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Alternative & Indie - To be released February 25, 2022 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - To be released February 25, 2022 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - To be released January 28, 2022 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - To be released January 28, 2022 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - To be released December 10, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - To be released December 10, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 26, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 26, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 11, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 11, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 5, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 5, 2021 | Rough Trade

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 29, 2021 | Rough Trade

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On their 2012 debut Boys & Girls, Alabama Shakes never hid that they were creatures of the New South -- a band with old-fashioned blues, soul, gospel, and country in their blood but raised on modern rock. On their 2015 follow-up, Sound & Color, they free themselves from the vestiges of the past, let loose, and push themselves further in either direction. This could've resulted in a disjointed record pulling itself in two opposing directions, but the mess of Sound & Color is invigorating, likely because the album uses its title as a creed. Where Boys & Girls sometimes seemed a shade austere -- the band took pains to color within the lines, almost as if to convey their good taste -- Sound & Color bursts with oversaturated hues so vivid they seem almost tangible. Such deep digressions into shade and light accentuate both the group's roots and modernity, but the very fact that they chase after such bold, elastic sounds signals they're hardly a throwback. Plus, the group's attack is muscular here: there's a strong, boundless funk to "Don't Wanna Fight," but there's a similar power behind the slow-churning soul ballad "Gimme All Your Love." Often, Sound & Color takes flight when Alabama Shakes channel that energy into ever-shifting, liquid performances that almost feel like roots psychedelia, typified by "Future People" skipping off its tight Memphis groove with spooky harmonies and thudding fuzz. Such unaffected weird flourishes are evidence that Alabama Shakes are creatures of their time and place -- they play Southern soul-rock in an era where the past is indistinguishable from the present, and how the band interlaces the old and the new on Sound & Color feels startlingly fresh. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 29, 2021 | Rough Trade

On their 2012 debut Boys & Girls, Alabama Shakes never hid that they were creatures of the New South -- a band with old-fashioned blues, soul, gospel, and country in their blood but raised on modern rock. On their 2015 follow-up, Sound & Color, they free themselves from the vestiges of the past, let loose, and push themselves further in either direction. This could've resulted in a disjointed record pulling itself in two opposing directions, but the mess of Sound & Color is invigorating, likely because the album uses its title as a creed. Where Boys & Girls sometimes seemed a shade austere -- the band took pains to color within the lines, almost as if to convey their good taste -- Sound & Color bursts with oversaturated hues so vivid they seem almost tangible. Such deep digressions into shade and light accentuate both the group's roots and modernity, but the very fact that they chase after such bold, elastic sounds signals they're hardly a throwback. Plus, the group's attack is muscular here: there's a strong, boundless funk to "Don't Wanna Fight," but there's a similar power behind the slow-churning soul ballad "Gimme All Your Love." Often, Sound & Color takes flight when Alabama Shakes channel that energy into ever-shifting, liquid performances that almost feel like roots psychedelia, typified by "Future People" skipping off its tight Memphis groove with spooky harmonies and thudding fuzz. Such unaffected weird flourishes are evidence that Alabama Shakes are creatures of their time and place -- they play Southern soul-rock in an era where the past is indistinguishable from the present, and how the band interlaces the old and the new on Sound & Color feels startlingly fresh. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 22, 2021 | Rough Trade

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With Wide Awake! (2018) produced by Danger Mouse, Parquet Courts moved further than ever down the chaotic path of postpunk revival, inspired by the ghosts of Jonathan Richman, The Fall, The Feelies, Velvet Undergound and a bit of Pavement. Andrew Savage's band also had fun changing its vibe with salutary pop sparks and hip-swinging grooves... Produced by Rodaidh McDonald and John Parish (PJ Harvey), Sympathy For Life pushes the envelope ever further, taking in some Talking Heads-style mixes along the way (such as the groovy Plant Life). To concoct this seventh album, the Brooklynites first set about playing some long, long jams before pruning them, creating some finely calibrated songs. This record takes inspiration from the New York club scene of the seventies, notably the Loft, David Mancuso's cult informal club where Larry Levan, Frankie Knuckles and Louie Vega made their names. Parquet Courts also bears the imprint of Primal Scream's Screamadelica. In the end, there are some strong dance markers, but they never shift the band from a visceral rock vibe. On the contrary: Parquet Courts sets up its 100% garage rock philosophy right in the middle of the dancefloor. It's invigorating. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 22, 2021 | Rough Trade

With Wide Awake! (2018) produced by Danger Mouse, Parquet Courts moved further than ever down the chaotic path of postpunk revival, inspired by the ghosts of Jonathan Richman, The Fall, The Feelies, Velvet Undergound and a bit of Pavement. Andrew Savage's band also had fun changing its vibe with salutary pop sparks and hip-swinging grooves... Produced by Rodaidh McDonald and John Parish (PJ Harvey), Sympathy For Life pushes the envelope ever further, taking in some Talking Heads-style mixes along the way (such as the groovy Plant Life). To concoct this seventh album, the Brooklynites first set about playing some long, long jams before pruning them, creating some finely calibrated songs. This record takes inspiration from the New York club scene of the seventies, notably the Loft, David Mancuso's cult informal club where Larry Levan, Frankie Knuckles and Louie Vega made their names. Parquet Courts also bears the imprint of Primal Scream's Screamadelica. In the end, there are some strong dance markers, but they never shift the band from a visceral rock vibe. On the contrary: Parquet Courts sets up its 100% garage rock philosophy right in the middle of the dancefloor. It's invigorating. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz