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Rock - To be released November 5, 2021 | Stax

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Rock - Released July 16, 2021 | Stax

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Rock - Released May 28, 2021 | Stax

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Pop - Released December 17, 2020 | Stax

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Rock - Released October 30, 2020 | Stax

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Rock - Released April 24, 2020 | Stax

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Pop - Released January 8, 2020 | Stax

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The day that Nathaniel Rateliff signed his contract with Stax will probably stick with him forever, considering the significance that the music label has for him. The Denver native, either under his own name or with his band The Night Sweats, has always been the perfect ambassador for sweltering, Southern soul music, much like that which was created in the legendary Memphis studio at the end of the 1960s. Yet with this album And It’s Still Alright, he seems to have switched entirely away from soul, instead aiming for a more introspective folk sound. Dedicated to his friend Richard Swift who had worked with him on his Night Sweats albums and who passed away in 2018, this solo album, his first for seven years, touches on themes of loss and perseverance. Rateliff’s voice is impressive in the way it plays on these nuance but manages to avoid becoming overly plaintive. “I think I always want to see hope in the darkness, and I like to try to share that… I always try to write from a perspective of trying to approach everything very honestly, even if it leaves me vulnerable. But overall, it’s almost like I’m a different character when I’m writing for myself. I think this album is a reminder that we all go through hardship, but regardless of the hardship everything ends up where it’s supposed to.” The recording process would also prove to be a highly emotional process as Nathaniel Rateliff returned to Richard Swift’s studio, National Freedom at Cottage Grove in Oregon, joined by two co-producers, Patrick Meese (Night Sweats drummer) and James Barone (Beach House drummer). Conceived with the additional help of Tom Hagerman (a violinist with DeVotchKa), Luke Mossman (guitarist from The Night Sweats), Elijah Thomson (a bassist from band Everest), Daniel Creamer (keyboards in Texas Gentlemen) and Eric Swanson (pedal-steel guitarist for Israel Nash), And It’s Still Alright sheds a new light on this soul singer that certain fans will not have expected. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Pop - Released January 8, 2020 | Stax

The day that Nathaniel Rateliff signed his contract with Stax will probably stick with him forever, considering the significance that the music label has for him. The Denver native, either under his own name or with his band The Night Sweats, has always been the perfect ambassador for sweltering, Southern soul music, much like that which was created in the legendary Memphis studio at the end of the 1960s. Yet with this album And It’s Still Alright, he seems to have switched entirely away from soul, instead aiming for a more introspective folk sound. Dedicated to his friend Richard Swift who had worked with him on his Night Sweats albums and who passed away in 2018, this solo album, his first for seven years, touches on themes of loss and perseverance. Rateliff’s voice is impressive in the way it plays on these nuance but manages to avoid becoming overly plaintive. “I think I always want to see hope in the darkness, and I like to try to share that… I always try to write from a perspective of trying to approach everything very honestly, even if it leaves me vulnerable. But overall, it’s almost like I’m a different character when I’m writing for myself. I think this album is a reminder that we all go through hardship, but regardless of the hardship everything ends up where it’s supposed to.” The recording process would also prove to be a highly emotional process as Nathaniel Rateliff returned to Richard Swift’s studio, National Freedom at Cottage Grove in Oregon, joined by two co-producers, Patrick Meese (Night Sweats drummer) and James Barone (Beach House drummer). Conceived with the additional help of Tom Hagerman (a violinist with DeVotchKa), Luke Mossman (guitarist from The Night Sweats), Elijah Thomson (a bassist from band Everest), Daniel Creamer (keyboards in Texas Gentlemen) and Eric Swanson (pedal-steel guitarist for Israel Nash), And It’s Still Alright sheds a new light on this soul singer that certain fans will not have expected. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 13, 2019 | Stax

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Rock - Released December 13, 2019 | Stax

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Rock - Released July 6, 2018 | Stax

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Soul - Released March 9, 2018 | Stax

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It’s hardly a coincidence that Nathaniel Rateliff is at Stax. With his band The Night Sweats, the native of Denver has become a true ambassador of this muggy southern soul as it was practised on the infamous Memphis label at the end of the sixties. With his instrumental virtuosity, the soul of his songs, the ardour of their interpretation and the preaching of his organ, Tearing at the Seams glorifies the spirit of a vast heritage ranging from Otis Redding to Van Morrison, through Booker T. and the MG’s, Ray Charles and Creedence Clearwater Revival. As can be expected, the rhythmic turbine goes at a million miles an hour, the brass are as incandescent as possible and the voice of Reteliff is a furious rattle that is completely his own. This gang does not care to look in the rearview mirror despite assuming a rather nostalgic sound. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released March 9, 2018 | Stax

