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Classical - Released June 11, 2021 | SWR Classic

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The two extended visits in London, in 1791 and 1794, were the greatest triumph in the career of Joseph Haydn. By that time he had already composed 92 symphonies, 12 more came into being while he was in London. The English were stunned by his new masterpieces, which Haydn directed personally. They knew that they were in the presence of the greatest composer in the world. Mozart was already dead and Beethoven not yet known. In September 2009 during the "Europäisches Musikfest" the SWR Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart and Sir Roger Norrington celebrated the memory of Joseph Haydn by performing and recording live all 12 London symphonies. They focused – with regards on orchestra size, seating, tempo, phrasing, articulation and sound – on historical performing style, their aim being to render the majesty, the folk-like simplicity, the infectious sense of dance, the surprises, and the humor characteristic to the Father of the symphony. © SWR Classic
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Jazz - Released June 11, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released May 14, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Jazz - Released May 14, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Jazz - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released April 9, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Stories about Wunderlich's meteoric rise to success, his incredibly heavy workload or his seemingly effortless acquisition of new repertoire have been told again and again – sometimes painting an idealized and sometimes a distorted picture of the artist. The nine installments of the SWR retrospective that have been released by SWR Classic to this day feature Fritz Wunderlich as a singer of songs, an (unequalled) Mozart tenor, a brilliant interpreter of the greatest tenor hits, a fascinating singer of operettas and as a tasteful interpreter of light music, to name but a few of the genres that made up his repertoire. Though Fritz Wunderlich remains until today a widely appreciated and admired singer, there are some facets to his artistic side that are still relatively unknown. The tenth and last installment presents Fritz Wunderlich as an interpreter of the big works of sacred music, an aspect that has to be considered as an essential part of his artistic profile. © SWR Classic
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Classical - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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This is the first orchestral release of the new SWR Symphonieorchester Stuttgart. Not without a reason one has decided to choose a symphony by Shostakovich. This live recording under the baton of the experienced conductor Eliahu Inbal shows the extraordinary level on which this orchestra operates after five years of existence. Shostakovich’s 11th Symphony focuses on the so-called “Petersburg Bloody Sunday”, which – according to the Julian calendar – took place on January 9, 1905. Just like the classical symphony the work has four movements that blend attacca into one another so as to create a continuous narrative flow. There’s no denying that the 11th Symphony is not a symphony in the classic sense but rather a symphonic poem or programme symphony. Shostakovich always needed an overriding subject for his compositions to express the “central idea” of his music. © SWR Classic
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Classical - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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A collection of well-known hits ("Schlager") made famous by singers like Joseph Schmidt, Richard Heuberger or Mischa Spoliansky, many of them composed for popular movies of that time. They maintained their popularity until nowadays and are performed on this album by the young rising star from Austria, the tenor Martin Miterrutzner, accompanied by the Deutsche Radio Philharmonie under the baton of Christoph Poppen, who has already established his reputation with original and innovative repertoire. Mitterrutzner is an extraordinary gifted tenor with a wide repertoire from Bach to Britten, whose voice is also perfectly equiped for an exquisite rendering of the emotive hits of the 1930’s. © SWR Classic
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Classical - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released March 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Classical - Released February 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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Gulda, a brilliant master of rhythm, uncompromising Bach interpreter and jazz musician, is in the best keeping with Chopin. Works by Chopin appear in Gulda’s concert programmes from quite early on. His secret in playing Chopin with so much vitality? It is the inimitable mix of rhythmic strictness, most cantabile tenderness and controlled outbursts of emotion. Although he would become one of 20th-century music’s most capricious rebels - as in love with the free spirits of jazz as with the living monuments of classical - pianist Friedrich Gulda (1930–2000) was born and bred in that most traditional of musical cities, Vienna. He studied theory with the late-Romanticist Joseph Marx at the Vienna Academy of Music, and he won the Geneva International Pianists' Competition at age sixteen, eventually earning a reputation for the rare blend of cogency and freedom within his interpretations of music from Bach, Mozart and Beethoven to Ravel and Debussy. His most notable recordings included both books of Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier and the complete sonatas and concertos of Beethoven (in 1954 and 1966). © SWR Classic
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Classical - Released February 12, 2021 | SWR Classic

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This is the fifth and final installment of the series dedicated to the complete recordings Friedrich Gulda made for the SWR and contains two recitals (live recordings) the Austrian pianist gave in Germany in 1959. All those who attended Gulda’s concerts report unanimously that a very special aura emanated from him, which was markedly stronger than the one conveyed by his recordings - the distinct impression that the music sounded as if performed for the first time in the here and now, as if he was surrounded by a musical cosmos he was coaxing the tones out of, making them audible on the grand piano (or the clavichord). Soon after a final chord Gulda would often bid farewell to the pearl-like tones he had created as if by magic and send them off into the universe with a subtle movement of his hand. This also happened in connection with the two Beethoven Sonatas presented here. The fact that Gulda cherished Beethoven’s Opus 110 throughout his life is by no means surprising for in this piece Beethoven really transcends all boundaries: the most heterogeneous elements are joined together to form an integrated whole – with a fugue at the end to show his reverence for Bach! © SWR Classic