alexandre Tharaud bring their customary clarity, finesse and insight to the works of four composers who defined the path of French art song or "mélodie" from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. In an imaginatively balanced recital, the two French luminaries perform Fauré, Debussy, Ravel and Poulenc. Their programme, built around Ravel's Cinq Chansons populaires grecques and Debussy's Verlaine setting Ariettes oubliées, takes up the themes of love, war and death and offers both favourite songs like Fauré's Après un rêve and some rarer treasures. © Erato
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Art Songs, Mélodies & Lieder - Released September 11, 2020 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Nearly every setting of the poems by Kerner, Chamisso, Andersen and Heine heard in this recital dates from 1840, the year Schumann found himself totally engrossed with the song genre, producing no fewer than 138 individual lieder. This creative vein seems to mirror the inner torments that gripped the young composer at the time, while revealing the extraordinary range of his musical invention and unequalled talent of storyteller, as Samuel Hasselhorn demonstrates here, after winning first prize at the 2018 Queen Elisabeth Competition: the young German baritone’s first recording for harmonia mundi is a veritable love letter to this most intimate of art forms. © harmonia mundi
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Folk - Released September 4, 2020 | Drag City Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
In 1999, at a time when he was a nervous wreck and singing under the name Smog, Bill Callahan opened his Knock Knock album with a song called Let's Move to the Country. It was about stopping travelling and moving to the country, “just you and me”. At the end of the song, two sentences were left strangely incomplete: “Let's start…/Let's have...”. Twenty years later, Callahan covered Let's Move to the Country on Gold Record, and he’s filled in the blanks: “Let's start a family / Let's have a baby / or maybe two / ooh ooh oooh”. In real life, he settled down and started a family. He anchored himself, tamed his anxiety and opened a new chapter in his very long discography. Bill Callahan’s albums have always been intense. But in the last couple of years they have become intensely peaceful. There’s no stylistic revolution on Gold Record: Callahan always harvests his songs in the field of Americana, between wasteland country and bluesy folk by the fireside. And what makes him unique and exciting belongs only to him: that dry, low voice that hasn’t changed since the first version of Let's Move to the Country, some unusual production details, lyrics like an existential diary inspired by everyday life experiences - one song about breakfast, another about neighbours, another about Ry Cooder. A touch of humour, too. For example, Bill Callahan begins the song Pigeons with the words “Hello, I'm Johnny Cash” and ends it with a “Sincerely, L. Cohen”. In his own way (lurking in the shadows and happy to be there), he has taken over from the two giants with Gold Record. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released September 4, 2020 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama
In 2019, at the age of 22, Alexandre Kantorow became the first French pianist to win the prestigious Tchaikovsky Competition. Before then he had released three acclaimed albums, awarded distinctions such as "Diapason d'or de l'Année" and Gramophone's "Editor's Choice" and earning Kantorow descriptions ranging from 'Liszt reincarnated' to 'a firebreathing virtuoso with a poetic charm and innate stylistic mastery'. The present recital, his first release since the Tchaikovsky Competition, offers plenty of scope for virtuosity, poetry and charm, always filtered through an acute stylistic consciousness. The programme is constructed around three rhapsodies, a genre whose improvisatory character corresponds perfectly with the spirit of Romanticism but here interpreted by three highly distinct artistic temperaments: Franz Liszt, Johannes Brahms and Béla Bartók. © BIS Records