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Rock - Released October 30, 2020 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released October 20, 2020 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released October 15, 2020 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released October 1, 2020 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released September 24, 2020 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released September 9, 2020 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released July 10, 2020 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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The 50th-anniversary celebrations for The Grateful Dead are well underway. Reaching the height of their fame in the United States, the Dead were the embodiment of San Francisco’s proto-hippy sound in the ‘60s and are still regarded by many as the last legendary American band. They often played alongside Big Brother & The Holding Cie at the Acid Test parties organised by The Merry Pranksters’, where mass usage of LSD – which was still legal in California – was the name of the game. Following their purely psychedelic debut album, the band then released the experimental Anthem of the Sun and the trippy but expensive to produce Aoxomoxoa, before changing course completely and turning to country-folk music. Indeed, by 1970 the hippie movement was in its twilight years. Inspired by Crosby, Stills and Nash & Young, the band’s iconic guitarist Jerry Garcia decided to play in a different register and toned down his hypnotic guitar riffs, reviving his bluegrass roots and playing the pedal steel guitar instead. The band had to record their album Workingman’s Dead during some lengthy jam sessions at the Pacific High Recording Studio in San Francisco in a total of just nine days due to their financial situation. In a clever mix of frantic beats such as New Speedway Boogie and shorter folk and country tracks like Uncle John’s Band, the album thrills some and confuses others. Likewise, its companion album American Beauty, which is considered their greatest album, followed suit a few months later. To celebrate its 50th anniversary this 70’s classic has been remastered into two CDs and features live, previously unreleased material from a concert in the Capitol Theatre, New York, in 1970 – that’s more than enough for their diehard fans – the Deadheads – to feast on! © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released July 1, 2020 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released November 22, 2019 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released September 27, 2019 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released June 7, 2019 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

Nearly synonymous with the term "psychedelic," the Grateful Dead reached their true peak of psychedelia on their third album, 1969's Aoxomoxoa. The band had already begun work on an initial recording of the album when they gained access to the new technology of 16-track recording, doubling the number of individual tracks they'd used on their last album. Fueled by acid and keeping pace with the quickly changing hippie subculture of the late '60s, the band went wild with this newfound sonic freedom. The exploratory jamming and rough-edged blues-rock of their live shows were ornamented with overdubbed choirs, electronic sound effects, and layers of processed vocal harmonies. Rudimentary experimental production took the band's already-trippy approach and amplified it with generously applied effects and jarring edits. In their most straightforward songs, Aoxomoxoa's ambitious production isn't as noticeable. Gelatinous rockers like "Cosmic Charlie" and "St. Stephen" showcase Jerry Garcia's spindly guitar leads and the band's dusty vocal harmonies clearly before detouring into wild studio experiments. Though the studio mix of "China Cat Sunflower" sounds like the different instruments are floating in space, trying to connect from distant individual planets, the core of the song still comes through, and this number would become a live favorite for the rest of the band's lengthy run. This was the first album where the band brought on lyricist Robert Hunter, who would go on to pen some of the band's best-loved lyrics. The early glimpses of the Hunter/Garcia partnership that come through on the bluegrass-inflected "Dupree's Diamond Blues" or the mellow ballad "Rosemary" foreshadowed the complete shift to gentle Americana the band would make on their next studio outing, 1970's masterful Workingman's Dead. The overly experimental production could sometimes obscure the musical ideas, as distorted vocals clashed with acoustic instruments or multiple drum tracks ping-ponged across the stereo field. The eight-minute epic "What's Become of the Baby" was the most glaring example of the album's ungrounded production aesthetic, reaching an almost musique concrète level of weirdness with random electronic sounds and choppy effects swarming on Garcia's isolated vocal tracks. Aoxomoxoa was so out there that the band themselves had second thoughts, returning in 1971 to remix the album in full. The new mix dialed back some of the wilder moments and added clarity, but these eight songs would remain the most adventurous, confusing, and over-the-top productions the band would record. Aoxomoxoa is a prime example of the Grateful Dead's difficult relationship with the recording studio, which would take different forms throughout their long, strange trip. Even leaning wholeheartedly into all the available bells and whistles, the band couldn't quite capture with Aoxomoxoa the depths of cosmic wonder they tapped into organically every time they took the stage. Not without its excellent moments, the album is more a document of late-'60s studio experimentation than a huge step in any sustained path for the band. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 7, 2018 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released September 7, 2018 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released July 13, 2018 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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50 years ago, the psychedelic movement emerged, hairs started growing at will, organic food was topical and fashion trends in the United States were in no way controlled by Chanel or the others. Right in the midst of this movement, there was Grateful Dead. Proper hippies with electric guitars, soaked in hallucinogenic drugs, blossoming in an exuberant counterculture, and whose cornerstone was a psychedelic mix of musical genres. Blues, rock, country and sixties pop, a proper hotchpotch that hasn’t gone any bad in half a century. The Dead are still partying and releasing a remastered version of Anthem Of The Sun (50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition), their second album from 1968. The one that introduced their second drummer Mickey Hart. At that time, the band featured Jerry Garcia, Bob Weir, Ron McKernan, Phil Lesh and Bill Kreutzmann. The album includes two versions of the original Anthem of the Sun, with titles from 1968 as well as better-known mixes from 1961, remastered by David Glasser. It’s a rather rare occurrence for an album to combine several studio and live recordings of each song. It is without a doubt Grateful Dead’s most interesting and exciting work to listen to. With some titles exceeding the ten-minute mark, recording medleys and a previously unreleased recording of their concert at Winterland on October 22nd, 1967, this album truly feels like a landmark. New Potato Caboose, It Hurts Me Too, That's It For The Other One, the versions are clearly different. Bill Kreutzmann described the album with these words: “It was easily our most experimental record, it was ground-breaking in its time and it remains a psychedelic listening experience to this day.” A whole era is brought back to life and we’d love to be back 50 years to witness the spectacle of Grateful Dead on stage. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
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Rock - Released July 13, 2018 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released March 23, 2018 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released March 23, 2018 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released November 24, 2017 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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The four albums gathered here were released by the band's own label, Grateful Dead Records: Wake of the Flood (1973), From the Mars Hotel (1974), Blues for Allah (1975) and the much-maligned live compilation, Steal Your Face (1976). The three studio albums, even if they suggest songs really different from what they have become later, are enjoyable. This is the album "live" that benefits most from the remastering, which it well deserved.
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Rock - Released November 24, 2017 | Grateful Dead - Rhino

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Rock - Released August 4, 2017 | Grateful Dead - Rhino