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Chamber Music - To be released August 20, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Classical - To be released August 20, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Classical - To be released August 20, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Classical - To be released August 20, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

Booklet
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Classical - Released July 23, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

Booklet
Her playing may aptly be described as emotional and intense : displaying “amazing expressiveness and brilliance” (Westfalenpost) and “an empathy that touches one deep inside” (Märkische Allgemeine), Gerlint Böttcher fascinates her audiences in Europe, Asia, America and the Middle East. She makes solo appearances with such celebrated orchestras as Berlin’s Konzerthaus Orchestra, the South-West German Chamber Orchestra of Pforzheim, the Berlin Symphony, the Ryazan Philharmonic in Russia, the Philharmonic State Orchestra in Halle and the Brandenburg State Orchestra of Frankfurt an der Oder under such conductors as Sergey Oselkov, Heribert Beissel, Timo Handschuh and Nicholas Milton. The pianist is a regular performer at major festivals; in cooperation with the Bayreuth Festival, she has repeatedly played at Haus Wahnfried in Bayreuth. Many of the compositions that she has premiered were written expressly for her by composers of the first rank. Alongside the solo repertoire, which takes first place in her artistic life, she takes part in programmes of genuine rarities together with such partners as Echo Klassik prizewinners Bassiona Amorosa and actor Hans-Jürgen Schatz. © Haenssler Classic
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Chamber Music - Released July 23, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Swantje Asche-Tauscher belongs to that generation of young German violinists who win people over with their “expressive, sonorous playing”. At the age of 14, this talented artist appeared as a soloist in the Stuttgart Liederhalle. She had played at the Mozarteum Foundation in Salzburg, performs at festivals such as the Palermo Classica Festival, and is a lecturer at Strings in Motion. For the 2019/2020 season, Swantje Asche-Tauscher held the position of principal second violinist in the Tyrol Symphony Orchestra in Innsbruck. Markos Destefanos is one of the most promising classical guitarists of his generation. Eliot Fisk describes his playing as “charismatic and well-thought-out”, while praising his “powerful intellect”. In addition to winning national and international prizes, Markos Destefanos was awarded a scholarship by the foundation “Live Music Now”, as well as a performance scholarship by the Mozarteum University. He currently teaches at the State Music School of Upper Austria, and increasingly presents masterclasses at home and abroad. Furthermore, since 2018 he has been working as a scientific consultant for the successful music education platform “Tonebase”. © Haenssler Classic
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Classical - Released July 23, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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“One day during my studies, as I came in for my piano lesson, my teacher, Andrew Ball, asked if I knew the piece the previous student was working on. The student, still there, played the first few pages and I was instantly mesmerized. Some gestures seemed familiar, but the sonority and discourse were both alien and fascinating. It turned out to be Busoni’s Sonatina Seconda. I had heard about Busoni, mostly as an editor and arranger and had some vague knowledge of a work or two, but now a strong connection was suddenly established. Shortly after the lesson I took the score out of the library and set about to learn it. I find many musicians and audience members have a similar experience with Busoni’s music. They might at best give it some polite respect once they know a bit about his extraordinary personality, but rarely have an emotional connection to it. At the same time, I personally know several people who, either through exposure (mostly from myself), or through their own study, have slowly turned relative indifference into ardent admiration”. © Victor Nicoara/Haenssler Classic
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Chamber Music - Released July 23, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Classical - Released July 2, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

Booklet
When Johann Sebastian Bach assumed the position of Thomaskantor in Leipzig in 1723, he did so having previously affirmed to the City authorities by contractual guarantee that the music he was to compose for divine service in the pious mercantile city would not sound operatic. Another of the unalterable customs in Leipzig was that the high voice parts in church music should not be sung by women, a widely applied consequence drawn from the counsel of the Apostle Paul. [“Let your women keep silence in the churches: for it is not permitted unto them to speak” (1 Corinthians 14:34, KJV)] This album is the proof that Bach set his sacred works to music whose emotional and dramatic force stood comparison with the best operatic music of his day. © Haenssler Classic
