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Rock - To be released December 10, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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International Pop - Released October 13, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released October 12, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released October 11, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released October 11, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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International Pop - Released October 8, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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International Pop - Released October 8, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released October 5, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released September 29, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released September 24, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released September 22, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released September 21, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released September 14, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 10, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
There has never been a better metaphor for Low's music than the way singer/co-founder/guitarist Alan Sparhawk recently defined distortion: "sending too much signal into something and then seeing what it does with it. Circuits, when [they] sense too much information, they start shaping the sound and kind of crushing down, that's what distortion is." On the Minnesota band's 13th album, the prevalent distortion sometimes feels less about listening to music and more like an out-of-body experience. (Don't be alarmed: Your speakers are not fuzzing out.) It's there in the glitchy pulse and churning storm of "I Can Wait," and in the vertigo-inducing feedback loop of "Hey." But it's also tempered with that most magical element of Low: the harmonies between Sparhawk and his longtime partner in music and life, Mimi Parker. They're up there with Emmylou Harris and Gram Parsons or Gillian Welch and David Rawlings. On "All Night," the music is warped as if melted in the sun but the harmonies remain as ethereal as ever. The couple pull off a terrific trick during the stark grandeur of opener "White Horses," where Sparhwak starts a line, Parker joins in, then he drops out while she sustains. It's spine-chillingly beautiful, even as the background ticking intensifies—like in a movie before a bomb goes off—for a minute and a half. (For the first few songs, such noises bleed from one song to the next, almost like it's one continuous thought.) Low's lyrics can sometimes be obtuse, but dreamy "Don't Walk Away" is so intimate it's almost unbearable. Sparhawk starts off like a '50s crooner (the Platters come to mind), then Parker prettily joins in: "I have slept beside you now/ For what seems a thousand years … Don't walk away/ I can not take any more/ Won this game/ I can not play any more." All the while, there's an indeterminable background whisper, like midnight pillow talk. (Take that song with the lyrics of "White Horses"—"The consequences of leaving/ Would be more cold if I should stay/ Though it's impossible to say, I know/ Still, white horses take us home"—and a story starts to come into focus.) The couple also each have stunning solo turns. "More" comes on in a fury, and Parker stands determined and femme in the face of fearsome guitar storm: "I gave more than what I should've lost/ I paid more than what it would've cost … la la la la ..." Meanwhile, Sparhawk's voice shoots like a beacon of light, so clear and unclouded, on "Days Like These," before the super-cloudy fuzz kicks in; the result is like some gorgeous, twisted hymn. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Rock - Released August 27, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Rock - Released August 26, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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International Pop - Released August 24, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released August 20, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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By the time The Bob’s Burgers Music Album, Vol. 2 appeared, the beloved animated show was enough of an institution that it could lean into its strengths -- inspired silliness and endearingly goofy vocal performances -- proudly. There's plenty of both on this collection, even though the set covers three seasons of music as opposed to the whopping six contained on The Bob's Burgers Music Album. Once again, the series' music gives each character and cast member time to shine. H. Jon Benjamin's Bob Belcher loves food and his family as ever on "Nothing Makes Me Happier" and "Regular Fries" (aka Nick Lowe's "Cruel to Be Kind"); Eugene Mirman's Gene remains gleefully uninhibited on "Sexy Little Tiger;" Dan Mintz's Tina is still an unabashed (if deadpan) romantic on "Briefest of Glances;" Kristen Schaal's Louise is a ball of vengeful fury on "Not the Forgiving Type;" and John Roberts' Linda continues to make every moment into a musical on songs like "Happy Birthday We Forgot." Even Kevin Kline's Mr. Fischoder gets a cameo on "Nothing Makes Me Happy." However, the real standout this time is Larry Murphy's Teddy, the sad sack with a huge heart who's also the Belchers' favorite customer. Murphy brings a charming karaoke exuberance to Teddy's version of "Beyond the Sea" and his duets with Roberts on "The Time of My Life" and "Street Life." The incredibly catchy little songs written by Loren Bouchard and the rest of the series' creative team, such as "Cat Training" and "Chunky Blast Offs," continue to tie the whole show together with an extra dose of fun. The biggest difference between the music from the show's earlier seasons and the songs on The Bob’s Burgers Music Album, Vol. 2 is that the music is even more integrated into Bob's Burgers' increasingly rich storytelling. The songs from the episode "Flu-ouise" cleverly hark back to The Wizard of Oz, while the tracks from "The Laser-inth" lovingly parody hard rock and heavy metal better than any animated show since Metalocalypse. Of course, it wouldn't be Bob's Burgers without some Boyz 4 Now, and the music from "Just One of the Boyz 4 Now 4 Now" sends up boy band pop and gender-swapping teen comedies with equal brilliance. While these soundtracks within a soundtrack are especially impressive, the collection also has plenty of smaller delights like the Bowie-esque "Watching You from a Distant Place," which shows off a totally different side of Roberts' vocal chops, and "Hot Pants Rain Dance," a piece of ecstatic disco that's all about letting go and having fun -- in other words, the whole point of Bob's Burgers. There may be nothing quite as iconic as "Electric Love" or "Bad Things Happen in the Bathroom," but The Bob’s Burgers Music Album, Vol. 2 is still a hugely entertaining showcase for the series' creativity as it approached its tenth season. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released August 19, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 17, 2021 | Sub Pop Records

Live albums have a tendency to be sterile, multi-tracked, overdubbed affairs that aren't a lot different than their studio equivalents. Low avoids that trap with One More Reason to Forget, which was recorded in a church using room microphones, thereby capturing the sound not only of the band but of the room -- an old church -- as well. One More Reason's track listing is a testament to Low's ability to change gears during a set. Sure, most of the songs are quite slow and pretty, but based on these seven tracks, they can hardly be called samey. From the purely pretty ("Venus") to the outright experimental and intense (the 17-minute "Do You Know How to Waltz?"), the band proves that it can more than make up for lack of tempo changes with a group of lovely, vibrant songs performed to perfection. © Josh Modell /TiVo

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