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R&B - Released April 20, 2005 | Bad Boy Records

Faith Evans had written songs for a variety of new jack and hip-hop artists (including Mary J. Blige, Al B. Sure!, Pebbles, and Christopher Williams) before releasing her first album, Faith. The record proves that she is as powerful in the spotlight as she is behind the scenes. Evans builds on a basic, hip-hop-influenced funk, alternating between simmering grooves and sultry ballads. Faith does have a couple of dull spots, but the album is a first-class debut. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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R&B - Released April 20, 2005 | Bad Boy Records

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R&B - Released May 19, 2017 | Rhino

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R&B - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

The first Faith Evans album without the Bad Boy logo on the sleeve and the word "faith" in the title, The First Lady thankfully offers nothing else in the way of a shake-up. The wait between 2001's Faithfully and this 2005 release was easily the longest in Evans' career. If there was any creative block during the time away, it doesn't show. In fact, The First Lady proves that she only gets better with time, as she goes through more ups and downs and continues to absorb her inspirations. At less than an hour in running time, it's her shortest album to date, which also helps make it her tightest. Where her first three albums are too lengthy, often bogged down with some lukewarm ballads, The First Lady is terrifically balanced in its distribution of club tracks, midtempo grooves, and slow jams -- with a knowing, timely homage to the late Lyn Collins thrown effectively into the mix -- and its tactful sequencing should give a lot of skip and delete buttons a break. Whatever dip in quality that transpires during the latter half of the album has more to do with the first half's excellence and numerous dimensions, including the punchy Neptunes production "Goin' Out," the sparkling "I Don't Need It," the uplifting "Again" (a good match with Fantasia's similarly affirming "Baby Mama"), and "Stop n Go" -- a gorgeous ballad with a devastating chorus. Evans, as always, does the bulk of the songwriting and some of the production with some key help. Jermaine Dupri, Chucky Thompson, Mario Winans, and the ubiquitous Bryan-Michael Cox also assist, but Carvin "Ransum" Haggins and Ivan "Orthodox" Barias deserve a lot of credit for their work on half of the songs. The First Lady is as well-rounded as an R&B album gets, regardless of the age it's part of. Like Teedra Moses' neglected Complex Simplicity, it smartly incorporates throwback aspects into state-of-the-art pop-soul. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released April 20, 2005 | Bad Boy Records

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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

Faith Evans' first Christmas album, appropriately titled A Faithful Christmas, is very uneven and hastily thrown together. Within the span of 40 minutes, Evans switches between songs that sound thoroughly modern and songs that attempt to sound as if they were made decades ago, and she covers both secular and religious material, in addition to offering some originals that are spirited but bland. There are a couple strange moves, like a rendition of "O Come All Ye Faithful" with modern production tricks (like those water droplet sounds loved by R. Kelly and many others), which is a little jarring and very ineffective. Beyond an expected round of favorites covered here (including "Santa Baby," "Merry Christmas Baby," "Christmas Song," and "This Christmas"), a pleasant surprise is a straightforward version of "The Day That Love Began," a song recorded by both Stevie Wonder (1967) and Smokey Robinson & the Miracles (1970). Despite its faults, Evans' fans will likely enjoy this and rejoice in being able to hear seasonal music from one of their favorite artists. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 29, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released November 6, 2012 | eOne Music

In 2012, Faith Evans teamed with fellow veteran R&B singers Monifah ("Touch It"), Nicci Gilbert (Brownstone), Syleena Johnson (Kanye West's "All Fall Down"), and Keke Wyatt ("Nothing in This World") for the TV One reality program R&B Divas. The show entailed the making of an album to benefit the Whitney E. Houston Academy. This is that album, a compilation featuring all the singers together and apart with a large cast of songwriters and producers. The results, perhaps unsurprisingly, are scattered. The whole group is together for only two songs: the triumphant, empowering "Lovin' Me" and the self-explanatory "Sisterfriend." Five songs, highlighted by "Too High for Love," are basically Evans solo showcases that aren't too distanced stylistically from her 2010 album. She goes back with an odd-sounding live version of "Soon as I Get Home" that includes her lead clashing with her not-live background vocals. On a cover of Cyndi Lauper's "True Colors," Evans is assisted not by her fellow cast members but by Fantasia and Kelly Price (whose "Jesus Loves" closes the set). It's not bound to please devout fans of Evans' co-stars since each one of those singers gets the spotlight for one song. Whether due to personal or contractual reasons, Evans is the only diva whose image appears in the disc's presentation. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released August 21, 2012 | eOne Music

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Soul - Released November 24, 2014 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

"We 'bout to make it hot for the summer, baby!," proclaims Missy Elliott at the beginning of Incomparable lead single "I Deserve It," which was officially released in late August. It was evidently intended for earlier impact, reached none of Billboard's charts, and didn't exactly scorch anyway. While those signs were all bad, Faith Evans' sixth proper album, which followed three months later, comfortably surpasses everything she released after 2005's The First Lady. Perhaps due to a combination of her reality television work, maturity, and the establishment of her own label, Evans sounds freer and more direct than ever, whether she's dealing with interpersonal or intrapersonal matters. The downside to that confidence and creative control is that the songs often sound disjointed from one another. These 16 cuts are more like a playlist of mostly good-to-great selections than a focused album; an '80s throwback trails a '60s throwback, and later, a traditional gospel-soul testimonial leads into a slick synthesizer groove. Scattered as it is, the album offers a lot to like. Best of all is the title track, produced by Brian Alexander Morgan -- right, the one who was behind SWV's "Weak" -- which rubberizes D Train's electro-funk classic "You're the One for Me" and is just as effective as Evans' past nods to Chic and the Jones Girls. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

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R&B - Released April 3, 2001 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released March 12, 2021 | Heritage Music Groups

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R&B - Released May 19, 2017 | Rhino

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R&B - Released August 12, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

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R&B - Released June 24, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

The wife of Notorious B.I.G., Faith Evans gets remixes from Sean "Puffy" Combs and Ali Shaheed Muhammad on this soul single for Arista. © John Bush /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 15, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Released October 5, 2010 | eOne Music

The First Lady was one of Faith Evans' strongest albums, not just creatively but commercially. It topped Billboard’s R&B Albums chart, came within one spot of topping the Billboard 200, and won Evans a Soul Train award for best female R&B/soul album. It was her lone release for Capitol, and this, her fifth proper studio album, is her first for the independent E One label. Several past collaborators, including Chucky Thompson, Brad Todd, and Carvin & Ivan are on-board, as are Mike City and Salaam Remi. Even so, this round of songs is merely decent -- pleasant but not penetrating -- and does not pack the lasting value boasted by Evans' most recent work. While the album is nearly an hour in length, the number of references to past recordings, combined with a carousel full of guest artists (including Snoop Dogg, Redman, Keyshia Cole, Raekwon, and Kelly Price) suggests a shortage of fresh ideas. There are a few standouts, including the disco throwback “Party,” the Toni Braxton-worthy breakup ballad (albeit with heavier bottom) “Gone Already,” and the midtempo boogie track “Sunshine” (which carries a subtle, smooth groove touch resembling that of Michael Wycoff's “Looking Up to You”). © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released June 24, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

The wife of Notorious B.I.G., Faith Evans gets remixes from Sean "Puffy" Combs and Ali Shaheed Muhammad on this soul single for Arista. © John Bush /TiVo
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Miscellaneous - Released December 26, 2019 | Indie Art Music