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Chamber Music - Released July 2, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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"Recording an album is always an amazing adventure, this time even more so, and we are very grateful to everyone who made this album possible. But why was it so special? Firstly, because of the choice of program, of little known, exciting works, and secondly due to the fact that this project was overshadowed by the Covid-19 pandemic. Finally, there is the special significance that each of these works has attained precisely under the current circumstances. There is no doubt that the chronological sequence of the pieces tells a story documenting the development of musical styles over the course of the century in witness to contemporary events. But today, having experienced this music from the first lockdown through to the present day, the music itself and the sequencing have taken on a very significant relevance for us. From the melancholic, naïve and yet somewhat dreamy sounds of Lili Boulanger through the courage, tenderness and complexity of Grazyna Bacewicz, to Galina Ustvolskaya’s no-man’s land, where the absence of structured time reminds us of aimless days and hours without knowing what might happen the next day. And finally, Jennifer Higdon and her organized chaos that is nevertheless not hopeless, but a little rebellious, emotional, with deep insight into nature that seems to be a light and source of energy for humankind". (Louise Chisson and Tamara Atschba) © Haenssler Classic
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Classical - Released July 2, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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The musicians of the Berlin Baroque Soloists, who for the most part are members of the Berlin Philharmonic, are well known to Radek Baborák from his time as solo horn player of the orchestra from 2003 to 2010. “That is why the recording with the Berlin Baroque Soloists was not such an unusual project,” says Radek Baborák, “but it was a dream of mine to play something by Bach with this ensemble, which plays modern instruments. Some eight years ago, we played together in a program of works by Telemann and Zelenka. That was a thrilling time. What particularly appealed to me about my colleagues was that for all their concentration on the work in hand, they still had a relaxed approach. They were orientated towards historical performance practice, but without the dogmatic rigor that one sometimes finds in specialist ensembles”. To make his dream come true, and drawing on his encyclopedic knowledge of Bach, Radek Baborák trawled the composer’s works. He comments: “I am not a musicologist, in the first place I am a musician. When I find something I like, I use it for my purposes. If the material is robust – and it always is with Bach – it doesn’t matter what you play it on: the harpsichord, the organ, with strings, with choir, it will always sound good”. © Haenssler Classic
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Classical - Released July 2, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Although Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s first instrument was the piano, even as a child he revealed himself to be a highly gifted violinist. In this domain too he was encouraged by his father Leopold, well-known violin teacher in his own right and author of a violin method widely respected at the time. Even when Wolfgang was already 21, father Leopold reaffirmed his son’s violinistic talent, on 8 October 1777. "You don’t realize how good you are on the violin when you put your mind to it, playing with character, conviction and spirit, just as if you were the best violinist in Europe". That letter was written in the period between 1773 and 1779, when Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed numerous works requiring string soloists. From April to December of 1775 alone, the 19-year-old penned 5 violin concertos, in an unbroken process as it were. At that time Mozart was employed as concertmaster by the archbishop’s court in Salzburg, where instrumental music was highly prized. He had, however, previously got to know the Italian tradition and art of the violin in situ, frequenting students of the famous Giuseppe Tartini there, such as Pietro Nardini and Gaetano Pugnani. On several occasions during his three journeys to Italy, he also met the Bohemian composer Josef Myslivecek, who cultivated the violin concerto genre intensively. Synthesizing the influence of Italian masters with that of Joseph Haydn, Johann Christian Bach and French violinists, Mozart composed his own concertos, which sparkle with vitality but are at the same time both intimate and graceful. © Haenssler Classic
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Classical - Released July 2, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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How would have Bach composed if he had had access to modern instrumentarium: a violin with Tourte’s bow that produces a higher volume of sound, a trumpet with an entire chromatic scale or a contemporary grand piano? Would he be inspired by the art of virtuosos of today, such as the Leipzig ensemble of Collegium Musicum, as he was known to have composed for distinguished artists? Would he forgive pop or computer game composers for using his music? How would he judge changes in the key of pieces, which played a vital role in the intellectual and emotional rendition of music according to Baroque rules? Or else, would he adjust to the vibe of our epoch and make use of samples instead of real performers? In any case, he would definitely appreciate the interpretations by Jaroslaw Nadrzycki, Krzysztof Kaczka and L’Appasionata, a Verona-based chamber orchestra. The energy that these young musicians display while playing Bach’s pieces would certainly match the composer’s spirit. If we observe Bach’s portraits for which he would pose in a dignified wig as we listen to his grand music, we might think that Bach was a placid and serious man. Yet not once did his contemporaries have to cope with his fits of anger or turbulent character; on the contrary, he must have also been high-spirited and humorous, which we may deduce from his numerous pieces. © Haenssler Classic
