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R&B - Released October 30, 2015 | eOne Music

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Following the release of Where It All Begins, her sixth album, as well as subsequent appearances on recordings by a few other artists, Lalah Hathaway received some long overdue recognition. A live recording with Snarky Puppy -- a stupefying update of Brenda Russell's "It's Something," a song she previously covered on her 1990 debut -- won the 2014 Grammy for Best R&B Performance. The following year, due to her lead on Robert Glasper Experiment's interpretation of Stevie Wonder's "Jesus Children of America," she accepted a Grammy for Best Traditional R&B Performance. The second award could not have been too dusty on April 21, 2015, the night Hathaway and her band played West Hollywood's Troubadour, where her father Donny recorded his 1972-released set of the same title. (Clever touch: copies of the albums can be placed beside one another to make it appear as if two generations of soul royalty are singing to one another.) Like her father's album, Lalah's includes a performance of "Little Ghetto Boy," and the faithful version here opens a set that easily bounces from point to point in her discography. Among the standouts are the consecutive "Baby Don't Cry" and "I'm Coming Back," both originally recorded for Lalah Hathaway, and an 11-minute version of Luther Vandross' "Forever, for Always, for Love" that best displays the increased depth and richness of Hathaway's voice. The singer also does well by Anita Baker with a fine version of the Top Five R&B classic "Angel," a song she has performed both for and with Baker. Topped off with a pair of new, high-quality studio cuts that help fill the compact disc edition to capacity, this is essential for Hathaway fans. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 2008 | Stax

Had Lalah Hathaway's third and fourth solo albums been separated by a gap in time equal to the one between her second and third, Self Portrait would not have come out until 2014. But it arrived six years earlier, in time for her to connect with the rejuvenated Stax label, home of Angie Stone. The set reunites Hathaway with Rex Rideout, the producer/songwriter who worked with the singer on "Forever, for Always, for Love," the title cut of the Luther Vandross tribute album that appeared in 2004. Rideout is the primary collaborator, with his input on half of the songs, while kindred spirits Rahsaan Patterson and Sandra St. Victor also contribute to a handful of tracks. More mellow and unified than 2004's Outrun the Sky, the album maintains a steady flow, whether the backdrops feature midtempo dance rhythms and horns, deep basslines and finger snaps, or acoustic guitars and glistening keyboards. Nothing is bound to jump out of the speakers and pull you around the room, but there's an unshakable lingering effect with nearly every song. More than anything, the album helps bring back the art of the subtly seductive slow jam, despite the lyrical range, which covers personal issues almost as frequently as relationships. Slowest and most stunning is the closer, "Tragic Inevitability," co-produced with Manuel Hugas, Wiboud Burkens, and Anthony Jeffries; it's a breakup song ("It hurts me so/And I will not be consoled"), but no one will be doing any kind of separating while the song is within earshot. In the liners, check the random jabs at vocalists who, unlike Hathaway herself, require studio enhancements: "Pitch is the new black"; "Auto tune this!" She uses some effects of her own here, but they are used for effect, not as a corrective device. In total control of her voice at all times, she has never been prone to showing off for the sake of it, so it is easy to not fully appreciate just how exceptional she is. © Andy Kellman /TiVo

Soul - Released October 5, 2004 | Mesa BlueMoon Recordings

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Few mainstream artists can keep the lazy release schedule Don Hathaway's daughter does and retain a strong fan base. It's been a whole decade since Lalah Hathaway released one of her own albums and half that long since she joined Joe Sample for The Song Lives On. It's her warm voice, smooth delivery, and allegiance to fad-free R&B that keeps the faithful patiently waiting. Delivering on all counts, Outrun the Sky is a fan's dream and the singer's best showcase since her debut. While The Song Lives On was more ambitious and in turn brought more fans, Outrun the Sky is a better showcase. Not only does Hathaway cover a wider spectrum of tones and moods but she also producers and writes most of the highlights of the album. Her stream-of-consciousness lyrics for the title track give a more personal picture of the artist and paint her as an approachable dreamer who's as unsure as anyone. Hathaway's inspired writing is responsible for many of the other warm and reflective winners but it's the closing "Boston" that best illustrates how this husky voiced siren can conjure up a cosmopolitan song and deliver it with heart. Including her smoky take on Luther Vandross' "Forever, for Always, for Love" from the Forever, for Always, for Luther tribute is the icing on this cool cake. The ballad-heavy album still has its fair share of grooves that are rooted in R&B but the overall easy temperament isn't going to alienate any of Hathaway's smooth jazz converts. Nice to have her back; here's to a shorter wait next time. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 1990 | Virgin Records

When Lalah Hathaway's self-titled debut album came out in 1990, there was reason to believe that she might evolve into one of the top female R&B singers of the 1990s. Donny Hathaway's daughter certainly had a lot going for her -- not only a big vocal range, but also plenty of charisma, passion, and charm to go with it. The material on this CD ranges from excellent to routine, depending on who's writing and/or producing a particular song. Hathaway doesn't always have fantastic material to work with, but when she does, the results are quite memorable. The producers/songwriters who really do Hathaway justice include Angela Winbush on "Baby, Don't Cry" and "I Gotta Move On," and Andre Fisher on "Smile" and "Somethin'." While those selections come across as personal, Hathaway slips into a routine, less-than-memorable urban contemporary grind thanks to Chuckii Booker on "Sentimental," and Craig T. Cooper on "Obvious" and "U-Godit Gowin On." Again, not everything on the album is a gem. But when Hathaway had strong material to work with, it was clear that she had a lot of potential. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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R&B - Released October 20, 2017 | Hathaway Entertainment

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R&B - Released January 1, 2010 | Stax

The artwork for Where It All Begins, Lalah Hathaway's second Stax album, features a striking collage of her father Donny’s album covers, with Lalah cleverly inserted in place of her father on most of them. In addition to family photos scattered throughout the booklet, Lalah maintains a looking-back theme with a naturally heart-rending version of her father’s “You Were Meant for Me,” the original of which was issued as a single a few months prior to his tragic passing. Lalah also reaches back 20 years for a hushed but powerful remake of her own “I’m Coming Back,” her fourth charting single, first released in 1991. Otherwise, Where It All Begins picks up where 2008’s Self Portrait left off, though the pop-R&B-type moves -- buzzing synthesizers, harder beats -- are a little more pronounced. “If You Want To,” a gleaming disco-funk track co-written by Rahsaan Patterson, is the best of that lot; the remainder of the album’s highlights are relatively subdued, led by the gliding, atmospheric title track -- a stunning throwback to lyrically inward, sonically otherworldly soul-jazz of the ‘70s. There’s also a pleasant surprise in the form of “Wrong Way,” an uplifting number driven by bright acoustic guitar and a big chorus. It could easily fit into the playlist of a mature-rock radio station. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 1994 | Virgin Records

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R&B - Released June 27, 2018 | Hathaway Entertainment

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R&B - Released August 7, 2015 | eOne Music

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R&B - Released August 7, 2015 | eOne Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released August 27, 2021 | Hillman Grad - Def Jam PS

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 24, 2016 | Columbia

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R&B - Released January 20, 2016 | eOne Music

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R&B - Released January 1, 2011 | Stax

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Soul - Released November 5, 2013 | Hathaway Entertainment

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R&B - Released September 14, 2018 | Hathaway Entertainment

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Film Soundtracks - Released August 27, 2021 | Hillman Grad - Def Jam PS