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Rock - Released November 19, 2021 | RareNoiseRecords

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Jazz - Released November 19, 2021 | RareNoiseRecords

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Electronic - Released September 24, 2021 | RareNoiseRecords

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Rock - Released September 24, 2021 | RareNoiseRecords

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Electronic - Released July 16, 2021 | RareNoiseRecords

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Electronic - Released May 28, 2021 | RareNoiseRecords

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 14, 2021 | RareNoiseRecords

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Rock - Released March 26, 2021 | RareNoiseRecords

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Electronic - Released November 27, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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Classical - Released September 30, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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Japanese noise king Merzbow and progressive Hungarian power drummer Balázs Pándi have worked together in many settings since 2010. In 2013, they became a trio with the addition of Swedish sax powerhouse Mats Gustafsson on Cuts, a sprawling exercise in punishing free improv. Guitarist Thurston Moore joined them for 2015's Cuts of Guilt, Cuts Deeper and the concert offering Cuts Up, Cuts Out a year later. Sans Moore, the double-length Cuts Open marks the return of the trio. It was recorded live at Tokyo's premier avant room, Studio Gok. This outing consists of four long improvisations lasting between 17 and 24 minutes. Cuts Open arrives as a surprise. While it can be heard as an extension of what these musicians did previously, it reflects a different m.o. Rather than another fiercely overdriven set of skronky, assaultive exchanges, the trio project the desire to explore spatial dimensions with airiness, and adventurous textures with controlled dynamics. This new direction is evidenced amply on opener "I Went Down to Brother." Here, Pándi's exploratory drumming acts as catalyst, hub, and focus for what unfolds. He doesn't bridge ideas, he establishes and guides them with rolling gongs, cymbals, reverb, cracking floor toms, digital glitches, and organic hand percussion, while Gustafsson's flute drones through whole tones as Merzbow adds poignant squelches, feedback, and tempered bursts of noise that accent rather than swallow Pándi's assertive playing leading directional shifts. The piece sounds more like focused free jazz rather than improvised noise. "And We Went Home" is introduced by Gustafsson's tongue slaps on tenor as Merzbow adds crunchy, spiraling jet-and-wind sounds. Pándi begins rolling on low-tuned tom-toms, meeting their propulsion head on. The tension ratchets as the piece goes on, but it also dissipates cyclically, then expands to embody more expansive textures. "We Went Up to Mother" begins with extended silences punctuated only by Gustafsson breathing through and fingering the saxophone as Pándi rubs and grinds across his cymbals. Merzbow actually paints an unsettling ambient backdrop. As Gustafsson begins to assert the sax horn more directly, the percussive intensity gathers around him. The trio engage an immersive yet freely conversational restraint until the final four minutes, when all hell breaks loose. "He Locked the Door" delivers the expected free sonic assault of bleating, roaring, squalling saxes, crushing, ear-bleeding waves of electronics, and Pándi blasting across the kit with fury, adding unfettered power to this unholy, unforgiving sonic storm. An unidentified voice begins yelling in the background, signifying what instruments cannot express. The trio's encounter on Cuts Open is one of in-the-moment exchange and assemblage, not sonic confrontation. Fans will likely hear this as a statement of maturity and progress. That said, newcomers would do well to experience this outing first; it provides a compelling entryway to their more incendiary outings. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released June 26, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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Jazz - Released June 26, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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When Vince Guaraldi released the single "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" in 1962, jazz could still score hits on AM radio. The man swinging the drum kit on Guaraldi's smash was none other than the leader of this trio, Jerry Granelli. Further, that's him on all the pianist's Charlie Brown recordings and behind Mose Allison on Your Mind Is on Vacation. Granelli worked with the latter on and off for 40 years, and in a nearly 60-year career, he's played everything from bop to cool to free jazz to soul, blues and rock. This trio with New York pianist Jamie Saft, bassist Bradley Christopher Jones, is a going concern. Saft suggested this recording after a wily trio gig where some of these tunes were played and built upon. The set includes three Guaraldi tunes, five by Allison, the standard "Baby Please Don’t Go," and two originals co-written by Granelli and Jones that make for compelling contrast. As great as Guaraldi's original is, "Cast Your Fate to the Wind" has been covered often -- and badly (remember Mel Torme's stinker version?). These cats open it up and treat it like it was written