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It’s hardly a coincidence that Nathaniel Rateliff is at Stax. With his band The Night Sweats, the native of Denver has become a true ambassador of this muggy southern soul as it was practised on the infamous Memphis label at the end of the sixties. With his instrumental virtuosity, the soul of his songs, the ardour of their interpretation and the preaching of his organ, Tearing at the Seams glorifies the spirit of a vast heritage ranging from Otis Redding to Van Morrison, through Booker T. and the MG’s, Ray Charles and Creedence Clearwater Revival. As can be expected, the rhythmic turbine goes at a million miles an hour, the brass are as incandescent as possible and the voice of Reteliff is a furious rattle that is completely his own. This gang does not care to look in the rearview mirror despite assuming a rather nostalgic sound. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Soul - Released March 9, 2018 | Stax

It’s hardly a coincidence that Nathaniel Rateliff is at Stax. With his band The Night Sweats, the native of Denver has become a true ambassador of this muggy southern soul as it was practised on the infamous Memphis label at the end of the sixties. With his instrumental virtuosity, the soul of his songs, the ardour of their interpretation and the preaching of his organ, Tearing at the Seams glorifies the spirit of a vast heritage ranging from Otis Redding to Van Morrison, through Booker T. and the MG’s, Ray Charles and Creedence Clearwater Revival. As can be expected, the rhythmic turbine goes at a million miles an hour, the brass are as incandescent as possible and the voice of Reteliff is a furious rattle that is completely his own. This gang does not care to look in the rearview mirror despite assuming a rather nostalgic sound. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Soul - Released March 9, 2018 | Stax

It’s hardly a coincidence that Nathaniel Rateliff is at Stax. With his band The Night Sweats, the native of Denver has become a true ambassador of this muggy southern soul as it was practised on the infamous Memphis label at the end of the sixties. With his instrumental virtuosity, the soul of his songs, the ardour of their interpretation and the preaching of his organ, Tearing at the Seams glorifies the spirit of a vast heritage ranging from Otis Redding to Van Morrison, through Booker T. and the MG’s, Ray Charles and Creedence Clearwater Revival. As can be expected, the rhythmic turbine goes at a million miles an hour, the brass are as incandescent as possible and the voice of Reteliff is a furious rattle that is completely his own. This gang does not care to look in the rearview mirror despite assuming a rather nostalgic sound. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Ambient/New Age - Released November 24, 2017 | Stax

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Soul - Released November 10, 2017 | Stax

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Rock - Released November 10, 2017 | Stax

Live at Red Rocks captures Colorado's Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats in 2016 in front of a hometown crowd, on the one year anniversary of the release of their self-titled gold-certified studio effort on Stax. Given their constant touring over most of two years, there is a distinct dearth of new material to draw on, so this effort is an attempt by the band and label to keep fresh meat on the shelves while awaiting a proper studio follow-up. For fans, none of this will likely matter. The band was hopped up and raring to go. Despite the fact that Red Rocks holds nearly 10,000 people, the Night Sweats deliver as if they were on a sweaty small club stage trying to prove themselves. The sound is clean enough to capture every strutting moment, but raw and immediate enough to keep the party atmosphere fluid. The esteemed Preservation Hall Jazz Band truly are special guests on this show. They appear on the three opening and final three cuts, bookending the show with a gritty, kinetic dimension that adds immeasurably to the Night Sweats' sound. This is especially true on the opening instrumental single "Failing Dirge," offered as a New Orleans funeral march played while the band took the stage and serving as an intro to a careening "I've Been Failing." All that brass pumps up the volume and adds a creative element to the chart, buoying Andy Wild's saxophone attack. The PHJB also shine on a nearly seven-minute read of "S.O.B." that gets a three-minute horn-blasted reprise, and the set closer, a cover of Sam Cooke's "Having a Party," is performed as a NOLA second-line as the band exited the venue. In between, Rateliff and crew wail through stuff from their gold album and their follow-up EP with seasoned confidence, yet find something new in them. Check the soul review-styled rave-up "Intro" that prefaces a stomping "Howling at Nothing." "I Need Never Get Old," with its organ and saxophone interplay, is revelatory. Elsewhere, Rateliff digs back into his solo singer/songwriter catalog for a couple of acoustic reads of "Early Spring Till" and "You Should've Seen the Other Guy," with guest Julie Davis on backing vocals -- she played and sang on the originals. "Shake" is offered with Rateliff giving the crowd a dance lesson. The song itself digs deep, with Luke Mossman and Rateliff engaging in spirited guitar interplay atop Mark Shusterman's swelling organ, and a deep trench groove laid down by Joseph Pope III's distorted bassline and drummer Patrick Meese's breakbeats. The live versions of these songs are clearly superior, the band takes risks that weren't possible before because they have been baptized in the fire of the road. In addition, they're infused with the audience's electric, raucous response encouraging them to go ever further. As a whole, Live at Red Rocks is the definitive album by and best introduction to Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Blues - Released August 25, 2017 | Stax

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Rock - Released January 1, 1970 | Stax

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