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Children - Released May 14, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released May 7, 2021 | Rhino

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New Order's third consecutive live album since the release of their 2015 studio album Music Complete, Education Entertainment Recreation was recorded at their only U.K. concert in 2018, which took place at London's Alexandra Palace. While their previous release, 2019's ∑(No,12k,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So it goes.., was an unconventional set of mostly deep cuts that featured a 12-piece synth ensemble, this one is a lot closer to the more straightforward NOMC15. The main difference is that Education Entertainment Recreation only has a pair of songs from Music Complete (plus "Tutti Frutti" on the Blu-ray edition), and two more tracks overall, which means there's more room for hits and Joy Division tunes. "Disorder" and "Sub-culture" have fortunately remained in the repertoire since the last release, "Love Vigilantes" makes a welcome appearance, and it's hard to go wrong with standbys like "Your Silent Face," a gleefully audience-assisted "Bizarre Love Triangle," "Crystal," and the "Street Hassle"-referencing arrangement of "Temptation." The trio of Joy Division songs concluding the set, naturally finishing with "Love Will Tear Us Apart," feels like a goodwill gesture to the audience, but the band generally seem more committed to the New Order material. Essentially, this is all well-trodden territory for New Order and their fans, but for anyone who has an emotional connection to their music, it's still a potent reminder of how vital and life-affirming their best songs are. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Children - Released May 7, 2021 | Rhino

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Progressive Rock - Released April 30, 2021 | Rhino

Pet Shop Boys followed the release of 1993's Very (their only album to top the U.K. charts) with their third world tour, which brought them to Australia, Singapore, and Latin America for the first time. A particularly electric concert in Rio de Janeiro was filmed by a local television crew and released on VHS and Laserdisc as Discovery: Live in Rio in 1995. Inspired by the vibrancy of New York City nightlife, the duo focused the tour on uptempo dance songs, and embraced spontaneity more than they did on their earlier tours, which were more staged and theatrical. They're joined on-stage by a quartet of free-spirited dancers, a pair of percussionists, and charismatic backing singer Katie Kissoon. The energy is more than reciprocated by the audience, who scream, cheer, and sing along throughout the entire show. The arrangements totally embrace the type of hyper-glitzy Euro-dance which was everywhere at the time, and older singles like "Always on My Mind" and "Domino Dancing" sound absolutely huge. Early B-side "Paninaro" is given a reggae-disco remake, sounding even more charged-up than the version released as a single around the same time as Discovery. Elsewhere, PSB nod to several then-current dance hits -- the crowd goes wild when "One in a Million" slides into Culture Beat's "Mr. Vain," as well as the medley of "Left to My Own Devices" and Corona's glorious "Rhythm of the Night." They also perform Blur's cheeky alt-dance classic "Girls & Boys," which they had previously remixed, fully transforming an already PSB-indebted song into one of their own. Wisely, the duo know when to dial the energy down a notch from time to time, so that everyone involved avoids the risk of short circuiting and burning out. In this manner, even "West End Girls" feels like a bit of a comedown. Joking that they were never asked to appear on MTV Unplugged, they offer largely acoustic versions of "Rent" and "Suburbia," which only leave more room for the crowd to shout along. Of course, there's no way they couldn't do this show without ending it with a bang, and the final sequence includes "I Will Survive" into "It's a Sin," an Olympic-sized "Go West," and of course the poignant fan favorite "Being Boring." Long confined to obsolete formats, Discovery was given a long-overdue CD/DVD reissue in 2021. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Children - Released April 30, 2021 | Rhino

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Rock - Released March 26, 2021 | Rhino

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Pop - Released March 12, 2021 | Rhino