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Classical - Released June 4, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Classical - Released May 28, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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All Tchaikovsky’s works for piano and orchestra exist, as do Bruckner’s symphonies for instance, in multiple versions. Traditionally, these works have been played without commentary, mostly in versions shortened in one way or another. The aim of this Edition is to present the unabridged versions of Tchaikovsky’s works for piano and orchestra as a box set. Sincere thanks are due to Dr. Polina Vaidman (Tchaikovsky Archive, Klin) and Prof. Lyudmila Korabelnikova, and to Dr. Marina Rakhmanova and Dr. Irina Medvedeva (Moscow). Extended conversations and teamwork in the archives and on original manuscripts have been a great help. “In the making of these recordings, we have followed the composer’s interpretative observations and annotations and his tempo markings, as shown in his manuscripts and his personal conducting scores“. (Andrej Hoteev) © Haenssler Classic
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Classical - Released May 7, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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“My commitment to the present new recording is not only important because of advanced ensemble techniques, but also because I believe that with a cast of soloists, as in the sixteen-part Hora est, transparency of the polyphonic movement can be achieved that is not so readily feasible with larger forces. A prerequisite here is the existence of ensemble capabilities among vocal soloists, as we also need it for earlier music. In any case, the vocal works which are also particularly interesting to me among those Mendelssohn composed for the Sing-Akademie are those of stylistically ambiguous definition, in which the composer, inspired by the example of the old masters, looks for – and finds – his own path. Our conception of being able to cast soloists from a chorus, as in the Te Deum, is also influenced by this model“. (Frieder Bernius) © Haenssler Classic
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Classical - Released April 16, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Classical - Released April 16, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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Brilinsky’s intention is "not to emphasize technique, but rather sound, and above all the magnificent music must be paramount. Polyphonic like Bach, Ysaÿe also gives a specific stylistic portrait of each of the six violinists the sonatas were composed for". Ysaÿe knew them all personally; several were associated with the Vienna Philharmonic, as he himself was, thus bringing together different European schools of violin playing. Maxim Brilinsky does not, however, approach all the great technical demands, the subtleties and individual portraits, solely in consideration of the expressive virtuosity of their dedicatees. Further highlighting association with the Vienna school, Brilinsky plays a violin made in 1862 by the Vienna luthier Gabriel Lemböck, who was also responsible for string instruments of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, founded in 1842. © Haenssler Classic
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Classical - Released April 16, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC

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“Masterpieces are irreplaceable with their timelessness. I still clearly remember when, for the first time, I heard a couple of bars in the last movement of Beethoven’s Opus 109 – it was about 20 years ago and I felt deeply touched and captured at that moment... It was something truly indescribable to me. I have always believed that I should only record pieces of music to which I feel strongly attached. I felt that this composition would grow as if it were an extension of my own musical language. It is now very clear to me that Opus 109 will always be the music to accompany me through all the ups and downs of life, and the same is also true for Opus 111. It has to be admitted that I totally fell in love with the variations to be found in Opus 111. I desperately wanted to be part of that particular world encompassed by the fragile and sublime colors which are to be found between the “pp and ppp (“very quiet” and “extremely quiet”) parts of the work, which permeate the whole special atmosphere. It seems as if one is being driven towards infinity - somehow it might even take one to a sublime place without conflicts, pain and evil“ (Haiou Zhang) © Haenssler Classic
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Classical - Released March 19, 2021 | haenssler CLASSIC