yesterday, offering fresh harmonic, textural, and rhythmic possibilities. Saft's elliptical intro touches on soul-jazz before establishing the groove, and Jones uses his bow in the lower register in drone effect. Granelli's whispering cymbals are out of time but in the pocket and around the melody, framing it inside Saft's melding of Latin, gospel, and modern jazz threads. He introduces Allison's "Parchman Farm" with a Ramsey Lewis-styled rhythmic vamp. When Jones enters, he's bubbling dubwise underneath the changes, extrapolating harmonically while Granelli, spare and tasteful as always, gets between creating a rhythmic bridge and swings like mad. "Baby Please Don’t Go" gets turned inside-out (Saft even quotes from James Brown's "Sex Machine") but is no less accessible for its sense of adventure. Allison's "Young Man Blues" is introduced by Jones' deeply funky arco playing. Most of the jam feels like an intro with the trio trading fours in call-and-response, but they get plenty of discovery from the interplay. The final two cuts feature a stridently modernist "Your Mind Is on Vacation" that recalls what Allison did with it live, improvising on the changes and adding angular dissonance to its Latinized bluesy swing. Granelli rolls all over his tom-toms and ride cymbals, revealing just how many universes exist inside the tune. Finally, Guaraldi's "Christmas Time Is Here" is offered with Saft's elegant, heartfelt, modulated chords atop Jones' languid stride; he reaches deep in an emotionally stirring solo as Granelli dances around, under, and through his partners with brushes before Saft brings out the blues to close. While Plays the Music of Vince Guaraldi & Mose Allison is a trio offering that reflects the drummer's storied past, it does so in a manner that is utterly contemporary, creative, and ear opening. Get it. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Classical - Released April 24, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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Sophie Tassignon is a Belgian-born, Berlin-based vocalist, composer, and improviser whose place in the European avant-garde is well established. She leads her own group Zoshia, and is co-founder of several musical projects including Charlotte & Mr. Stone (with Simon Vincent), and Azolia (co-led by Susanne Folk). Mysteries Unfold is Tassignon's RareNoise debut; it marks the label's first album by a female artist. It is, for the most part, an outing for solo voice. While Tassignon is also credited with electronics, they are used quite sparingly, often as devices for layering and stacking her vocals. Consisting of four original compositions and four covers, Mysteries Unfold is not merely a collection of experimental vocal and production techniques, but a fully realized creative statement that showcases Tassignon's rather astonishing creativity and accessibility. Opener "Guibi Okayannie" by Russian composer Kim Yuliy Chesanovich commences with a wordless, layered harmonic drone. The singer stacks her vocals and emerges from the center with a Russian lyric (she speaks five languages and is currently learning Arabic) about a lover from the perspective of a female warrior riding over the Russian steppes. Tassignon expands her tonal ranges in a textured glossolalia that ratchets the intensity until it abruptly ends. Dolly Parton's "Jolene," is startling, as bird calls frame a skeletal contralto that delivers the passionate lyric with a slightly transposed melody. It's almost like a hymn though her soprano moan in the refrain is steeped in amorous emotion and drama. The original "Don't Be So Shy with Me," jumps time to capture the essence -- in modern cadence -- of popular cabaret vocalizing during the late 1920s and early '30s. Its fleet pace, sly lyrics, and five-part staggered harmony recall the great Comedian Harmonists, the most popular German vocal group of the era. "Descending Tide," another original, is framed by the sound of wind. The polyphonic lyric is layered in complex cadences, in an experimental -- yet commanding -- approach to Baroque singing. "Witches" is the most unlikely cover of a Cowboy Junkies' tune ever. Tassignon begins in her lower register before moving to the upper ranges of her alto and then the margin with her soprano. The lyric emerges from the middle with a lone backing voice, that is multiplied with each phrase. Still, Tassignon faithfully retains the song's vulnerability and emotion. Her "La Nuit," with its restrained, skittering, whispered, hiccuping backdrop layers a voice employing each strategy as she delivers her lyrics (in French) with eerie, Gothic overtones. It's haunted and beautiful. Tassignon treats us to an innovative reading of Antonio Vivaldi's "Cum Dederit" that mirrors the power and sacred passion in its polyphonic architecture. The title track original that closes the set uses the idea of medieval polyphony (albeit electronically altered) to create the backdrop for an elegant melody and seductive lyric that evoke Brecht and Weill. With its rigorous D.I.Y. approach to composition, production, and organic experimentation, Mysteries Unfold is a major work that showcases Tassignon as a master of control, expression, and vision. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 28, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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Jazz Fusion & Jazz Rock - Released February 28, 2020 | RareNoiseRecords

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 29, 2019 | RareNoiseRecords

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