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Interlocking the cold with the heat (or maybe it’s the opposite) is Gang of Four’s specialty. In Leeds’ northern gloominess, singer Jon King, guitarist Andy Gill, bassist Dave Allen and drummer Hugo Bumham launch their post-punk revolution by means of disjointed guitars and sharp grooves. Entertainment !, their first album released in September 1979, imposes the singularity of this climatic yin and yang. Very very cold then in the melodies that Gill’s six-string clips through stridency and whittling away. But very very hot in its elastic and funky rhythms like the Talking Heads from that era. The pile-up is all the more violent that the texts from this Entertainment! aren’t really entertainment but rather small Molotov cocktails made using situationism, feminism, alienation, North-Irish conflict, Maoist guerrilla in South America and many other festive considerations… With their colleagues from The Fall, Père Ubu, Au Pairs or PIL, Gang of Four rattles the harmonies, the choruses, the solos and the melodies like no other. Their radicalism will influence years later bands like The Rapture, Radio 4, Editors, Bloc Party and Franz Ferdinand… © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released March 12, 2021 | Rhino

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Pop - Released February 26, 2021 | Rhino

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Pop - Released February 26, 2021 | Rhino

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Soul - Released February 19, 2021 | Rhino

Like the 1963 LP Nina Simone at Carnegie Hall, Folksy Nina was also recorded there on May 12, 1963, but duplicates little of the material found on that prior album. It isn't just unworthy leftovers, but a strong set in its own right, concentrating on material that could be seen as traditional or folk in orientation. It's not exactly strictly folk music, in repertoire or arrangement (which includes piano, guitar, bass, and drums, though not every tune has all of the instruments); "Twelfth of Never" (which had also appeared on the Carnegie Hall LP) certainly isn't folk music. However, there was also an uptempo piano blues, Lead Belly's "Silver City Bound," covers of the Israeli "Erets Zavat Chalav" and "Vanetihu" (which served as further proof that Simone's eclecticism knew no bounds), and the stark, moody, spiritually shaded ballads at which she excelled ("When I Was a Young Girl," "Hush Little Baby"). "Lass of the Low Country" is as exquisitely sad and beautiful as it gets. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 19, 2021 | Rhino

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The final installment of Whitesnake's Red, White, and Blues Trilogy collects some of the band's more blues-oriented work from across six studio albums. Included is the U.K. Top 20 single "Give Me All Your Love" alongside a studio version of "If You Want Me" and "River Song," taken from leader David Coverdale's 2000 solo album Into the Light. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released February 19, 2021 | Rhino

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Pop - Released February 19, 2021 | Rhino

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Pop - Released February 19, 2021 | Rhino

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R&B - Released February 12, 2021 | Rhino

Baby Huey's only album, released after his untimely death, is titled The Living Legend with good reason. He was legendary in his appearance, a 400-pound man with a penchant for flamboyant clothing and crowned by a woolly Afro, a look that is best illustrated by one of several rare photos included in the Water Records edition that shows our man in a wide-lapeled polka-dot shirt with a lime-green jacket. Beyond his unusual appearance, though, he was graced with a stunning, fierce voice on par with Otis Redding and Howard Tate, wailing and howling one moment and oddly tender and sentimental the next. Nowhere on Living Legend is his range more apparent than the opening track, "Listen to Me," where listeners are introduced to both the enigma of Baby Huey and his diamond-tough psychedelic funk backing band, the Baby Sitters. The high-energy instrumental workout "Mama Get Yourself Together" is worthy of the J.B.'s and a hazy, spiraling ten-minute rendition of Sam Cooke's chestnut "A Change Is Going to Come" confirms that the Baby Sitters could hold their own with Blood, Sweat & Tears. Further lore that catapults The Living Legend from good to great: the production was helmed by Curtis Mayfield, reason enough to make it near essential, and is highlighted by three of his compositions, "Mighty Mighty," which Mayfield and the Impressions recorded a few years earlier; "Running," a classic Mayfield cut that can only be heard here ripped to glorious bits by a band that is trying to let every member solo; and "Hard Times," which Mayfield himself would revisit on his 1975 album There's No Place Like America Today, although Baby Huey's razor-edged reading remains the definitive version -- no small caveat considering Mayfield not only wrote the tune, but could rightfully be considered one of the architects of soul to boot. © Wade Kergan /TiVo
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Pop - Released February 12, 2021 | Rhino

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Pop - Released February 12, 2021 | Rhino

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Pop - Released February 5, 2021 | Rhino

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Pop - Released February 5, 2021 | Rhino