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Film Soundtracks - Released September 9, 2003 | AAL - BMG Heritage

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Jazz - Released August 18, 2003 | AAL - BMG Heritage

Louis Armstrong's later work in the '30s, '40s, and beyond has usually taken a critical backseat to his earlier material recorded with the Hot Fives and Hot Sevens in the '20s. It could be argued, however, that his later work, while no longer revolutionary, was more accessible to the general public who appreciated his vocals as much as his trumpet playing. Platinum and Gold Collection reaches back into the Bluebird vault to collect a sampling of Armstrong's music from two separate periods: the first, orchestra recordings dating back to 1933, represented by gems like "I've Got the World on a String," and the second, smaller group recordings from 1946-47, featuring favorites like "Pennies From Heaven." Most of the cuts equally balance Armstrong's singing and playing, and the two time periods blend well. If the latter material gets a slight nod it's because Satchmo gets to match musical wits with the likes of pianist Billy Strayhorn, alto Johnny Hodges, and trombonist Jack Teagarden. There's a fine take on Maceo Pinkard's "Sugar," kicking off with a lovely trumpet solo, and a winning version of "Ain't Misbehavin'" with Armstrong's trademark vocal treatment. Platinum and Gold Collection offers a good one-stop collection to check out two productive periods for Armstrong, and also a good place to trace the steps of an artist who kept making changes to keep his sound fresh. © Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr. /TiVo
CD£14.49

Jazz - Released June 26, 2003 | AAL - BMG Heritage

Although Glenn Miller & His Orchestra get first billing on this two-CD set, 25 of the 35 selections are features for the Andrews Sisters. The music is taken from the earliest Glenn Miller Chesterfield Broadcasts, shows that had the always-cheerful Andrews Sisters as the regular guests. After March 1940, it was decided that Miller (whose band had become the most popular in the country) was too much of a big name to have to share his show with anyone. But before that happened, Miller's band often accompanied the Andrews Sisters, who are heard in prime form on such numbers as "Begin the Beguine," "Bei Mir Bust Du Schon," "Beer Barrel Polka," "Say 'Si Si,'" and "South of the Border." Of the ten Miller songs, four have vocals by Ray Eberle, Tex Beneke, and/or Marion Hutton, with the only instrumentals being "In the Mood," "Tuxedo Junction," "One O'Clock Jump," "Little Brown Jug," "Runnin' Wild," and "Farewell Blues." Clyde Hurley has some hot trumpet solos along the way, but this set is primarily recommended to fans of the Andrews Sisters. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released June 10, 2003 | AAL - BMG Heritage

Eartha Kitt's entry in RCA/BMG Heritage's Platinum & Gold series presents songs from Kitt's five albums and numerous singles she recorded for RCA between 1952 and 1957. Three songs, including the sultry "I Want to Be Evil," are taken from 1953's That Bad Eartha, three are from 1955's Down to Eartha, including the quite nasty "The Heel," one is from 1956's Thursday's Child, three are from her 1957 album of W.C. Handy tunes called St. Louis Blues, and there are two singles: "Dinner for One, James" and the incredibly cool "Santa Baby," which hit number four on the charts and is a contender for the best Christmas song ever. Kitt doesn't possess one of the world's best voices, but what she does have is style -- miles and miles of ferocity and sly style. There are other collections of her work from this period that are more comprehensive (1999's Purr-Fect: Greatest Hits) or only slightly different (RCA's Heavenly Eartha from 2002, which shares many tracks), and there is even a two-fer of That Bad Eartha and Down to Eartha. Any of them would be a worthwhile addition to your collection. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Jazz - Released February 20, 2003 | AAL - BMG Heritage